Usb broadband adapter for 722 needed. (1 Viewer)

nodsirrah

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Family
Jul 2, 2006
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I am too old to understand all the new wireless stuff!
Dish Online suggests using a "WIFI Broadband connector" to connect my 722 wirelessly to my in-house wireless network in order to use my computer in conjunction with the 722.
Specifically, what USB adapter works? I would prefer the short style so I can plug it in the front of the 722 so I can close the door. I tested my bluetooth usb adapter in the slot and it fits.
Manufacturers part numbers will be greatly appreciated as I would be lost otherwise :(.
Thanks
 

Jim S.

When someone asks you if you're a god, you say yes
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Jan 2, 2006
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The only officially sanctioned adapter is the Netgear WNDA3100, version 2. (Make sure it's a version 2, the original is known to not work.) I haven't heard of anyone having any luck with other models. Unfortunately, it's not going to fit behind the door. Does the 722 have a rear USB port, or are you using that for a hard drive?

Another possibility is using an ethernet-to-wifi bridge. But if you really know nothing about wifi, you may need to get someone to help you set it up. Also I've heard reports of some people having trouble with bridges, even though there's no obvious reason why -- a proper bridge should be transparent.

A third possibility, maybe, is using the powerline network capability built into the receiver. You'd need a powerline network module to plug into your router, and the receiver wouldn't be able to be plugged into a surge protector unless it was one specifically designed for powerline networking. And the receiver and adapter might need to be on the same phase of the power supply. The other reason that I said "maybe" is because I don't really know if the receivers are set up to use the powerline connection for the new features that just came out, or if it was just there to keep from having to plug multiple receivers into a phone line to verify that you're using them all in the same residence. Hopefully someone can jump in with the answer to that.
 

Neutron

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Nov 7, 2003
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PM one of the DIRT members here (their names are in red) and ask about getting the sling link power line adapter.
 

KAB

SatelliteGuys Master
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Sep 20, 2005
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PM one of the DIRT members here (their names are in red) and ask about getting the sling link power line adapter.

A Dish Tech told me he recommends that over the wireless adapter.
 

MattG@DISH

SatelliteGuys Pro
Dec 30, 2010
3,871
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Denver, Colorado
I am too old to understand all the new wireless stuff!
Dish Online suggests using a "WIFI Broadband connector" to connect my 722 wirelessly to my in-house wireless network in order to use my computer in conjunction with the 722.
Specifically, what USB adapter works? I would prefer the short style so I can plug it in the front of the 722 so I can close the door. I tested my bluetooth usb adapter in the slot and it fits.
Manufacturers part numbers will be greatly appreciated as I would be lost otherwise :(.
Thanks

As mentioned, the Netgear (Model WNDA3100v2) Wifi broadband connector is the one that we officially support. You can order it from dish.com, or through an agent (like myself) for $25. There is also the Powerline Broadband Connector (aka SlingLink), which connects your receiver to your internet using your home's electrical wiring (this would be $30)

Wi-Fi BB Connector
Powerline BB Connector
 

nodsirrah

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Family
Jul 2, 2006
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Sorry to take so long to respond, I thought I would get an email about replies to my thread, I guess I did not set up my Post correctly.
When the Technician replaced my defective 722 he plugged the Powerline Broadband Adapter into the same receptacle as the router which is across the room from the receiver. He tried to set up the PBA and it would not work and since he spoke limited english I had no idea what he was saying. He could not even describe what the Broadband would do. After reading posts like this I believe I have 2 problems, the receiver is plugged into a surge protector and the router is on the same phase as the receiver, anothe example how strongly I adhere to Murphy' Law!
My EHD is connected to the rear USB port. Can I remove the access door on the front on the receiver so I can insert the WIFI adapter without affecting the Warranty?
Lastly, is there any functionality advantage in using either the WIFI adapter or the PBA? More functionality would help me decide which method is worth the effort.
 

dishnet_tech

SatelliteGuys Pro
Feb 18, 2010
303
16
NE United States
The Netgear Wifi comes with a usb extension cable to allow the adapter to be located away from the receiver, which would let you close the cabinet door. The slinglink (pba) is the preferred broadband connectivity device, behind a hardline ethernet connection, followed by the wifi adapter. As stated by someone previously, neither the slinglink nor the receiver should be plugged into a surge protector. Also, the two electrical outlets need to be on the same electrical circuit for the connection to be made. There is a little setup required to get either of these devices to work, you don't just plug them in.
 

nodsirrah

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Family
Jul 2, 2006
46
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I believe I will go with the PBA, assuming it may have some advantage such as speed.
I have already convinced myself to connect the Dish receivers directly to a wall receptacle. Having both devices on the same "electrical circuit" confuses me, if the purpose is to eventually have all the receivers in the house wirelessly connected to the PBA through the house wiring, one would have to rewire the house. I think what you mean is to have all devices connected to the same electrical phase, assuming either the A or B phase, then it would be simple to switch circuit feeds on the circuit breaker panel so they would all be on either the A or B phase.
 

Hightech

SatelliteGuys Family
Jul 4, 2004
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Midwest
It is unlikely to have any "speed" advantage anywhere but in a manufacturer spec sheet, I have tested many different brands of these products and they get no where close in terms of speed as there spec sheets state, YMMV. I have seen WAY faster speeds out of 802.11 g and N wifi and I certainly do NOT like the idea of leaving my dish equipment unprotected from a lightning protection device.
 

thomasjk

SatelliteGuys Pro
Jan 10, 2006
2,187
488
Charlotte, NC
dishnet_tech said:
Also, the two electrical outlets need to be on the same electrical circuit for the connection to be made.

Not true. I have my receiver downstairs and the PBA upstairs next to the router. It works just fine.
 

TG2

SatelliteGuys Pro
Feb 7, 2011
1,380
7
Viginia
I'm with HighTech on the protection aspect ... one further I have my DVR's on backups (battery backed UPS's) aside from voltage issues, also means that if the power goes out I can still get a recording done for a few hours (50 or so Watts draw on a 300VA UPS ... good couple of hours..

Also agree on the speed issue. While you *could* get a decent speed out of it .. the whole reason why dish advocates the powerline adapter is that 1 30 dollar adapter could connect to all of your dish receivers (ie, 4 dish receivers that have home plug for 1 30 dollar part) rather than paying 25 a piece for wireless dongle ...

Powerline adapters can work .. but if they don't you won't really have a way to determine that the powerline network is the cause of problems without still running another method of connectivity, and if that's via ethernet cable then you'll not need the power line adapter afterwards.. :)

The altnerative option is to get a wireless ethernet bridge ... some are called Gaming Adapters, still others go after the budget minded of us and explain them as router/bridge/access point ... some with simple web gui selection to set the use type ... the benefit of such is upgrade ability .. expandability ...one router/bridge with 4 ports gives you 4 ethernet drops or even add cheap switch on top of a cheap 4 port router/bridge and get even more ports... (newegg was selling some decent cheap routers that could be reloaded with DD-WRT if the default features didn't include bridging .. 29 bucks for a router ... 30 for a powerline adapter ... the router can be reloaded and reused or given away when you upgrade again for someone else ...etc..)
 

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