Minimum size for C-band Dish?

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Gary Z

Gary Z

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Jun 27, 2005
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Seguin, Texas
What is the minimum size for C-band Dish?

And how could of a signal would you get?

My zip is 78155
 
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Mr Tony

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Nov 17, 2003
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Mankato, MN
for most C-Band...at least a 6 footer

for subscription servcies (analog or digital), I'd say an 8 footer at aleast
 
Diamond Jim

Diamond Jim

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Aug 18, 2004
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The Boilermaker State (#19)
Iceberg said:
for subscription servcies (analog or digital), I'd say an 8 footer at at least

An 8 footer would be better if you decide to expand into all aspects of the satellite hobby. C and Ku analog, digital, DVB, 4:2:0, 4:2:2 and HD.

I recommend the 8 because if you get a 6 you will be happy, then you will find out all of the extra you could get with an 8. Then you will have to update which translates to more money. Buy the 8 right off the bat and all you will have to spend money on is receivers and LNBs to upgrade. You will not regret it.
 
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tvdxer

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Sep 6, 2004
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If you want to see most of what is up there and are in North America, you will want an 8-foot dish. This is not so much because the C-band satellites are weak as it is because they are spaced so closely (2 degrees). Smaller dishes that are not 2* compliant may pick up two satellites (or maybe even more) at once, causing interference and therefore rendering a signal unusable.

A smaller dish might work for some services (especially on the Atlantic Ocean Region satellites, which are NOT spaced at 2*), or for playing around with / experimenting. There was an article in Tele-Satellite international about two guys in Toronto with a 1.2 and 1m dish who were having some success picking up stuff, mainly on the Atlantic satellites, but such a dish will provide very unreliable reception for normal viewing.
 
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barney_555

SatelliteGuys Family
Jul 12, 2005
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Québec, Canada
tvdxer said:
If you want to see most of what is up there and are in North America, you will want an 8-foot dish. This is not so much because the C-band satellites are weak as it is because they are spaced so closely (2 degrees). Smaller dishes that are not 2* compliant may pick up two satellites (or maybe even more) at once, causing interference and therefore rendering a signal unusable.

A smaller dish might work for some services (especially on the Atlantic Ocean Region satellites, which are NOT spaced at 2*), or for playing around with / experimenting. There was an article in Tele-Satellite international about two guys in Toronto with a 1.2 and 1m dish who were having some success picking up stuff, mainly on the Atlantic satellites, but such a dish will provide very unreliable reception for normal viewing.

Is this Tele-Satellite article available somewhere on the web ?

Thank you.
 
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mrweather

SatelliteGuys Pro
May 27, 2006
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Toronto, Canada
My buddy has that particular issue and it's pretty cool what these guys have done.

They were using a special lnb with cone-shaped feed head(?). Even on cloudy/wet days their signal quality only dropped slightly.

No rain fade = the advantage of C band!
 
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rangers00

SatelliteGuys Family
Jan 25, 2005
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Just to get analog sport backhauls, a 4" (1.2M) is adequate. I hooked up the C-band LNBF on my 4' back in April, and just managed to get some NBA backhauls on IA-6 C-band before the end of the season.

The video has a few sparkles, but definitely watchable.
 
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