FCC Replacing BUD for those with protected status.

goaliebob99

goaliebob99

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I filed to have my BUD protected back when the FCC was asking for it about a year back when FCC was asking for those seeking protection. I imagined I would eventually get a filter, but was presently surprised when I was told my mesh dish would be upgraded to an aluminum at no cost. Anyone else getting thier's replaced by the FCC? Almost seems too good to be true.
 
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johnnynobody

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I filed to have my BUD protected back when the FCC was asking for it about a year back when FCC was asking for those seeking protection. I imagined I would eventually get a filter, but was presently surprised when I was told my mesh dish would be upgraded to an aluminum at no cost. Anyone else getting thier's replaced by the FCC? Almost seems too good to be true.
I never heard of this.
 
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kofi123

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I never heard of this.
More info here: https://www.satelliteguys.us/xen/threads/register-your-cband-dish.376185/. The filing window for registering a C-band dish closed on October 31, 2018.

I bet I know what happened. The FCC had expected the C-band spectrum auction to raise about $50 billion, but the actual amount raised ended up being nearly $81 billion. They always intended to use a portion of the proceeds to pay for the cost of installing new LNBs and filters on registered C-band dishes. Given the unforeseen amount of money raised, though, they may have decided they could afford to replace entire satellite dishes instead in some cases.
 
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radio

radio

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And, they gave the option to (at least broadcasters) to take a buyout and make modifications on our own to keep our existing dishes going. Since filtering is all we are expected to need, the buyout (being paid to handle it ourselves) was the better option. Otherwise, they'd send someone from the company that owns the satellite we are using to modify our dish at no cost. The buyout is a little over 8 thousand per registered dish.
 
FTA4PA

FTA4PA

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I remember when info about doing this was posted on Satellite Guys a while back. Many of us, including myself, did not trust registering our dishes because we thought there must be a catch. Guess it was legit after all. :(

EDIT: Found the original thread about it: Register your cband dish!
 
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johnnynobody

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I remember when info about doing this was posted on Satellite Guys a while back. Many of us, including myself, did not trust registering our dishes because we thought there must be a catch. Guess it was legit after all. :(

EDIT: Found the original thread about it: Register your cband dish!
Unless it's more than a LNB(F) changeout, it doesn't really matter. I can afford a $100 or even $200 LNBF. But, my days are numbered as to whether I continue with BUD's - unless someone starts selling AFFORDABLE consumer grade antennas again. Anyway, these days, it's best not to volunteer personal info unless you want to risk that info being abused.
 
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radio

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If you're referring to the FCC and personal info, there was never a worry but, I can respect non-broadcasters being a bit wary. The FCC is GOOD at security of their info. The best proof that the "Cband buyout/protection" program was that attorneys who handle FCC issues for broadcasters were doing the paperwork at a cost, but well worth it to get it RIGHT. The protection for Cband was something the FCC offered, aimed mainly at professional users like our station, but they did not rule-out consumers, to the best of my knowledge. And, in this poster's opinion, aside from the wonderful things Titanium is marketing, all of which have been great for me, when it comes to looking for a BUD, I'd always look for a good, used, un-loved one in someone's yard and re-deploy it with updated electronics. There's so many better-built ones out there. My favorites being Birdview..but many other quality ones are "out there" vs. new. I've not run into spacing or other signal issues (yet) reusing older dishes.
 
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Fortunately that is not what the FCC said to us.. and...after 16 years of owning radio, I can honestly say only a few small things in terrestrial FCC-regulated issues have I had issue-with. (mainly things I can't really have much of a voice-in even with letters of public comment) ...but under Mr. Pai BROADCASTERS did get a better voice than we've had in many a year, and if they (FCC) want to pay me for owning two registered dishes, I'll cash that check so fast the bank's head will spin. If they don't, at least 5G won't operate in my rural neighborhood until they protect me. The same applies to literally hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of broadcasters and cable systems.. whether they opted to have their sites "fixed" by the satellite owner to properly work WHEN this happens, or whether they took the buyout to do it themselves. I think it's overpayment, too..but, I'll happily accept that check and reinvest in my station. The FCC will HAVE to follow-through. Can you imagine the fury of thousands of stations NOT being protected one way or another when it comes to programming they receive through satellite dishes from networks with which they hold contracts for carriage? Yes, there were terms of the "deal" but...most broadcasters took either scenario as an equitable way to keep using dishes for the programming they choose. Certainly a more reliable option than relying on public internet for the receipt of most programming. I was skeptical too about the options put to us, but at the point where we hired our FCC attorneys handle certain forms for this, it became real. I have two large dishes personally on the same site but did not have them registered...only the company ones. At registrarion of $500-ish per for fees plus FCC attorneys, THAT was enough. My personal ones I can deal with over time...IF a signal issue arises which it may not in this location.
 
johnnynobody

johnnynobody

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great for me, when it comes to looking for a BUD, I'd always look for a good, used, un-loved one in someone's yard and re-deploy it with updated electronics. There's so many better-built ones out there. My favorites being Birdview..but many other quality ones are "out there" vs. new. I've not run into spacing or other signal issues (yet) reusing older dishes.
I've looked around at unused BUD's here and all of them have hail damaged mesh. There were some 6 footers that were solid but I'm not interested in those.
 
