LyngSat EIRP charts? (1 Viewer)

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RedSavina

Supporting Founder
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Aug 19, 2005
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Groton, CT
According to the LyngSat info for G16 @ 99ºW, most of the continental US falls within the 42 dBW curve for C-band. As I read the chart on the right, it seems to suggest a 55-95cm dish is needed to receive this C-band signal.

First question: Am I interpreting the graphic and chart correctly?

Second question: What are the conditions for this chart (clear sky, perfectly tuned dish, etc)?

Third question: When reading a chart such as this, what is a good rule of thumb for translating into real world performance?

Thanks and cheers!
Red
 
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qwert1515

SatelliteGuys TheList
Sep 26, 2005
4,244
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Los Angeles CA
According to the LyngSat info for G16 @ 99ºW, most of the continental US falls within the 42 dBW curve for C-band. As I read the chart on the right, it seems to suggest a 55-95cm dish is needed to receive this C-band signal.

First question: Am I interpreting the graphic and chart correctly?

Second question: What are the conditions for this chart (clear sky, perfectly tuned dish, etc)?

Third question: When reading a chart such as this, what is a good rule of thumb for translating into real world performance?

Thanks and cheers!
Red

The dBW -> dish size is probably for the minimum signal reception.

You need a well aligned dish (C-Band is quite forgiving).

The chart is only an estimation, and it should be treated that way, however it is fairly accurate but since some transponders are stronger than others it is not perfect as it gives an "average" of all the transponders.

I have a 1.2 Meter Dish and I can pick up some/most of G16 @ 99ºW.
 

mikekohl

Prehistoric Satellite Guru
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Jun 4, 2004
805
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Montfort, Wisconsin
While C-band can be quite forgiving and is rarely affected by weather except in the most extreme situations, you must remember that C-band satellites use 2-degree spacing. A 1.2 or 1.5 meter dish MAY work on some channels, and I would wager the ones that you are receiving do not have anything transmitting on an adjacent satellite with the same frequency.

Until you get up to 8 feet in diameter, one must worry about the possibility of a satellite 2 degrees away transmitting on a frequency that is close enough to cause problems or interference to what you are trying to receive. EIRP numbers should only be believed if you have perfect weather conditions and
there are no interfering transmissions on a nearby satellite. Otherwise a larger antenna should be considered in order to "future proof" your reception.
 

RedSavina

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Aug 19, 2005
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Groton, CT
qwert,

Thanks, glad I wasn't too far off in my understanding!

Do you know of a site with similar info by TP? I've read references to varying TP strengths but nothing concrete. I kind of figured it depends on location, but am not sure.

I am looking forward to jumping into FTA (finally) early next year. I have been researching my system components and have narrowed the list considerably. One area I'm still digging is the dish. I have a 90cm model in mind, but prefer a 1m model. Unfortunately I live in one of those neighborhoods that frown on dishes, so I have to stay with 1m or less - besides, I move every couple of years and have to plan around that.

I know miniBUDs tend to be 1.2m or so, but am willing to subject myself to loads of frustration on occasion to play with C-band if I can pull an occasional feed with a 1m dish.

I appreciated your response!
 

RedSavina

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Aug 19, 2005
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Groton, CT
mike,

Thanks - good points! Before attempting C-band I will be sure to check adjacent satellites as well as factoring in dish size.

BTW, I love your pages on hillbilly / multi LNB systems. How would you rate the Patriot dishes against the GEOSATpro dishes? A lot of people claim GEOSATpro are among the best; the Patriot dishes seem solid, too.

Cheers,
Red
 

qwert1515

SatelliteGuys TheList
Sep 26, 2005
4,244
40
Los Angeles CA
You must remember that C-band satellites use 2-degree spacing. A 1.2 or 1.5 meter dish MAY work on some channels, and I would wager the ones that you are receiving do not have anything transmitting on an adjacent satellite with the same frequency.

Thanks for pointing that out, I had forgotten about that.

Unfortunately the reception varies across the country for each transponder. I know there are a few channels that Scottc98 in Ohio can receiver that are just a little bit too weak for me on the West coast.

I remember reading that some people have been able to pick up a "few" channels with a 1 meter dish, most likely it will be a channel in a foreign language that you don't speak or a religious one since those signals always seem to be stronger than others.

There used to be a thread with over 10 pages about C-Band on smaller dishes, I can't find it, so this is the best I can give for now: Can I get anything with a 40 inch dish? (DREAMFOX1 has posted what he gets with a 39" dish)
 
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RedSavina

Supporting Founder
Supporting Founder
Aug 19, 2005
710
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Groton, CT
Cool! Just enough there to make me want to try it out. :D

First step is the Ku stuff, so I'll leave the miniBUD stuff on the back burner until I work through the Ku learning curve. Looks like I definitely need to shoot for the max allowable 1m dish to even have a chance.

Cheers,
Red
 
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