Is CBand harder to work with than Ku? (1 Viewer)

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Eduardito

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Family
Jan 8, 2011
86
0
San Juan, Puerto Rico
With the loss of Venesat I am looking at NSS 806 to replace it. The thing is that while I've installed two antennas for Ku band (Hispasat and Venesat). I have no experience with C Band. It looks daunting, I mean right off the bat I might need a bigger antenna. I have seen some info on mini BUD so I will look into repurposing the new antenna I have for Hispasat towards the NSS 806 and the old smaller antenna that I had towards Venesat to Hispasat. The LNB does look to be more expensive too.
 

FaT Air

HOA Free Zone
Feb 27, 2010
6,668
913
97W 48N
Is it harder to work with? I'd have to say no, with a dish that's sufficient. Meaning, a weaker Tp close to the horizon, is going to usually going to require a bigger dish. Also, being published footprint maps cannot be guaranteed 100% accurate, all one can do is "try". Generally, it requires a minimum of a 6ft dish. Some have had success with a 1.2m dish on C band, but usually is limited to the strongest of TP's. The LNBF's are a little more expensive, but not that prohibitive. What size dishes you have there?
 

Anole

SatelliteGuys Master
Sep 22, 2005
11,819
10
L.A., Calif.
The dishes, mounts, motors, and other parts are bigger and heavier.
I agree the adjustment is a little less critical, but care is still worth taking, for best results.
As for expensive, this LNBF for C-band, doesn't seem bad to me (I have several).
 

mikekohl

Prehistoric Satellite Guru
Supporting Founder
Jun 4, 2004
762
153
Montfort, Wisconsin
NSS-806 is circularly polarized, so you really need a true circular feedhorn to allow the smallest possible antenna.
If you use a dielectric plate in either a C-band feedhorn or with an LNBF, it will help somewhat, but does not work as well as a true circular waveguide such as those found on the former ADL and Seavey Engineering circular feedhorns. You can use a dielectric plate type device, but with close frequency spacing on many channels of NSS-806, the lack of isolation from these devices will mean a sacrifice of one polarity over the other. (You won't get all channels; just the stronger ones, and which ones will depend upon how the polarity is skewed--favoring Left or Right hand circular. A solution is to use a larger antenna (8 or 10 feet in many cases), as a six footer will simply not pull in everything in this situation.
 

Eduardito

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Family
Jan 8, 2011
86
0
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Thank you guys. It actually does sound a little bit harder. lol. I will try to change the Hispasat to the smaller antenna tomorrow and use the 54 inch to try to get NSS 806.
 
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