The Official SatelliteGuys TV Repack Topic

Discussion in 'Over the Air TV By RabbitEars.Info' started by Trip, Apr 13, 2017.

  1. How many really care about the numbers of OTA viewers? Don't many stations view OTA as an undesirable, but required, expense?
     
  2. In what way does the repack give stations "more room"? It seems like any extra spectrum would be set aside for ATSC 3.0 testing and possibly this silly white space broadband experiment.
    The physics of broadcast doesn't seem to support giving lower frequencies the same power as higher frequencies. The engineers have to know better than to expect something like that to fly.

    I guess I don't see how anyone other than the broadcast hardware people win in this other than possible benefits of another across-the-board shuffle only a few years after the last one.
     
    jamesjimcie likes this.
  3. One of the goals of the repacking optimization was to minimize aggregate new interference. That had the side effect of moving stations apart wherever possible. So, for example, during the DTV transition, WUNC in Chapel Hill, NC went directional in order to fit on channel 25, co-channel with WTVR in Richmond. The repacking optimization was able to break up that relationship; WUNC is no longer co-channel with Richmond. While further study would be required, initial evaluation suggests that it should be able to, at the very least, let out its directional pattern, if not go completely omni once again.

    Many stations, though certainly not all, have more breathing room now than they used to.

    The rules say any UHF signal can go to 365m 1000 kW (or 1000 kW at a higher height, if there's a larger station already licensed). Therefore, while replication might have dropped KATU from 1000 kW to 678 kW when moved from channel 43 to 24, there's nothing in the rules stopping KATU from applying to go right back up to 1000 kW as long as it can cite another station in the market that's larger and it passes interference muster. (KOPB, for example, is larger.)

    - Trip
     
    jamesjimcie likes this.
  4. The Portland market is probably a poor example as it covers a lot of territory with a significant number of translators. The market is perhaps 250 miles across at its widest point and covers southwest Washington and a small oddly-placed part of Idaho.

    Due to two mountain ranges (Cascade Range and Coast Range), more power out of the Portland-area towers gets you mostly just a higher electricity bill.

    I'm thinking of the more common situation where stations are packed in much tighter or where one market has most of the frequencies tied up (like NYC or the SoCal situation).

    The move towards directional arrays surely isn't going to be appreciated by those who prefer OOM TV stations to their own.
     
    jamesjimcie likes this.
  5. I know this has been discussed before but I cannot find it. Where can I find a list of stations and/or markets and when they will change frequencies, shutdown etc.?
     
  6. I'm pretty sure you didn't miss it. We have the early time line at this point:

    Transition Schedule

    Suffice it to say that most of the moves will likely happen in 2019 through the fall of 2020 if everything goes ideally.

    As Trip noted in post #78, they're currently working on the first filing where stations try to negotiate for something different than what they were assigned (or an assignment for stations that didn't participate). As noted in post #80, there will be a second round of these before everything settles out and the playing field is set.