DISH wants Starlink to Cease Operations (1 Viewer)

arlo

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Dec 4, 2016
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North Eastern
The latency of Starlink depends on many factors, mostly how close your terrestrial Starlink terminal is in relationship to the Starlink ground station. Where I am, the Starlink Ground Station would either be located in Broadville, IL, or Hillman, MI. So, the trip up to the Starlink satellite at 550 km altitude, back down to the Earth station, and from there it's just like any other Internet provider concerning latency.
So, assume 550 km up and 550 km away, that's roughly 778 km, or 777,817 meters. Light travels 300,000,000 m/s in a vacuum, so the travel time up and assuming a similar situation for the trip down, yields a little over 5 ms for the outbound leg, maybe adding 1 ms for internal processing time in the satellite. So, Starlink could add just under 15 ms to the "normal" terrestrial Internet travel time. My attached example doesn't attempt to figure out the actual distances involved at this moment in time where I had three possible paths to the Internet backbone. If I were attempting to connect to my work system, the additional travel would pretty much be the distance up (550 km), the distance down (550 km), and the backbone time from Broadville, IL to our Corporate datacenter near Chicago. But, that would be the best case, and it would probably jump up another 15 ms if my Starlink used the Wi or MI ground stations.

I would say it's not the latency that "kills" Starlink for time-sensitive protocols, but the jitter; the wide swings in latency from 15 additional milliseconds on up to 50-60 ms.
All in all the math does work. And in simple terms Starlink will always beat the pants off of TRIA Internet providers. It's easy to understand. 22 up, 22 down to the earth station and 22 & 22 for packet travel distance. Right? That's 88k miles the way TCP/IP has to work. UDP may be a little different. BUT.
No matter what. Unlimited data. Read back a bit.
My friends who's only choice is a TRIA (Hughesnet) system for Internet have to be VERY careful of data usage.
They put up hunters for a week and in a flash their data was used up. Slammed in the face and capped.
"Until the next billing cycle". They never can stream Netflix.
For around the same price that Starlink is charging for monthly service. For unlimited data versus... forget about it.
It doesn't come to light until you realize where I live. The headquarters of the defunct Adelphia and now Zitomedia.
Many times I've consulted with clients who have had their "High Speed Broadband" since conception and before streaming services and devices flooded the market.
The sail right along (but have "That Spinny Thing") often while watching Netflix, etc.
Then right around the middle of the month their service screws up. So they call and a field tech is dispatched.
He comes out. Snips the old RG connector. Crimps on a new one. Checks signal. And takes off.
SOMETIMES. To retain the customer they disable the cap that was turned on when they reached the data limit.
But they don't tell the customer what voodoo is going on to make the problems go away.
That is 100% a fact.
Comes to find out that they have had the same service since inception. And were "Grandfathered" into a plan that isn't even offered any more. The old 10 MBPS plan with "X" (piddly amount of) data.
A phone call to discover that the "High Speed" plan is something not even sold any more.
And a modem with 4 down and 2 up that even customers who discover the next up plan is 50 MBPS can only get MAYBE 18-20 download speeds. The are never told they need to swap the modem.
It's even worse if they have their VOIP service.
Bottom line? Tell customer service to wipe the old plan off the face of the earth. A Wally World 16 down/8 up Arris modem in hand. Provision it for the 50 MBPS plan. And save 10 bucks a month.
The modem they payed for monthly as rent from the ISP was bought time and time again.
So any satellite Internet provider should be paranoid of Elon. Because they got used to raking in the bucks from people who had no option. Monopoly of crappy service and having to pay out the wazoo for better.

I Wonder 2 things. Could you strap a Dishy on top of your camper and hit the highway and stream or game or watch YouTube while eating up a gallon of gas every 6 miles? Would you need some sort of whatever Dish or Direc makes you do "plan" to mobilize your Dishy?
And could you watch your favorite streamed program when it rains like the dickens or is moderately snowing?
User input invited for that one.
Rant over. lol!
 

NYDutch

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Dec 28, 2013
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...

I Wonder 2 things. Could you strap a Dishy on top of your camper and hit the highway and stream or game or watch YouTube while eating up a gallon of gas every 6 miles? Would you need some sort of whatever Dish or Direc makes you do "plan" to mobilize your Dishy?
And could you watch your favorite streamed program when it rains like the dickens or is moderately snowing?
User input invited for that one.
Rant over. lol!
Starling user terminals are currently geolocked to a small area, but mobile use is in the works. An application has been submitted to the FCC for future mobile/marine use.

According to Starlink users on Reddit, the service has held up well in rain and snow storms. One user with a temporary install reported the antenna blew over in high winds, but the service kept on working, albeit somewhat intermittent with reduced speeds.
 

brad1138

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Mar 20, 2006
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Red Dwarf
We (I) have installed Viasat since it was 1st introduced as Wild Blue 15 or so years ago.
After learning about and then installing a few Starlink systems, it was easy to see more traditional "satellite" internet is toast.

We have been having a hard time dealing with all the crap Viasat comes with lately, and in good conscience, we won't sell it anymore. We tell people about Starlink, and to contact us if they need help installing it. Most don't.
 
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NYDutch

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I haven't had any calls yet about doing a Starlink install, but a friend of mine has done three so far, including his own. One of the other two only called him for help in routing the wire from the dish through a brick wall, and the other one was a 75 year old widow that wanted the dish mounted on her rear patio roof. She had it operating temporarily on her front lawn when he got there, but wanted it hidden from view from the road.
 

brad1138

SatelliteGuys Pro
Mar 20, 2006
1,117
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Red Dwarf
I haven't had any calls yet about doing a Starlink install, but a friend of mine has done three so far, including his own. One of the other two only called him for help in routing the wire from the dish through a brick wall, and the other one was a 75 year old widow that wanted the dish mounted on her rear patio roof. She had it operating temporarily on her front lawn when he got there, but wanted it hidden from view from the road.
It is pretty much like "installing" a tailgater.... You can just set it on the ground and it finds signal in under a minute. Mounting it to the roof and drilling 3/4 inch hole are only thing someone might want help with.
 
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NYDutch

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It is pretty much like "installing" a tailgater.... You can just set it on the ground and it finds signal in under a minute. Mounting it to the roof and drilling 3/4 inch hole are only thing someone might want help with.
Yep, I'm familiar with the mounting options. I just haven't had occasion to install any yet. I'll probably see a little more action when the mobile versions are available.
 

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