What makes gives the motor power?

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Roni

Active SatelliteGuys Member
Original poster
Nov 8, 2006
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I own a small cnc machine shop and I would like to put together a motor of my own design but I need to know what powers the motor and what kind of signal that motor receives. Does anyone know if the motors that you purchase are dc or ac? Any info would be great. Thank you
 
receiver sends either 13 or 18volts DC to the motor depending if its a horizontal or vertical polarity channel
 
yes the specs on my motors say 13 (vertical) or 18 V dc (horizontal) which is slightly faster. This is supplied via receiver
it uses 50 mA (in standby mode) 200 mA (normal) 350 mA (max)

you can probably make you own but most of the newer motors are preprogramed so it can use USALS , which if you key in your long & lat it will , if you have everything set up correctly scan the arc. and stop at the next satellite.

hopefully i explained that correctly
 
yes the specs on my motors say 13 (vertical) or 18 V dc (horizontal) which is slightly faster.

correct. Since its sending more power, it runs faster. Thats why if I need to go from SBS6 to G10 I select Research or UWTV which are Horizontal. Gets there faster :)
 
Thats why if I need to go from SBS6 to G10 I select Research or UWTV which are Horizontal. Gets there faster

thats a good tip , i don't think i read it in the tip section but i have slept since i read it. use horizontal channels when moving the dish..

thanks
 
correct. Since its sending more power, it runs faster. Thats why if I need to go from SBS6 to G10 I select Research or UWTV which are Horizontal. Gets there faster :)
Kind of like how if I want to motor over to 30 west I select TV Marti because it's on a horizontal TP.

It's a heck of a trek from G10R to Hispasat! :D
 
Thanks guys

Thanks for all of the great input. This helps me out. I was wondering if the motor tilts the dish up and down or does it just swing it from side to side. Thanks again
 
The motor shaft is bent so that it tilts the dish up and down (elevation) as well as adjusts for skew as it crosses the arc. That's why when you install a motorized dish you want to leave the LNBF skew at '0' (center).
 
Yep, motors are cheaper for the most part.... although, if you could rig up some sort of a motor that would be like an sg2100 that was strong enough to work reliably for buds and/or larger sized minibuds without the weight being too much strain on the motor, and could get it to be cheaper than actuators, you may have a potential market.
 
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