How can I know what frequency LNB's should i buy to catch a specific satellite? (1 Viewer)

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john_robot

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SatelliteGuys Pro
Feb 24, 2008
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Guys. How can I know what frequency LNB's should i buy to catch a specific satellite?
For example if you get KU band there are many LNB's with different frequencies out there such as

1- 10.95 to 11.70 GHz
2- 11.70 to 12.20 GHz
3- 12.25 to 12.75 GHz
4- 10.95 to 12.75 GHz

How do I decide the correct LNB that I need ? is there any kind of calculation you have to do to decide what frequencies supported LNB that I need?
 

john_robot

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Pro
Feb 24, 2008
188
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Ok Im trying to understand this, so if i have a TP 10982 V then I need LNB starts with 10.95 ?
If I have a TP 12590 V then I need this LNB 12.75 GHz

correct ?
 

rv1pop

SatelliteGuys Pro
Ok Im trying to understand this, so if i have a TP 10982 V then I need LNB starts with 10.95 ?
If I have a TP 12590 V then I need this LNB 12.75 GHz

correct ?
No! The frequency of the Local Oscillator (LO) in the LNB for most KU American satellites with most receivers is 10750 That frequency is "mixed" with the signal frequency to give the tuning frequency of the receiver. I cold go into a long explanation, but I would probably have to get out stuff I read / wrote 60 years ago and probably would be even more confusing.
 
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SatelliteAV

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Lifetime Supporter
Sep 3, 2004
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Roseville, CA
Guys. How can I know what frequency LNB's should i buy to catch a specific satellite?
For example if you get KU band there are many LNB's with different frequencies out there such as

1- 10.95 to 11.70 GHz
2- 11.70 to 12.20 GHz
3- 12.25 to 12.75 GHz
4- 10.95 to 12.75 GHz

How do I decide the correct LNB that I need ? is there any kind of calculation you have to do to decide what frequencies supported LNB that I need?
Ok Im trying to understand this, so if i have a TP 10982 V then I need LNB starts with 10.95 ?
If I have a TP 12590 V then I need this LNB 12.75 GHz

correct ?

That is correct. If you wish to view a transponder frequency of 10982 than you would need an LNB that tunes that frequency range. You also need to pay attention to the transponder polarity and match your LNB to be the correct polarity type, either linear or circular. You do not need to know the LNB's LO frequency when choosing the correct LNB as the LO is just the conversion frequency and only needs to be set to the corresponding frequency in the receiver menus.
 

john_robot

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Pro
Feb 24, 2008
188
4
ok great.. yeah I understand about polarity type. Tnx guys.

Universal KU LNB is good for any place it seems coz it covers 10.95 to 12.75 GHz
 

brentb636

SatelliteGuys Pro
Jun 24, 2006
4,278
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5 miles N of Saugatuck, Mi
Yes, but it also has it's disadvantages. Since it uses 22khz switching internally to change from low band to high band, that precludes using it in a matrix with other 22khz switched devices, like a 2x1 22khz switch, or a 4x4 or 4x8 multiswitch. Using a universal lnbf in it's full , two band mode makes for a unnecessarily long blindscan on sats over North America. I generally use my 4 output universal(9750/10600) as a single LO , 10600 Mhz 22khz ON lnbf, so it only scans the higher band. Every tp that I have seen in the low band ( below 11700 Mhz ) is in a beam not available to North American users. Hope this helps.
 

Anole

SatelliteGuys Master
Sep 22, 2005
11,819
10
L.A., Calif.
Standard KU LNB's use an L.O. of 10750
best for general Ku reception unless you need Atlantic satellites
(I'm on the west coast, and can't see 'em)

Universal KU LNB's use an L.O. of 9750-10600
If there are signals on Atlantic satellites you want to receive
(but mind the switching considerations listed above)

DBS LNB's use an L.O. of 11250
North American circular satellites
(not much found unencrypted on the pay satellites, any more)


In North America, we don't usually talk about LNBFs by their frequency coverage.
We just refer to their LO (local oscillator) frequency.
So, Standard and Universal are linear.
Circular is the top of the band, and unique.
 
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