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With more (small market) stations relying on internet for programming (not my first choice, but it happens) you might check with one or two in your area if you're LUCKY enough to have private ownership of any stations. They may have dishes not being used. I now use a large mesh commercial dish, and have abandoned (but have as emergency backup) my Scientific Atlanta big monster. Not one designed for sky scanning, , but as a fixed dish, it's amazing. Can't ever hurt to ask...and if you're in an area that gets snow (I didn't look atyour profile)...a good clue would be if the dishes are cleaned out after a decent dumping of the white stuff. If not, chances are they're not in use...(I don't always clean out my personal ones, but the ones for the radio station have to be functional unless it's so deep I can't get to one of them without major trudging/) Can't hurt to look...and to ask!
 
KE4EST

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I got my best 10-footer from a local AM station that went to Fiber. BTW it was free as long as I took it down and completely removed it and did no damage to the area. I had to remove it from the transmitter site.
 
wvman

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I remember when info about doing this was posted on Satellite Guys a while back. Many of us, including myself, did not trust registering our dishes because we thought there must be a catch. Guess it was legit after all. :(

EDIT: Found the original thread about it: Register your cband dish!
Has anyone actually seen channel losses due to the 5G takeover of part of the C-Band spectrum? So far, I've seen none, but a lot of you folks frequent satellites I don't use.

I am not bilingual, so there's a lot of channels that do not interest me. I mainly stick to the mainstream channels like MeTV, Grit, Laff and several others. I keep one of my 8 dishes mobile in order to look for other channels that might peak my interest.

I use Galaxy 16, 19, C3, SES 1, Galaxy 17, 15 and a couple others. So far, I haven't seen any loss of channels due to the 5G crap that only benefits people in the population centers.
 
FTA4PA

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Channels leave but no way to attribute it to just 5G as it happens all the time anyway in the world of FTA.
:rolleyes
But no, I haven't seen any of the 'major' FTA channels go away.
 
radio

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We hobbyists are used to rescanning for channels...and for places like our radio station, services like Townhall News will reprogram their digital receivers which will then just "follow" any moves. I haven't checked, but it's possible that the "pro" audio feeds may have already moved to the (remaining, eventually) part of the band. We've been told by our network that this is not an issue....as long as our dishes are compliant via filtering as needed.
 
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Need2learn

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I filed to have my BUD protected back when the FCC was asking for it about a year back when FCC was asking for those seeking protection. I imagined I would eventually get a filter, but was presently surprised when I was told my mesh dish would be upgraded to an aluminum at no cost. Anyone else getting thier's replaced by the FCC? Almost seems too good to be true.
wow thanks for spreading the word now geez why didn’t you say something back then?
 
radio

radio

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This was discussed on Satelliteguys in plenty of time for individuals and broadcasters to do research, AND nobody knew what "protection" was going to be comprised-of at the time. All we knew (including broadcasters) was that SOME form of non-interference from new technology would be offered IF we paid our $500 to the FCC for registering the dishes, and in some cases, an FCC attorney to file. In essence, it was not "free" to anyone...it was protection "up to the FCC" to decide how they'd help us with attached filing costs.
 
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TNGuy84

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Has anyone actually seen channel losses due to the 5G takeover of part of the C-Band spectrum? So far, I've seen none, but a lot of you folks frequent satellites I don't use.

I am not bilingual, so there's a lot of channels that do not interest me. I mainly stick to the mainstream channels like MeTV, Grit, Laff and several others. I keep one of my 8 dishes mobile in order to look for other channels that might peak my interest.

I use Galaxy 16, 19, C3, SES 1, Galaxy 17, 15 and a couple others. So far, I haven't seen any loss of channels due to the 5G crap that only benefits people in the population centers.
Actually the C-band frequencies that are being taken should include rural areas as well as population centers. I remember reading up on the AT&T Long Lines (The strange looking horns on communication towers) that used C-band frequencies prior to satellite to distribute communications across the U.S. Those were placed in both rural and urban areas to distribute signals effectively. If they could do that then, I don't see why it can't be done everywhere now. The only viable 5G at the moment is the 600MHz band because all of that other stuff in the 30GHz can barely travel any distance before being blocked out.
 
907TECH

907TECH

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Actually the C-band frequencies that are being taken should include rural areas as well as population centers. I remember reading up on the AT&T Long Lines (The strange looking horns on communication towers) that used C-band frequencies prior to satellite to distribute communications across the U.S. Those were placed in both rural and urban areas to distribute signals effectively. If they could do that then, I don't see why it can't be done everywhere now. The only viable 5G at the moment is the 600MHz band because all of that other stuff in the 30GHz can barely travel any distance before being blocked out.
When TVRO systems started coming out, the terrestrial microwave shots caused a lot of problems with satellite reception. It was a nightmare, they did not coexist well. 5G is viable at the higher frequencies it is on the way.
 
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