how to hook up HD tv and receiver to the internet?

ackbar

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We just got a new HD tv with internet apps on it, so my question is,

what is the best way to hook up this and the 722 receiver to the internet so I can use both the Blockbuster@home app and the internet apps on the tv?

(I'm thinking two short lengths of ethernet cable to an ethernet splitter then a long length to the router, will that work or is my lack of technical prowess showing?)

(Also I'd like to get TV2 working on the computer in the same room the router will reside in.)
 

JM42

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If you use a spliiter, it has to be one that re-routes the pairs in the cable to the proper pins like this:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000Q5UMEI/ref=oh_o00_s00_i00_details
or this:
For only $2.02 each when QTY 50+ purchased - T Adapter Cat5e 1M/2F - 6 inch | T Adapters
It will require one "splitter" at each end.

Otherwise use an inexpensive switch (just at the TV end) like:
Amazon.com: TRENDnet TE100-S5 5-Port Ethernet Switch (5 x 10/100Mbps Auto-MDIX RJ-45 Ports): Electronics
or:
For only $7.91 each when QTY 50+ purchased - 8 Port 10/100 Mbps Fast Ethernet Switch | Network Switches


No real reccomendations for these particular units, just the first links I found.

Advantage of the switch is you get more remote ports.

Advantage of the splitter is no power supply needed and no hardware to fail.
 

jimdandyvi

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Jun 19, 2010
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If you are going to run one Ethernet cable you might as well run two. It will be the simplest, cheapest and most reliable.

I'm not sure an Ethernet splitter would work. At minimum I think you would need a switch where you were planning to put the splitter. A switch can be picked up for around $20.

The easiest option would be to buy a Ethernet over power line kit. They make them for media centers so one unit would plug into your router and the unit with four Ethernet ports would be located in your media center.

For reliability and ease of set up avoid using WiFi.
 

JM42

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If you are going to run one Ethernet cable you might as well run two. It will be the simplest, cheapest and most reliable.

I'm not sure an Ethernet splitter would work. At minimum I think you would need a switch where you were planning to put the splitter. A switch can be picked up for around $20.

The easiest option would be to buy a Ethernet over power line kit. They make them for media centers so one unit would plug into your router and the unit with four Ethernet ports would be located in your media center.

For reliability and ease of set up avoid using WiFi.

If he's got to pull the cable, then yeah, go ahead and pull two (or four).

Pair splitters work fine. Have used a lot of them over the years. Prefer them over a switch when it really is just one more port needed.

PoE is probably overkill. It's just moving the clutter of an extra power supply from the TV side to the router side, adds another piece of hardware to fail, and greaty increases expense.
 

ackbar

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SatelliteGuys Family
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Two cables is such an obvious and practical solution my brain leaped straight forward to something I might have difficulty with!

Thanks!:)
 

JM42

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There is no such thing as an Ethernet splitter. Easiest solution is two cables. Or connected up as you stated above with a switch and not a (phone line) splitter. I've bought a few fast-Ethernet 5-port switches for under $10. A couple were under $5!

YES THERE ARE. I have used them easily over 50 times. They are an excellent solution when you need an extra drop and don't want to call out your cable guy, or only have one drop an need to connect to two separate nets.

10/100mb ethernet uses two pairs. There are four pairs in the cable, the splitters take the extra two pairs and route them to appropriate pinouts. You have to use the splitter at both ends of the connection. You have two devices at the far end and need two switch ports at the wiring closet.
 

TheKrell

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I stand corrected. (You sure those aren't just phone splitters?) Edited to add, JM42 is right. There is indeed such a thing!

Don't try this with Gigabit Ethernet, since it uses all 4 pairs.
 

JM42

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I stand corrected. (You sure those aren't just phone splitters?)

By the way, don't try this with Gigabit Ethernet, since it uses all 4 pairs.

Correct, they won't pass GigE. Most switches are 100m/1G and will just see the connection as a 100mb drop. You don't hurt anything, just get 100mb link on both devices(which is fine in 95%+ of situations).
 

