FCC Says you CAN put up that antenna - HoA can't stop you (FCC OTARD reference)

Discussion in 'Over the Air TV By RabbitEars.Info' started by jayn_j, Oct 29, 2010.

  1. It's amazing you've been given permission to install a 10' dish where the FCC offers no protection and the "governing" body dislikes a 36" so much.

    Good job and good luck!
     
  2. *** WELCOME TO SATELLITEGUYS! ***
  3. The ARRL is working hard to get the Seante to pass the Amateur Radio Parity Act, which was passed by the House of Reps. on September 12th. Now it just needs the Senate.

    It forces H.O.A.'s and cities to allow outdoor antennas for radio amateurs. If it passes, you could just get a Ham Radio 'Technician' license and put an 'effective outdoor antenna'. The Ham bands are not that far from OTA frequencies, and run a broad range of the radio spectrum extending from around 1.8MHz to over 10 GHz.

    The idea is that amateur radio is a necessary part of the emergency communication infrastructure, and it requires antennas.

    If you are interested, read more about it here: http://www.arrl.org/amateur-radio-parity-act
     
  4. Well since im a contractor in the city and county I gotta know what i can and cant do. Ive learned over the years of how to argue with the local government here. Of course every place is different. Honestly had I not already planned to install a c-band dish on the site i might have fought to put the Ku dish where I originally wanted, but even though it is on the roof now i think its a better place overall. My advice is to consider your options and dont get angry or mad at whoever is telling you no, and if you really feel your right (and in most cases you will be) call the FCC and visit with them. I have to say i had a top notch experience myself.
     
    FTA4PA likes this.
  5. The only problem is that the compromise bill allows the HOA to reject an antenna due to "esthetics". That makes it very subjective and therefore a bill of questionable value.
     
  6. This has been a horrendous day for us with our HOA over a satellite dish. For seven years it was installed on the roof without any issue. The roofs were replaced this week and we were informed we couldn't put the satellite dish on the roof any longer since if invalidates the warranty. They also said it couldn't be installed on the siding which we understand. The only place that the satellite dish could be located to get a signal was on the exterior fence that exclusively surrounds our property. It is owned by the association, but we have exclusive access. No one else can use our fence or access our property since it is locked. There is an exterior fence beyond our exclusive fence surrounding the entire HOA property.

    Anyone have any ideas? They said we could put it on a pole, but then the height they restrict will not allow us to get a signal. I'm just disgusted at this point and thinking of filing a request for a review of the HOA restrictions to see of there HOA rules violate FCC/OTARD>
     
  7. Do you own the roof? If so, they can't say anything.

    - Trip
     
  8. sounds like the roof is community owned, although you could make a case if yours is the only unit below that roof.
    I originally posted the OTARD guidelines in my first post here. The FCC has since moved the page and unfortunately eliminated much of the specific content. The current pages are here (both the same):
    Installing Consumer-Owned Antennas and Satellite Dishes
    http://transition.fcc.gov/cgb/consumerfacts/consumerdish.pdf

    It says you can erect a dish. Since you have common ownership of the building, the can restrict to sections you exclusively control. The sheet also states they can have restrictions on doing mods that damage the structure. The example they give is putting lag screws into a deck. I think that puts them in their rights to disallow screwing it into the roof and siding. Is there any location where you can secure it non-permanently (i.e. U bolts, clamps, cargo straps, etc?

    The pole thing is trickier. They would need to show a safety hazard in order to restrict it. An arbitrary height restriction is not sufficient if it is necessary to receive a signal. How high are we talking about? The fence may be your best bet. How about a pole just inside the fence and slightly taller?