RG6 cable underground in PVC conduit

JimMac

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I need to run RG6 cable underground for 3 feet in PVC conduit. This is for our OTA antenna. I read that PVC conduit accumulates a lot of moisture inside from condensation. Should I drill small holes in the bottom of the conduit so it can drain out ?

Thanks.
 

norman881

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In 2013 I ran 3 100 foot pieces of RG6 through PVC conduit. I did not drill any holes and have had no issues.
 

Magic Static

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I have about 40 feet in conduit. I have pulled RG6 in and out of the conduit at times and I can say it does get wet in the conduit. I have no connection fittings in the conduit though and not had any problems.
 

waylew

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Really the only thing the conduit is for is to help protect the wires from stones and such.And to make it easier to run more or replace wires.
I've got a run of rg11 and actuator wires direct buried out to the 10'dish,been there well over 20 years,dish still moves,signal reaches the receivers.And it's maybe only 6 or 8 inches deep.
 
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boba

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I need to run RG6 cable underground for 3 feet in PVC conduit. This is for our OTA antenna. I read that PVC conduit accumulates a lot of moisture inside from condensation. Should I drill small holes in the bottom of the conduit so it can drain out ?

Thanks.
For 3 FT. of conduit just leave both ends open that short a length will evaporate with no problems.
 

st1

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I read that PVC conduit accumulates a lot of moisture inside from condensation. Should I drill small holes in the bottom of the conduit so it can drain out ?
Depends on whether your cable is PE (PolyEthylene) or PVC (PolyVinylChloride) shielded. PE is more expensive than PVC.
PE is the stifff black stuff (mostly), PVC the white bendy stuff (mostly).
PE-sheathing makes the cable moisture and sun-proof (well, to all extents and purposes), so you can actually dig it into the ground as-is.
PVC is susceptible to UV-deterioration and moisture (mostly because of cracks), and therefore only recommended for use *in-doors or in walls*.
(Amazingly, most out-door installation I've ever seen used PVC-clad cable...)

So if you use PE-sheathed (cost more), then it doesn't matter at all how moist it gets inside the tube. If you use PVC-sheathed, then the tube needs to be well-drained (difficult at that small scale), or acts as a moisture-tight canal, and you will need to provide open-ending for ventilation etc.

Having said that, I have had PVC cabling run through an open-ended 30ft flexible water-pipe for 10 years, with no problems. (I've learned since then, and do all outdoor in PE now).
So you might just get away with anything...
 

stardust3

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Can't believe nobody mentioned this but just use flooded cable. There is no way I'd drill holes in a conduit to let water out. Those same holes will let water in. Flooded cable direct buried or in an enclosed conduit is the only way to go, it's made for that purpose.
 

Radioguy41

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I ran approx 100' 17 years ago thru PVC to my shed on the hill where the antenna is mounted and have had no issues. I ran another 60' thru PVC for the FTA dish and another thru 30' for the C-band dish, all with no problems. Just make sure it's one long single run, no junctions or connectors. Drilling holes is actually a bad idea because it lets ground water into the pipe rather than providing an exit for condensation.
 
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stardust3

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May be a terminology thing.
What exactly is "flooded cable"?
Wiki says flooded cable is fitted with special gel to resist water seeping in though cracks. But what sheaths does it come with?
Flooded cable is a term referring to direct burial or underground rated wire. That type of wire used to be typically gel filled, now depending on the manufacturer some have a armored jacket without the need for gel. That's what I meant when I said flooded cable, cable meant for direct bury or underground rated.
 
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st1

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Flooded cable is a term referring to direct burial or underground rated wire. That type of wire used to be typically gel filled, now depending on the manufacturer some have a armored jacket without the need for gel. That's what I meant when I said flooded cable, cable meant for direct bury or underground rated.
Gotcha - that's exactly what I meant too (but without the gel).
 
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JimMac

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Thanks guys. The RG6 cable I'm using is quad shield and it's black. That's all I know right now. What should I use to seal the end of the conduit above ground ? Will 100% silicone work well ? I also have some of that waterproof, self sealing electrical tape.
 

st1

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What should I use to seal the end of the conduit above ground ?
Well regardless of whether the cable is PE or PVC sheathed, I would not recommend trying to seal off the conduit. Unless you have *really* airtight connections, you will most likely generate moisture in the conduit. I would think it would be better to ventilate, and make sure that any moisture evaporates. So I would advocate to have open ends, but with U-endings (with the opening pointing downwards).
 
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(((Garyd)))

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Can't believe nobody mentioned this but just use flooded cable. There is no way I'd drill holes in a conduit to let water out. Those same holes will let water in. Flooded cable direct buried or in an enclosed conduit is the only way to go, it's made for that purpose.
I always used flooded cable, and only ran it in 2 inch PVC were I knew heavy things would drive over it I even ran the flooded cable under a pond without an issue, that saved 100 feet of cable
 
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