Guidance On Coaxial Cable (1 Viewer)

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Troy Simpson

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May 27, 2014
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I want to learn more about the various flavors of Coaxial and understand their specification differences. Anyone know where I can find more information on this topic?

For example, I have discovered that there are numerous types of RG-6, like copper clad steel with aluminium shielding (single, double, quad) and a copper center and copper shielding. Then there is various percentage of shielding like 40%, 60%, 85%, 95%, etc. Where can I go to understand what is the best solution for my specific applications. Where do I start?

It would seem to me that RG6 with a copper center and copper shielding would be the best cable for satelite TV, cable tv, and broadband. So why so many variations?

Thanks,
 
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Troy Simpson

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Great Informational Video. Hard to find good videos like this one. I assumed that there would be a good, better, best in RG-6. I had presumed that CCTV Cables with a copper center conductor and a high percentage copper braid could be used to pre-wire my home and be versatile for use with about anything I would do later on. Is this not true?

Where/How can I learn more?

Thanks,
 

Don in CT

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You want RG-6 or higher for HD. The thinner wire can't handle the signal. 75 ohm is what you need for CATV.

From the wiki
The most commonly recognized variety of RG-6 is cable television (CATV) distribution coax, used to route cable television signals to and within homes, and RG-6 type cables have become the standard for CATV, mostly replacing the smaller RG-59, in recent years. CATV distribution coax typically has a copper-clad steel (CCS) center conductor and a combination aluminum foil/aluminum braid shield, typically with low coverage (about 60%). RG-6 type cables are also used in professional video applications, carrying either base band analog video signals or serial digital interface (SDI) signals; in these applications, the center conductor is ordinarily solid copper, the shielding is much heavier (typically aluminum foil/95% copper braid), and tolerances are more tightly controlled, to improve impedance stability
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RG6
 
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Troy Simpson

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May 27, 2014
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You want RG-6 or higher for HD. The thinner wire can't handle the signal. 75 ohm is what you need for CATV.

From the wikihttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RG6

Yes, I understand that I need RG-6 or higher for HD, but what RG-6 cable do I need to go with? The video describes at least 4 types of RG-6. There is RG-6 CCTV, RG-6 SDI, RG-6 CATV, RG-6 Quad-Shielded CATV. And I know there are probably more RG-6 Types.

It appears the RG-6 CCTV that is shown in the video does not have a foil shielding, but only a 95% copper braid, so maybe this is not good for my purpose to use in the house.

It seems like the RG-6 SDI that is described in the video might be the best solution, but I just do not know.

Thanks again for all your help.

Sincerely,
 

Troy Simpson

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Just found this video about SDI:

What is SDI cable ?

Serial digital interface [SDI] standard is based on a 270 Mbps transfer rate, over a single 75 ohm coaxial cable [BNC connector], up to 600 feet. Serial Digital Interface is a [standard definition] digital broadcast television standard providing a lossless digital encoding of standard NTSC and PAL formats [with embedded audio]. SDI is used in Television stations, cable channels, and professional production Equipment. SDI provides a method for transmitting uncompressed digital video, audio and other data between video devices.
 

Don in CT

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Just found this video about SDI:

What is SDI cable ?

Serial digital interface [SDI] standard is based on a 270 Mbps transfer rate, over a single 75 ohm coaxial cable [BNC connector], up to 600 feet. Serial Digital Interface is a [standard definition] digital broadcast television standard providing a lossless digital encoding of standard NTSC and PAL formats [with embedded audio]. SDI is used in Television stations, cable channels, and professional production Equipment. SDI provides a method for transmitting uncompressed digital video, audio and other data between video devices.
SDI is the interface, not the cable itself. It is really just clean uncompressed video. Unless you are a pro you don't need it.

I bought a spool of cable at lowes, I don't think it really matters what brand you get just make sure it is RG-6 or higher. Don't buy pre crimped cables either.
 

FaT Air

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Copper Clad is the "Norm" for RF distribution. Solid copper is better at powered systems where the power is sent down the coax, along with the RF. This is because of 'skin effect' where rf tends to only flow close to the surface of the conductor where low frequencies and DC flow 'in the depths' of the conductor.
Higher % of shielding is for exclusion of external interference being 'induced' into your coax (desired signal).
Double and Quad shielding is only necessary if there's extreme cases of external 'induced' interference.
In most ( 95+%) residential installation cases, RG-6 with 60% coverage, and 3Ghz rated will suffice.
 

Stargazer

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The most common I see these days is 3 GHZ (3000 MHZ). Quad shielding and solid copper center would offer the best that RG-6 has to offer. There will always be improvements in cables over time and fiber may be what a lot of things go towards in the future along with improvements in technology that will make existing coax be able to handle higher data speeds.

If rewiring a home is of concern then the best thing to do is run wires through tubing in case you want to replace the wire later on with something new that may come about. I even see offerings that have fiber, coax, phone, etc all in one sheathing for whatever you would want.
 
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Stargazer

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Sep 7, 2003
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Western WV
The most common I see these days is 3 GHZ (3000 MHZ). Quad shielding and solid copper center would offer the best that RG-6 has to offer. There will always be improvements in cables over time and fiber may be what a lot of things go towards in the future along with improvements in technology that will make existing coax be able to handle higher data speeds.

If rewiring a home is of concern then the best thing to do is run wires through tubing in case you want to replace the wire later on with something new that may come about. I even see offerings that have fiber, coax, phone, etc all in one sheathing for whatever you would want.
 

jayn_j

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I can sell for any price I want when it shows 0 availability. Plus it is for shipping in the UK. Best price I saw on that site for US stocked RG-6 was $358 for 500'
 

Troy Simpson

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Yes, you are correct that the "Availability is 0", but if the price is real, then why not put it on backorder and use it when it get delivered OR sell it for half of MSRP and still come out in the good. I have ordered items in the past with Available of 0 and that is not a real reason to not order something that can be used.
 

jayn_j

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Best of luck. In my experience, when something is a too good to believe deal, it is something that was on closeout and once it is gone, it will never be replentished. In addition, not sure what shipping terms and conditions are outside of the UK.
 

Troy Simpson

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Best of luck. In my experience, when something is a too good to believe deal, it is something that was on closeout and once it is gone, it will never be replentished. In addition, not sure what shipping terms and conditions are outside of the UK.

All very good points. Thanks for the feedback.
To find out what this was about, I placed an order for 1,000 meters (over 3,000 feet) for $13.00. Add in freight and tax and the total is $188.38 with a delivery date of sometime in late August. MSRP for this cable is over $1,000.
 
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