Can I link two Silver Sensors?

jcrash

SatelliteGuys Pro
Original poster
Sep 26, 2003
221
0
Tulsa
Where I live, I need to rotate my Silver Sensor 180 degrees from the optimal placement in order to get a good signal for ABC.

Is there some way I can just have two silver sensors and link them together? If so, what would I need?
 
It can be done and I have seen it but you may wind up with multipath problems. A google search will show you several articles on stacking antenna and placing them 180 degrees apart.

Is an outdoor or attic antenna a reasonablwe option for you.
 
I have 2 link together on a UHF combiner switch. One is pointed at Boston towers, and the other at the Providence towers. I have them on opposite sides of the house and have no mutipath isses.
 
just connect them together with a splitter in reverse.

A splitter will not allow the 2 antennas from interfering with each other. In some cases this can actually make things worse than better.
To properly add a single channel to the system, that channel's frequency needs to be filtered coming from the one antenna. The other antenna needs to have that single channel frequency trapped out. This all can be done with a single passive device made by Channel Master called an Join-tenna. Check out this site.
John
 
Lots of people will say you can't join them, but I have no problems. I have an antenna pointed at 90 degrees, and one at 220. They are joined with a splitter, and on the same pole.

On the analog, there is definately some multipath.

On digital, everything is fine. Sometimes it takes a few seconds to start showing the channel, I figure it is just sorting the signals out.

The few seconds is worth having 52 channels, instead of 30. At least to me.
 
I thought they did not sell the JOIN-TENNA mentioned in the lnk above many more.

Anyone know of an other source for something similar?
 
I learned a long time ago when making custom antennas and speaker setups never ever use ceramic or metal film resistors in place of a transformer like that hdtvprimer page did. keep it simple combine the antennas with 300 ohm ultra low loss wire similar to how the multi-bay antennas are made!
 
Forgot the zenith silver sensor is not a traditional 300 ohm uhf yagi antenna it has a 75 ohm tap between the top and bottom element. the proper way to connect (2) zenith silver sensors would be to use a 75 ohm antenna combiner (not the same as a "splitter").
 
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Forgot the zenith silver sensor is not a traditional 300 ohm uhf yagi antenna it has a 75 ohm tap between the top and bottom element. the proper way to connect (2) zenith silver sensors would be to use a 75 ohm antenna combiner (not the same as a "splitter").

Where does one buy that?

FYI - I have googled antenna combiner and the results are something to combine UHV with VHF (not what I need) and a bunch of really expensive stuff.

I think you made it up!
 
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Try the splitter. It's not expensive. It may work or it may work sometimes. If it doesn't work at all go to an A/B switch will prevent the multipath issues and it won't cost you 3dB of signal like the splitter does. The only drawback is you need to flip the switch each time and the obvious issues with DVR/TIVO recording.
 
To reduce multipath when using coaxial cable splitters to combine multiple antennas start with the same coaxial cable length connected to each antenna. the longer the cables are the more this helps what you want is each channel signal from the antennas to hit the splitter at about the same time.
 
To reduce multipath when using coaxial cable splitters to combine multiple antennas start with the same coaxial cable length connected to each antenna. the longer the cables are the more this helps what you want is each channel signal from the antennas to hit the splitter at about the same time.

Using the same line length between the splitter and antennas will accomplish nothing when the two antennas are pointed in different directions. The interfering signal from antenna 2 can be reflected from any random external surface resulting significant phase differences in just inches of difference in propagation distance.
 
nighthawk, a zenith silver sensor has no reflector and not very directional if the antennas had a very good reflector or were parabolic dishes i would agree.
 
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nighthawk, a zenith silver sensor has no reflector and not very directional if the antennas had a very good reflector or were parabolic dishes i would agree.

I believe you miss the point. The two antennas are pointed in different directions. Both antennas can receive the same signal. One directly and the other being reflected from an unpredictable distance and/or multiple reflective surfaces. This makes the combined phases at the splitter unpredictible and therefore attempting to equalize the phase with equal length cables a futile task. It doesn't matter if the antenna has a reflector or not.
 

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