Add OTA signal to the Directv coax network? (2 Viewers)

Daranch

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Could I split an input on my Directv and connect an over the air signal? The reason would be to use my jacks as either DTV or OTA. Would there be a conflict?
 

Jimbo

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Jul 14, 2005
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Another reason I refuse to upgrade.
I didn't upgrade for the longest time, then finally did years ago, as long as I could keep my HR24's working I was fine (one in RV, genie wouldn't work).
Other than the HR24's getting slow, they are still working ok.
They gave me no option as far as upgrading in this instance.
 
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Jimbo

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I didn't upgrade for the longest time, then finally did years ago, as long as I could keep my HR24's working I was fine (one in RV, genie wouldn't work).
Other than the HR24's getting slow, they are still working ok.
They gave me no option as far as upgrading in this instance.
Correction ...
Genie would work great in the RV, except they won't allow me a 2nd Genie on the same account, even if it's not on the same network.
 

Aiken

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Nov 24, 2020
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Aiken
If you are not using a MOCA/DECA network on the coax then yes. If you are then no.

You'd need to use actual diplexers, not regular splitters.

I'm using Holland's myself: Holland 2-Amp Diplexer for Dish Pro Plus 44 Switch (DPD2) from Solid Signal
The DPD2 manual says it's specifically for the Dish DP44. Will it work with Directv HR44-700? If so, I assume that I would need 1 to combine the signals into the existing Directv line before entering the house and another to split the signals inside the house. Correct?
 

slice1900

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The DPD2 manual says it's specifically for the Dish DP44. Will it work with Directv HR44-700? If so, I assume that I would need 1 to combine the signals into the existing Directv line before entering the house and another to split the signals inside the house. Correct?

That's just an ordinary diplexer, so it will work as far as separating TV and satellite - but that will block any receiver to receiver or receiver to client communication.

So there are two ways you could make it work. One, using one outside to combine your antenna/dish and then another as the FIRST THING on the coax once you get inside the house - you'd have separate coax runs for antenna and satellite to each TV (i.e. two coax if you want both at a location)

Two, if you have only the HR44 then you can separate the coax at the HR44 since it won't have any clients to talk to.
 

Aiken

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Nov 24, 2020
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Aiken
That's just an ordinary diplexer, so it will work as far as separating TV and satellite - but that will block any receiver to receiver or receiver to client communication.

So there are two ways you could make it work. One, using one outside to combine your antenna/dish and then another as the FIRST THING on the coax once you get inside the house - you'd have separate coax runs for antenna and satellite to each TV (i.e. two coax if you want both at a location)

Two, if you have only the HR44 then you can separate the coax at the HR44 since it won't have any clients to talk to.
Thanks for your fast reply. It looks like it should solve my problem. I'll give it a try.
 

HoTat2

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Jun 12, 2012
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That's just an ordinary diplexer, so it will work as far as separating TV and satellite - but that will block any receiver to receiver or receiver to client communication.

So there are two ways you could make it work. One, using one outside to combine your antenna/dish and then another as the FIRST THING on the coax once you get inside the house - you'd have separate coax runs for antenna and satellite to each TV (i.e. two coax if you want both at a location)

Two, if you have only the HR44 then you can separate the coax at the HR44 since it won't have any clients to talk to.
But one other consideration slice ...

How well if any, does the typical 950-2150 MHz "SAT" side of an ordinary satellite diplexer handle the special low frequency 2.3 MHz SWiM control signal?

I would think it's safer for the OP to use the NAS 9501 satellite diplexers.



Sent from my LM-V600 using Tapatalk
 

slice1900

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But one other consideration slice ...

How well if any, does the typical 950-2150 MHz "SAT" side of an ordinary satellite diplexer handle the special low frequency 2.3 MHz SWiM control signal?

I would think it's safer for the OP to use the NAS 9501 satellite diplexers.


That's close enough to baseband that it is essentially "DC" as far as a diplexer's circuitry goes. You'd have to go out of your way to design something that passed DC but didn't pass 2.3 MHz.

Old school pre-digital CCTV systems wouldn't have worked otherwise, they didn't use "splitters" they just used T taps to "split" signals that were only up to a few MHz. One could do the same if you wanted to pass only DC and SWM control signals, and drop everything else.
 

TheTechGuru

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Oct 30, 2010
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But one other consideration slice ...

How well if any, does the typical 950-2150 MHz "SAT" side of an ordinary satellite diplexer handle the special low frequency 2.3 MHz SWiM control signal?

I would think it's safer for the OP to use the NAS 9501 satellite diplexers.



Sent from my LM-V600 using Tapatalk

I've been using the Holland's myself for years to diplex in my OTA antenna in with my SWM dish and HR24's. Never had any problems.
 

TheTechGuru

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The DPD2 manual says it's specifically for the Dish DP44. Will it work with Directv HR44-700? If so, I assume that I would need 1 to combine the signals into the existing Directv line before entering the house and another to split the signals inside the house. Correct?
yes and a additional for each TV if you're running to multiple.

Here is my setup:

 
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HoTat2

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Jun 12, 2012
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That's close enough to baseband that it is essentially "DC" as far as a diplexer's circuitry goes. You'd have to go out of your way to design something that passed DC but didn't pass 2.3 MHz.

Old school pre-digital CCTV systems wouldn't have worked otherwise, they didn't use "splitters" they just used T taps to "split" signals that were only up to a few MHz. One could do the same if you wanted to pass only DC and SWM control signals, and drop everything else.
Oh Ok then, ...

Just that ever since I saw how Sonora Design would always specifically list the frequency response numbers for the 2.3 MHz SWiM control signal of their DIRECTV compatible di/triplexers.

I assumed that was something the ordinary ones such as used by DISH weren't designed and optimized for and thus could cause problems in a DIRECTV SWiM installation.

Sent from my LM-V600 using Tapatalk
 

slice1900

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Oh Ok then, ...

Just that ever since I saw how Sonora Design would always specifically list the frequency response numbers for the 2.3 MHz SWiM control signal of their DIRECTV compatible di/triplexers.

I assumed that was something the ordinary ones such as used by DISH weren't designed and optimized for and thus could cause problems in a DIRECTV SWiM installation.

Sonora is just being thorough, they properly document everything and stand behind it in a Directv environment. There's a market for "I want to pay more and have someone to call if things don't work" as well as a market for "I want to spend as little as possible or use what I have laying around".

I am in the latter category, but if someone was paying me to install Directv in a commercial environment I'd damn sure be the former! :)
 

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