Grounding the antennas (1 Viewer)

andrzej

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Supporting Founder
Feb 18, 2004
690
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Boston subs
Voomers,
how is your sat and OTA antennas grounding done? On my D* install the coax from the dish goes to a small metal plate in my basement and a grounding wire is connecting the plate and a cold water pipe. On my Voom install I have a triple cable (2 coax and 1 grounding attached). On the roof end one coax goes to OTA one goes to Sat and the grounding cable is attached to one of the bolts on the OTA arm. There is also a short grounding cable connecting the bolt on the OTA arm and one of the bolts on the Sat arm. The triple cable enters my basement and the grounding wire is connected to the same metal plate as the D* grounding wire.

I am wondering whether my intermittent problems with both StarzHD and 4 other channels with different polarity (described here: http://www.satelliteguys.us/showthread.php?t=10172) have anything to do with this grounding setup. Any thoughts?
 

owlbox

SatelliteGuys Pro
Mar 18, 2004
223
0
MA
Not likely, but I don't think that grounding you describe meets electrical building codes.
 

Lobstah

SatelliteGuys Pro
Mar 6, 2004
444
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I don't either. In my area, I have a 6or 8' grounding rod that sticks up out of the basement floor over in the corner. Sticks up about 2'. Cold water pipes are a bit "iffy" I think. Pretty easy to test to see if that's your problem though? Drive a rod in the ground, pour some salt water around it, and hook up the antenna grounds to it, then see if the problem dissappears?

Lob
 

FunkyBoss

Pub Member / Supporter
Mar 23, 2004
753
1
Chicagoland, IL
Since my install is tomorrow, how can I tell if they ground it correctly? I don't have any grounding rods in my basement. That I know of at least ;)
 

Mike500

SatelliteGuys Pro
Sep 7, 2003
1,338
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Thiepval
Lobstah said:
I don't either. In my area, I have a 6or 8' grounding rod that sticks up out of the basement floor over in the corner. Sticks up about 2'. Cold water pipes are a bit "iffy" I think. Pretty easy to test to see if that's your problem though? Drive a rod in the ground, pour some salt water around it, and hook up the antenna grounds to it, then see if the problem dissappears?

Lob

Don't use salt. It will degrade the ground by corroding the drounding rod. The entire 8 ft of the rod must be buried to meet with Article 250, 2002 NEC.
 

slick1ru2

SatelliteGuys Pro
Mar 29, 2004
626
21
The South
Call your local building inspector office to see if what your installer did meets code. They are checking to see if the D* installer's use of an outside faucet is OK and are getting back to me. The National Electric Code is the guideline.
 

PSB

On vacation
Nov 5, 2003
0
4
I like it, heres a good site to see if your install has been done right, this site will get better in time, they will be adding the state license requirements for each state then there will be NO EXCUSE for customers! They should know their law and insist on getting a SBCA 1+2 certified and STATE LICENSED installers ONLY. If everyone starts to turn away the flakes at the door or better still at time of schedule things will change in a HURRY.

www.dbsinstall.com
 

JaydeeD

SatelliteGuys Pro
Nov 30, 2003
194
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No ground at all here, after two different installers.....as I reported before in december, i had to do the entire install myself because the installer just walked away after not being able to find the satellite, I remounted the dish, aimed it and did my own OTA install

anyway, I doubt a ground would make a difference, i notice on that DBS install link that the ground from the dish is supposed to be connected to the house ground, and I don't have one. The ground wire from the power line comes into my outside fuse box and just stops, its not connected to anything, and those power line testers when plugged anywhere into my house always say "no ground"
 

andrzej

Thread Starter
Board Certified User
Supporting Founder
Feb 18, 2004
690
0
Boston subs
The reason that made me think about grounding is what Wilt said in a private email about my missing channels problem. He said: "Believe it or no it's as simple, if it's what I think it is, as a marginal voltage drop situation." I dunno...
 

PSB

On vacation
Nov 5, 2003
0
4
If all else fails a satellite type surge protector is about all you can do other than a rewire : ( Its better than nothing.
 

andrzej

Thread Starter
Board Certified User
Supporting Founder
Feb 18, 2004
690
0
Boston subs
PSB said:
If all else fails a satellite type surge protector is about all you can do other than a rewire : ( Its better than nothing.

And what is a "satellite type surge protector"? I use a Brickwall unit for my HT gear.
 

Digitude

Active SatelliteGuys Member
Apr 6, 2004
19
0
Grounding your antennas will not likely improve reception. Nor will a 10 gauge conductor dissipate a lightning strike. The purpose of an antenna or tower ground wire is to bleed off any static charge that may attract a lightning strike in the first place. According to NEC, if you use a separate ground rod then it needs to be bonded (tied back to) any and all existing ground nodes, rods or plates so that there is no difference of potential between grounds. Any difference of potential between two electrical points can develop a voltage. While it may not be enough to hurt you it can cause noise and 60 Hz hum. As for water pipes....a copper water main is usually a pretty good ground. It may not meet Code in some states. Refer to NEC Article 810 for Radio and Television equipment.
 

Lobstah

SatelliteGuys Pro
Mar 6, 2004
444
0
Regarding water mains, that very much depends on the specific house/home. In my house, the only water pipe that leaves the house is black plastic...which runs out to my well. Also, water pipes are notorious for condensation/corosion issues, so a ground connection that's good today, may be faulty tomorrow, which is why I wouldn't use one.

Just my $.02...

Lob
 

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