Finally a true 4K projector from JVC? (1 Viewer)

Ilya

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4K D-ILA “BLUEscent” projector from JVC


Coming to CEDIA 2016 | September 15, 2016
 

Ilya

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This one will likely be too expensive for most of us. But any competition to Sony is a good thing!
 

Ilya

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I think it's native 4K. We will know for sure in less than 2 weeks, when IFA opens in Berlin on September 2.
 

Ilya

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If you search jvc.com for "BLUEscent" you'll find verbage like this:
JVC's New native 4K projector. The New High-end 4K D-ILA BLUEscent Projector. Come and experience for yourself at IFA 2016...
So I am pretty sure it's native 4K. :)
 

tigerfan33

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I'll be curious of the lumen output.
I had the RS500 and it was much brighter than past JVC projectors.
The whole HDR thing on home projectors are nothing but a joke at this point imo.
Can't even get things right on a bright flat panel.
 

TheForce

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I have the Sony which is a true 4K panel set, but, honestly, all the programming I put through it except what I shoot with my 4K camera is 3840x2160. Everything for consumer seems to be released for UHD, not true 4K.

The big choice between DILA and SXRD projectors is the color subtleties. Can't explain it here but you should always view them so you know the look of the image and how these two technologies compare. The other one is DLP.

tigerfan- Agree completely on HDR. It's a mess to deal with. The BT2020 color gamut is also a problem but the player people are getting closer to resolving that. I have mine fairly well calibrated now. But I use a separate setup for Amazon UHD, Amazon HDR, Netflix, Netflix UHD ( don't have ap that supports Netflix HDR yet), UHD Blu Disk, and my DVR. It's nuts having to deal with so many standards. Thank God for programmable macros on the remote.
 

harshness

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I have the Sony which is a true 4K panel set, but, honestly, all the programming I put through it except what I shoot with my 4K camera is 3840x2160.
That's what's painted on the other side of the wall. What consumers need is UHD and what Sony offered was 4K; probably because it was a short hop from their movie theater offerings. From reading the review, I suspect the performance differences go beyond the fact that the 4K screen isn't UHD "native". I acknowledge that there's no tidy way to get from 4096 to 3840 but that's clearly not the consumer's fault.

The frustration is that they have to downconvert a 4K movie to UHD so you can have your TV upconvert it for viewing on a 4K screen.
 

TheForce

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so you can have your TV upconvert it for viewing on a 4K screen.

Fortunately, that's not how it works, (for projectors) Not sure how they handle the 4K TV sets

The Sony 4096 panel displays a 4096 image using the full panel area. With UHD 3840, there is unused side pixels that remain blacked out. There is no interpolation. With a JVC that uses UHD 3840 pixel panels, the whole panel is used, nothing wasted. If you try to display a 4096 pixel image size, the JVC does interpolate the 4096 to 3840 as opposed to cropping. They have a name for the process but I can't recall what it is.

There is some debate about whether a JVC has brighter image because the lamp light output is concentrated 100% on the full image while the Sony loses some light efficiency displaying a UHD image through a larger panel. Whether the JVC degrades the 4096 image or not is unknown, but my guess would be that it is not detectable. Sony's decision to use the commercial panels in their consumer projectors probably had more to do with simplifying inventory than any technical advantage, especially since there is so little 4096 content available.

Personally, I used optical zoom to expand my image width to the 3840 full screen width and if I ever do get a 4096 program, I would need to zoom down the image for it to fit on the screen.

Also, modifying the rendered output to a different resolution and even pixel aspect ratio is a very easy process in editing. I do it all the time. Even, can be done while playing back real time before rendering. The only time it gets dicey is if you try to upconvert a very low res image to higher resolution. Often, I use these edits as a picture in picture so the lower resolution clip is the smaller window and that helps hide the lower resolution content.
 

harshness

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There is some debate about whether a JVC has brighter image because the lamp light output is concentrated 100% on the full image while the Sony loses some light efficiency displaying a UHD image through a larger panel.
Or perhaps the JVC just has a stronger lamp.
Whether the JVC degrades the 4096 image or not is unknown, but my guess would be that it is not detectable.
My guess is that most will never have a significant opportunity.
Also, modifying the rendered output to a different resolution and even pixel aspect ratio is a very easy process in editing. I do it all the time.
The process is trivial, but that doesn't mean that it doesn't do perceptible damage. When the reduction isn't a nice round number, there's a certain running together of things. Fortunately, it happens at a level that the human eye isn't all that well equipped to discern so the brain will "rebuild" it.

There's an interesting series available on Netflix called Brain Games that visits the interaction between the eyes and the brains that addresses optical illusions and the brain's ability to make sense of input that isn't complete or right.
 

AKGolf

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I have the Sony which is a true 4K panel set, but, honestly, all the programming I put through it except what I shoot with my 4K camera is 3840x2160. Everything for consumer seems to be released for UHD, not true 4K.

The big choice between DILA and SXRD projectors is the color subtleties. Can't explain it here but you should always view them so you know the look of the image and how these two technologies compare. The other one is DLP.

tigerfan- Agree completely on HDR. It's a mess to deal with. The BT2020 color gamut is also a problem but the player people are getting closer to resolving that. I have mine fairly well calibrated now. But I use a separate setup for Amazon UHD, Amazon HDR, Netflix, Netflix UHD ( don't have ap that supports Netflix HDR yet), UHD Blu Disk, and my DVR. It's nuts having to deal with so many standards. Thank God for programmable macros on the remote.
I have the SONY VPLVW665ES set for our home theater unless something more reasonable comes out before our house is built.
 

