Please Add A Bypass For 3D Compatibility (1 Viewer)

TheTechGuru

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Many would greatly appreciate it if a bypass for 3D compatibility could be added to future firmware so that the receiver can be forced to just send out the 3D (I assume it's side-by-side format) anyway even if it does not detect that the TV is a compatible model.

Thank you.
 

Jimbo

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Many would greatly appreciate it if a bypass for 3D compatibility could be added to future firmware so that the receiver can be forced to just send out the 3D (I assume it's side-by-side format) anyway even if it does not detect that the TV is a compatible model.

Thank you.

Your saying you want the 3D signal sent regardless of weather or not your TV can encode it ?
 

TheTechGuru

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Your saying you want the 3D signal sent regardless of weather or not your TV can encode it ?

Yes, the option to, not automatically. Automatically would confuse people that don't know how to do something with it.


I currently watch 3D BluRay's on my non-3D HDTV in red/cyan format *hint* *hint*.

This would also help people that have 3DTV's that are just not on the compatible list attempt to get it to work.
 

JerseyMatt

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Sep 17, 2010
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Other than the color loss, it works.

and the glasses are dirt cheap Red Blue Cyan NVIDIA 3D VISION Myopia General Glasses | eBay

Blech. The color loss is a bit more than the trivial nuisance you're painting it as. Anaglyph is what caused 3D to die as a technology every time it was brought back because every generation went in with great expectations and then realized how badly it sucked. It also causes headaches and nausea in a large percentage of users.

The new 3DTVs are compatible with the current RealD glasses you get for a buck or two at the movies. The first generation $100-a-pair electronic shutter glasses are history.
 

cypherstream

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JerseyMatt said:
The new 3DTVs are compatible with the current RealD glasses you get for a buck or two at the movies. The first generation $100-a-pair electronic shutter glasses are history.

Really? How does that work? I'm interested in the cost and models of these TV's and if they are available to purchase.
 

cypherstream

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TheTechGuru said:
I'd imagine it uses a polarized screen.

That's my thought too, but if it's that easy it makes me wonder why they didn't do it that way the first time around.

Sent from my iPhone using SatelliteGuys
 

JerseyMatt

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I believe it's cheaper to make the TVs that use the shutter glasses, because it's a single polarization (but double the frames) with the glasses doing the bulk of the work. The dual polarized screen is the far superior technology but costs more to make.

From what I hear, Samsung and LG have partnered with RealD, but others are using the same technology.
 

JerseyMatt

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Sep 17, 2010
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Really? How does that work? I'm interested in the cost and models of these TV's and if they are available to purchase.

Q: What's the difference between "active" and "passive" 3D TVs?
A: The first wave of 3D TVs released in 2010 were all active 3D TVs that used shutter-type active 3D glasses. In 2011, most 3D TVs are still active, but some TV makers have also introduced passive 3D models.

Active 3D
— Active 3D TVs require viewers to wear battery-powered active shutter glasses to see the 3D effects. These shutter glasses feature LCD lenses that alternately block the view of the right eye and left eye in response to sync signals beamed wirelessly from the TV. Active 3D TVs provide full 1080p picture resolution for each eye. However, the glasses are expensive and usually bulkier than passive glasses, and some viewers are bothered by their high-speed flickering.

Passive 3D — Passive 3D TVs provide a 3D experience that's very similar to watching a 3D movie in a theater. For passive 3D TVs, the screen is doing almost all of the work. Not only are two video images being displayed, but there's also a special screen coating that works with the polarizing passive glasses to create the 3D effect. Passive 3D glasses are lightweight and inexpensive and require no batteries — they're virtually identical to the 3D glasses handed out in movie theaters. Passive 3D provides a picture that's crisp and bright and free of any traces of flicker. Passive 3D technology is less sensitive to a viewer's viewing angle or head movement, which makes it easier for several people to enjoy convincing 3D effects.

Here's an article about a head to head study of active vs passive 3D. It has a few models listed in it.

http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-20102018-1/study-finds-passive-3d-tvs-superior-to-active/

And here's the actual study: http://www.displaymate.com/3D_TV_ShootOut_1.htm
 
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