Cold Irons

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If you are only going to do one or 2 networked items, just run the cables. But keep in mind that the networking needs for your entertainment area will probably grow. I ended up with enough networked stuff that I use a small 4-port ethernet switch at the TV location; long ethernet run from the main router/WAP to the TV location's switch. Then the switch can connect multiple things as your systems grow; in my case a networked HDTV, Dish 722, networked HTS, and my Apple TV2.
 

dwarren2

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If your router is a wifi, you can get a wifi adapter for the dvr from Dish for $25. Is your new tv wifi enabled? If so, you may not need to run ethernet. With a usb hub, you can connect both and ehd, the wifi adapter and a sling adapter to the dvr.
 

ackbar

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SatelliteGuys Family
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Yes the tv is wifi enabled, but my understanding is the cables will be a better connection.

Two cables will be cheaper than one cable and two splitters, but I think the prices on ethernet cable at Amazon are about a third of where they were last time I looked.

Is there some trick I'm missing here?
 
Last edited:

TheKrell

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No, I think you've got it. Cables are dirt-cheap and also the best solution if you can pull them to where they're needed without making an ugly mess.
 

JayStil

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Feb 1, 2007
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Why not just run the single cable from wherever the receiver is to the router. Then put a 5 port switch (available for under $20) there and run the other cables from the switch to the components. Depending on the length of your run the switch will likely be cheaper than the extra cable, and you'll have extra ports available for other network ready devices (BluRay, game console, etc?).

I have my 722 hooked into an old Linksys router running DD-WRT in wireless bridge mode. No cable run to my main router. Works fine for Netflix & BB@home streaming.
 

Lord_Vader

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Why not just run the single cable from wherever the receiver is to the router. Then put a 5 port switch (available for under $20) there and run the other cables from the switch to the components. Depending on the length of your run the switch will likely be cheaper than the extra cable, and you'll have extra ports available for other network ready devices (BluRay, game console, etc?).

I have my 722 hooked into an old Linksys router running DD-WRT in wireless bridge mode. No cable run to my main router. Works fine for Netflix & BB@home streaming.

I agree.

If it is fairly easy, I would do like Jay is saying... Run one Ethernet and hook up a 5 port hub at the TV. A fairly cheap 10/100 Mbps would work just fine.

If running a wire is an issue, then use something like an old linksys router as a client bridge to your wireless.

You really don't need very much bandwidth. Even the wireless client bridge will get you something around 50 Mbps, which is enough to stream Netflix, and play Games on line with gobs to spare. :)
 

ackbar

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Interesting, and practical if we think of potential future expansions, but 100ft of ethernet cable is $7.58 on Amazon.

I'd like to ask, at such a low price would I have to think about quality control issues in the cable?
 

Lord_Vader

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Aug 17, 2007
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Interesting, and practical if we think of potential future expansions, but 100ft of ethernet cable is $7.58 on Amazon.

I'd like to ask, at such a low price would I have to think about quality control issues in the cable?

I would buy from monoprice. The amazon cable may be fine, but I would feel very comfortable with monoprice.com.
 

JM42

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Interesting, and practical if we think of potential future expansions, but 100ft of ethernet cable is $7.58 on Amazon.

I'd like to ask, at such a low price would I have to think about quality control issues in the cable?
I've gotten a lot from Monoprice, but if qualifying for free shipping, the Amazon cable should be fine. It's less than half the price of Monoprice+shipping.

Test it before pulling, return if you have any issues. Should be $0 out of pocket of you have to return.

With anything from Amazon, I always make sure it is a "Fulfilled By Amazon" item so I am dealing with Amazon return procedures.
 

dare2be

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I base my Amazon purchases not only on price, but on the reviews. First I look at the overall rating and distribution of the 1-5 star reviews. If there are too many low reviews, I skip it. If it is mixed, I then open the list of reviews and sort by most recent. That'll give you a sense of whether the product is trending up or down.

The $7.58 100ft ethernet is trending down...I'd avoid it.
 
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