Is AT&T gutting DIRECTV?

ncted

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This is my actual point...when you convert analog to digital...first step is to pass the analog signal through a high pass and low pass filter...this removes the frequencies that the human ear can not hear and its supposidly a waste to convert them to digital....on an old fashioned analog record from the 70s and early 80s..these signals were retransmitted...to an audio file with a high end stereo in the 70s they can feel these frequencies in the form of heat...to anyone raised on digital recordings..cds seem much clearer...and they are..but to someone used to records ..something is missing....thats the only point I wanted to make... but for people who think music isn't compressed on a CD..i just give my sympathies to

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audiophile

Filtering out inaudible frequencies is not compression in the same way as MP3. It is also not the same as dynamic range compression which is yet another thing.

I will agree that a given recording from a vinyl record can sound much warmer and natural than a CD, but almost no one records music primarily for vinyl any more, so any music recorded after the mid to late 90s is likely to have been recorded digitally from the beginning, overproduced, and quantized to within a nanometer of its life anyway and therefore be something sterile and "perfect," unlike an actual musical performance. Putting anything that falls into that category onto vinyl seems pretty pointless. Even some of the re-released older albums on vinyl you can buy today are not from the original masters, but the digital versions they used to create the CDs, etc.
 

Juan

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I know...compression happens after the analog to digital conversion...you can't compress a analog signal..i was remembering the old pre digital days
audiophile

Filtering out inaudible frequencies is not compression in the same way as MP3. It is also not the same as dynamic range compression which is yet another thing.

I will agree that a given recording from a vinyl record can sound much warmer and natural than a CD, but almost no one records music primarily for vinyl any more, so any music recorded after the mid to late 90s is likely to have been recorded digitally from the beginning, overproduced, and quantized to within a nanometer of its life anyway and therefore be something sterile and "perfect," unlike an actual musical performance. Putting anything that falls into that category onto vinyl seems pretty pointless. Even some of the re-released older albums on vinyl you can buy today are not from the original masters, but the digital versions they used to create the CDs, etc.
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TheTechGuru

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Oct 30, 2010
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Currently satellite DirecTV uses 384kbps 48kHz Dolby Digital 5.1 or 448kbps 48kHz Dolby Digital 5.1 EX or 384kbps 48kHz Dolby Digital 2.0 depending on the channel.
 

CycloneSat

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So why did comcast develop an ap for roku and firetv that allows you to watch cable tv with an interactive guide on a secondary tv?..only available on wifi

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Because they’re Comcast. It’s dumb for a company to add apps that will convince a customer to leave the platform, there’s no defending that.
 

NashGuy

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So why did comcast develop an ap for roku and firetv that allows you to watch cable tv with an interactive guide on a secondary tv?..only available on wifi
Their Xfinity Stream app is available for Roku and a few smart TVs (but not Fire TV or Apple TV, yet anyway). I think there are two reasons they did that.

The first reason is political. There was pressure building at the FCC a few years back for cable TV providers to come up with a software-based successor to CableCARD (the thing that lets TiVos work with cable TV, but which has never been widely adopted by consumers). The idea is that this new standard would work with IPTV services (not just traditional QAM cable TV, lke CableCARD) and allow TiVo and other hardware providers to offer retail devices that consumers could buy and own, rather than being forced to rent the operator's set-top box. Comcast, AT&T, Charter and other major operators were opposed to such a move and succeeded in swaying regulators by saying that they would simply create apps for their cable TV services that could work on various streaming devices, like Roku, that were already far more popular than TiVo/CableCARD ever was.

The second reason you see Comcast making their cable TV service available via an app is due to competitive business pressures. In the age of Netflix and Prime Video, not to mention streaming cable TV competitors like YouTube TV and Hulu Live, consumers have gotten used to the freedom of using their own retail devices to access subscription video. People increasingly expect not to pay to rent boxes that are forced on them by those who offer pay TV services. So Comcast unveiled a new pricing strategy in part of their footprint this past spring and is slowly rolling it out elsewhere. The cable TV package no longer includes the cost of the first set-top box. When you sign up online, Comcast's site specifically informs you that you can use their Xfinity Stream app on your own devices at no additional charge OR you can choose to rent their X1 boxes at $5/mo each. Your choice.

Of course, Comcast prefers that their customers use their own X1 boxes, and they continually improve them to make them more attractive by adding more and more streaming apps so that consumers don't feel the need to choose or switch to a Roku or Apple TV over their own X1. But they realize that they need to offer the *option* to use other devices too, both for political and competitive reasons.
 

theBruce

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So why did comcast develop an ap for roku and firetv that allows you to watch cable tv with an interactive guide on a secondary tv?..only available on wifi

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Does not have to be a secondary TV, it can be for your first or all TVs, they do not require you to have to rent a box.

I still do not want their live TV service or anyone else's.

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lparsons21

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Yep, as people cut the cord and find there are other ways to watch shows instead of the linear way we do now, we might very well see that the cable/sat replacement streamers have a tough road ahead.

Currently some of the ad-supported free streamers are gaining subscriptions and being more profitable than the pay versions.


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CSM

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Aug 28, 2015
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Yep, as people cut the cord and find there are other ways to watch shows instead of the linear way we do now, we might very well see that the cable/sat replacement streamers have a tough road ahead.

Currently some of the ad-supported free streamers are gaining subscriptions and being more profitable than the pay versions.


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Will their always be OTA or will the studios who produce the programs for that move those to SVOD and AVOD?
 
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lparsons21

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Will their always be OTA or will the studios who produce the programs for that move those to SVOD andvAVOD?
Darned good question! If streaming becomes the norm then the future for local stations looks fairly bleak. Consider that they started as ad-supported only and are now making more money with carriage fees, and if streamers don’t carry them and cable/sat dies down, how will they stay in business?


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theBruce

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What if News and Sports SVOD and AVOD had live news and sports feeds? I am surprised Fox Nation doesn’t have a live feed of FOX News.
For News they do for free, CBS News is 24 hours and ABC and NBC News are both going 24 hours.


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NashGuy

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Yep, as people cut the cord and find there are other ways to watch shows instead of the linear way we do now, we might very well see that the cable/sat replacement streamers have a tough road ahead.

Currently some of the ad-supported free streamers are gaining subscriptions and being more profitable than the pay versions.
I've always found it a little odd the amount of attention that these live streaming cable TV services like YouTube TV, PS Vue, etc. receive over at Cord Cutters News and on other cord-cutter-centric sites and forums. Pretty sure over the past few years that the majority of those cutting the cord on traditional cable/satellite services have NOT been turning to a streaming replacement service but rather simply to on-demand streaming services like Netflix and HBO Now (sometimes in combination with free OTA TV). And then there's a growing number of "cord-nevers," young adults forming households (e.g. post-college) who never sign up for any kind of live cable TV service in the first place.

As long as live cable TV service remains a thing, I expect that the great majority of those who subscribe to it will get it from the same company that sells them internet service. Although, as two of the nation's biggest internet providers, AT&T and Comcast, get into the OTT streaming video business, I think the line will blur somewhat in terms of whether the live cable TV services they offer are "traditional cable TV" or "streaming cable TV". I do think it's likely that many smaller broadband providers, and possibly even larger ones like Charter and Verizon, ultimately shut down their own first-party cable TV services and instead strike deals to sell the streaming cable TV and on-demand services run by other companies to their broadband customers.
 

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