Question on proper cable to use

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USAF-RET

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Feb 20, 2008
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Rio Rancho, NM
I had DirecTV installed a couple of hours ago. 2 HD-DVRs. Both are located in the living room, but I want to also connect one to the TV in the bedroom. To that end, I've cut a couple of holes in the wall and installed J-boxes to facilitate passing a cable from one room to the other. I'll be using 5 wire component cable to connect. The run is about 35 feet or so, by the time I run the cable around the walls instead of straight across the floor.

I'm sitting here with credit card in hand and one browser tab already on the proper page of monoprice.com. I see RG-6 and RG-59 both listed at a considerable difference in price. I know that RG-6 is the preferred size of coax running from the dish to the receiver.

My question is: is there that much difference in quality between RG-6 and RG-59 when used as component cables? If it helps, the TV in the bedroom is only a 27" set and usually viewed through half closed eyes.
 
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JustinF

Active SatelliteGuys Member
Oct 3, 2007
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Always use RG-6 cable. RG-59 isn't able to handle the many channels of DTV. RG-6 is the norm now.
 
iwc5893

iwc5893

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Feb 1, 2007
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The desert of WA, zip code EIEIO
I had DirecTV installed a couple of hours ago. 2 HD-DVRs. Both are located in the living room, but I want to also connect one to the TV in the bedroom. To that end, I've cut a couple of holes in the wall and installed J-boxes to facilitate passing a cable from one room to the other. I'll be using 5 wire component cable to connect. The run is about 35 feet or so, by the time I run the cable around the walls instead of straight across the floor.

I'm sitting here with credit card in hand and one browser tab already on the proper page of monoprice.com. I see RG-6 and RG-59 both listed at a considerable difference in price. I know that RG-6 is the preferred size of coax running from the dish to the receiver.

My question is: is there that much difference in quality between RG-6 and RG-59 when used as component cables? If it helps, the TV in the bedroom is only a 27" set and usually viewed through half closed eyes.

I'm confused...what are you trying to do?
1) Add a 3rd HD-DVR - will require a WB multiswitch
2) Have one of your current DVR's run two TV's - coax cable will not work since the HD-DVR's don't have a coax output
3) Relocate a DVR - RG-6 tri-shield or better is what you would need

It makes a difference in what you will need to purchase and run.
 
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USAF-RET

Thread Starter
Member
Feb 20, 2008
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Rio Rancho, NM
Sorry for the confusion. Concerning the DVR in question, I've connected to the TV in the living room via HDMI cable. Now want to run a component line to the bedroom from the same DVR. I see on monoprice.com that component cable comes in two flavors, RG-59 and RG-6, similar to coax cable rating. I was asking opinions as to which of the two would be best for the component cable that I am going to run.

Based on the post from JustinF, I've ordered the RG-6.

My reference to coax in the original msg was merely to state that I'm aware that there is a definite gauge preference when running coax from the dish to the receiver, but I was wondering if the same reasoning applied in running component cable from the receiver to the TV.

Cheers
 
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bubbers44

SatelliteGuys Family
Apr 6, 2006
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I bought a component and audio cable to run from my receiver in the living room about 20 ft to the downstairs game room TV. It seems to be what you would want only a little longer. It gives you all five hook ups without having to solder connectors on RG6. I am not sure if the impedence of RG6 matches component cables. RG6 I think is 50 ohms. It will probably work either way though.
 
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Andrewwski

SatelliteGuys Pro
Aug 24, 2007
1,205
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For component video RG59 is the standard. There's certainly no disadvantage to using RG6, but it's not necessary.

RG59 and RG6 are both 75 ohms.

If you've got a decent compression tool, you can get RCA compression fittings for both sizes, RG59 are much easier to come by. If not, you'll need to solder, so make sure you use RG59 with copper shielding (RG6 isn't made with copper shield anymore, and you can't solder to aluminum).
 
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nibyak

Member
Dec 7, 2004
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I do not believe that the OP is going to be fabricating Component cables from scratch. Monoprice sells Component cables made from RG-59 and also from RG-6. He stated that he has ordered the RG-6 cable. I’m sure that this cable will work just fine. I pretty sure that the RG-59 would have worked just as good but we don’t need to worry about that anymore.
 
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Andrewwski

SatelliteGuys Pro
Aug 24, 2007
1,205
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Yes, he is. Read the first post.

And JustinF was assuming that he was using it to pass satellite signal, which is not what he said he's doing.

Either way, RG6 will work fine, but RG59 would have worked fine too (and been easier to pull/terminate).
 
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