Ilya

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

New JVC 4K D-ILA Projector Features Laser Light Source
For High Brightness and Long Life


DALLAS, September 15, 2016 – JVC today announced a 4K home theater projector that features a new native 4K D-ILA device and a laser light source with dynamic light control to deliver high brightness and high contrast images.

The new flagship JVC DLA-RS4500 combines a JVC-developed native 4K D-ILA device with the company’s proprietary BLU-Escent™ laser phosphor light source to deliver a brightness level of 3000 lumens and 20,000 hours of operational life. In addition, the new laser light source offers dynamic light source control for the highest native contrast available. To further ensure that the projector delivers bright, high-quality 4K images, it features HDR compatibility, a new high-resolution lens developed specifically for 4K applications, and a new Cinema Filter for a wide color gamut.

The main features of the new JVC DLA-RS4500 are:

1. Native 4096 x 2160 4K D-ILA Device

The new 4K D-ILA device used in the DLA-RS4500 is JVC’s latest and smallest 4K D-ILA device. The 0.69-inch device has a pixel gap of 3.8 ?, 31 percent narrower than the gap in earlier devices. Also, by using both vertical orientation technology and planarization technique, scattering and light diffraction have been decreased, which enhances contrast. The result is a smooth, detailed image with no visible pixel structure, even when using large screens. The DLA-RS4500 uses three of these new 4K D-ILA devices, one each for red, green and blue. and delivers 4096 x 2160 resolution.

2. BLU-Escent Laser Light Source

The light source for the DLA-RS4500 is JVC’s proprietary second generation BLU-Escent laser phosphor light engine, which uses blue laser diodes to offer a brightness level of 3000 lumens and 20,000 hours of operational life. The laser unit employs six banks of eight laser diodes to achieve its high brightness levels, and a stationary emissive phosphor, which reduces mechanical noise and enhances reliability. The high brightness allows the projector to be used with screen sizes over 200 inches and makes the most of HDR to deliver an image with depth and richness.

3. Dynamic Light Source Control

With its laser light source, the DLA-RS4500 can control laser output dynamically, adjusting output instantly based on the scene to provide bright whites, deep darks and brilliant colors. With its Dynamic Light Source Control, the DLA-RS4500 achieves a contrast ratio of ?: 1.

4. Wide Color Gamut

The combination of a laser light source and a new Cinema Filter allow the DLA-RS4500 to achieve a wide color gamut of 100 percent DCI P3 and over 80 percent coverage of BT.2020. This allows subtle gradations, such as of the sky or the sea, to be vividly reproduced.

5. New High Resolution Lens

Developed in conjunction with the new 4K D-ILA device was a new 18-element, 16-group all-glass lens with full aluminum lens barrel. A new 100mm diameter lens is used for best light efficiency and to project 4K resolution to every corner of the screen. This compares to 65mm diameter designs used in other JVC projectors. The new lens offers an expanded shift range of ±100 percent vertical and ±43 percent horizontal. In addition, by adopting five anomalous dispersion lenses we are able to reduce chromatic aberration and color fringing to deliver precise projection of 4K resolution graphics.

6. HDR Compatibility

HDR (High Dynamic Range) content offers an extended brightness range, 10-bit gradation and wide BT.2020 color gamut, which place high demands on display devices. With its high contrast ratio, 80 percent BT.2020 coverage, dynamic light source control and high brightness, the DLA-RS4500 gets the most out of HDR images. When the projector detects an HDR signal automatically selects the correct picture mode preset based on HDR10. The DLA-RS4500 also offers Hybrid Log-Gamma, a new HDR standard for broadcasts and streaming services.

7. New Design

The DLA-RS4500 features an all-new cosmetic design, with a symmetrical cabinet that combines aluminum and matte black paint for a luxurious appearance while also reducing reflections. The center-mounted lens is set off from the black body by a gold alumite ring. For cooling, the rear intake/front exhaust fan adapts to the installation environment to maximize its effectiveness, and it employs a professional level air filter that can withstand severe conditions.

Other Features

  1. The DLA-RS4500 is undergoing relentless THX laboratory testing to become the world’s first THX Certified 4K projector. (pending certification)

  2. Two full speed full spec 18Gbps HDMI inputs with HDR and HDCP2.2

  3. JVC’s Multiple Pixel Control employs a new algorithm optimized for the new 4K device to produce detailed images even when converted from Full HD images.

  4. The DLA-RS4500 features JVC’s original blur reduction technology, Clear Motion Drive, which is compatible with 4K60p (4:4:4), and Motion Enhance, which minimizes motion blur by optimizing the D-ILA driver. These two technologies, working together, result in a smooth and detailed image.

  5. Onboard Screen Modes that optimize color and performance for different screen materials.

  6. Low Latency Mode, which decreases input lags from the source.

  7. Ten preset installation modes that combine settings for Lens Memory, Pixel Adjust, Screen Mask and other parameters to easily tailor settings to each installation.
The JVC DLA-RS4500 Reference Series projector will be available in December for $34,999.95.

More information is available on the DLA-RS4500 web page.
 

mike123abc

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I went to the demo at CEDIA. It was pretty good. No the "black bars" on wide screen were not black. It only has "120k:1" native contrast. They did not seem to have the completely fade to black feature enabled during the demo. They were using a 16x9 foot screen, so it was pretty big. The brightness was excellent, even on that big a screen in a light controlled room.

I would love to have one!
 
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