How do I use a satallite dish as a UHF antenna?

ken2400

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Pro
Sep 4, 2004
1,221
80
Central NY State
I would like use a satellite dish as a UHF antenna.
I have old Primestar dishes, 18" dishes, offset Ku dish 36", C band 6' dish.
I was thinking of putting a bow tie antenna at the focal point.

I have one set of channels I want to get so this being directional is not big deal.

Anyone have any ideas?
Thanks
 

harshness

SatelliteGuys Master
May 5, 2007
16,218
2,503
Salem, OR
Dishes have never been the reflector of choice for OTA TV but some think they look cool so they dummy something up.

Radio Shack (and by extension, probably RCA) used to hide a UHF loop inside something that looked like a small plastic satellite dish on one of their indoor antennas. Other antennas had the dish but no loop.

The wavelength of channel 14 is a little over 25".
 

TheKrell

A mighty and noble race originating on Altair IV.
Pub Member / Supporter
Jan 4, 2007
26,124
19,392
Fairfax, VA
Radio Shack (and by extension, probably RCA) used to hide a UHF loop inside something that looked like a small plastic satellite dish on one of their indoor antennas.
I couldn't find a picture of that one. But this one is reminiscent of the wankel rotor! Kind of cool. Indoor HDTV & FM Radio Antenna I thought Radio Shack was completely dead and gone.

 
  • Like
Reactions: Foxbat and navychop

907TECH

SatelliteGuys Pro
Aug 29, 2018
191
211
Alaska
These dish looking indoor antennas are a joke. They are not dishes, just toys that make some people think they have secret sauce. Give up on the satellite dish idea, I suggest a conventional aluminum outdoor antenna with decent gain.
 

Jim5506

SatelliteGuys Master
Pub Member / Supporter
Lifetime Supporter
Oct 19, 2004
6,793
1,419
Lubbock, Texas
Channel Master made such an antenna, called the Parascope UHF antenna.

The reflector was very large (like 5-6 ft across) and two bow tie elements were placed at the focal point with a small reflector behind them to block direct reception of signal.

These antennas were very good, but not better than yagis by enough to make them commercially viable.

Comparing a Dish reflector at 1.5 ft diameter with an antenna 4 times the diameter (1/7th the surface area) that was perhaps 3 dB better than the best yagi tells me your Dish reflector antenna would be a poor performer compared to $50 antennas available today.
 

907TECH

SatelliteGuys Pro
Aug 29, 2018
191
211
Alaska
Another problem with parabolic UHF antennas is that they offer the most gain on higher frequencies, which no longer exist. They did make sense many years ago, not today. They had to be 6 feet or larger in size. When the 8 bay UHF antennas became more popular it was found they were as good or better than the parabolics, making dishes pretty much obsolete.
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 1, Members: 0, Guests: 1)

Top