Dish Size (1 Viewer)

Register Today to see less ads! It's Free!
Status
Please reply by conversation.

litroc

New Member
Jun 4, 2008
2
0
Hi everyone , I am litroc. I am new to this fta but I want to take it on as a hobby.
I was doing some research and the sats I want are galaxy 10 (123) and anik f1 0r f2. I read that I need a minimum of a 30 inch dish. Does this have to be a round dish or can it be an oval shaped dish with it's length being 30 inches?
And also , how do I know what kind of lnb to use? linear or circular?
And what is a horizontal and/or vertical lnb mean?

Thank you in advance to anyone that can help me with these questions, it is greatly appreciated.:wave

I am located near Toronto in Southern ,Ontario, Canada
 
Register Today to see less ads! It's Free!

Lak7

SatelliteGuys Master
Pub Member / Supporter
Feb 28, 2008
5,451
7
Near Chicago, Illinois
For Linear FTA, a 30" Round dish is required for decent reception, bigger is better.

" And also , how do I know what kind of lnb to use? linear or circular?
And what is a horizontal and/or vertical lnb mean?"


To keep it simple....
Circular = DishNet/DirecTV/BellExpressVu
Linear = FTA

Horizontal and Vertical are "wave patterns", it requires Skew Control

Circular uses Clockwise & Counterclockwise "wave patterns" referred to as Left Hand and Right Hand, no Skew Control required
 

Mr Tony

SatelliteGuys Pro
Supporting Founder
Nov 17, 2003
294
42
Mankato, MN
AnikF1 & F2 are for Starchoice subscription service and has very little (if any) free to air programing
 

Fizbi

SatelliteGuys Pro
May 16, 2008
539
77
Wild and Windy Casper, WY
Bigger dishes are better

I've been scratching my head on this one for a long time.

I've also been collecting data sheets on LNBs -which include block diagrams and schematics, in an effort to find real data to match a dish size to an LNB. What I'm finding is that there is no AGC involved when amplifying the signal from the dish antenna. There may be two to four (or more) stages of amplification to get the final signal sent to the receiver (amplification based on frequency to counter coax loss at the output stage).

It is possible to get a dish that is too big and one that is too small.
Too big and you overdrive the LNB. However, too big will most likely destroy your wallet. The current affordable selection of FTA dishes will not harm your LNB.

After reading many websites and PDF files (I have a big list now), I have come to the conclusion that:

"A bigger dish is a better solution for most people who have reception
difficulties."

Meaning, if you can afford the bigger dish and you want to beat the weather, reduce signal loss, improve poor reception due to tree branches, telephone poles, wires, or other obstacles, then get the bigger dish.

Currently, I only have a few weak channels that cause fits to receprion when the wind picks up, or it gets pounded with rain or snow. So, if I want to fix my weak signals, my best bet is to go to a larger dish. My current FTA wet dream is to get a 120cm dish and mount it on my motor.

Further reading shows that you will get a better system with a larger dish. Like with any receiving system, half your system is based on the quality of your antenna. The cheaper receiver with a better antenna, beats the more expensive receiver with a cheaper antenna.

I'm going to start looking for a used 120cm dish in my neighborhood.

:hungry:
 
Register Today to see less ads! It's Free!
Register Today to see less ads! It's Free!
Status
Please reply by conversation.

Users who are viewing this thread

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 0, Members: 0, Guests: 0)

Latest posts

Top