Thinking of going from DTV to DTV Stream...questions

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DaveKL69

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Jun 7, 2016
11
8
Beaver Dam KY
So if you have DirecTv Stream and you use AT&T internet, and say the internet goes down, can you have a backup internet, for example from your wireless phone setup as a backup in the system, where it would keep you from losing the connection. This is one thing that is making me hesitate on switching. Also does anyone know, if you are in a contract with DirecTv, which we are in our 2nd year, and switch to DirecTv Stream, do they fine you?
 
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comp9

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Jan 24, 2017
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So if you have DirecTv Stream and you use AT&T internet, and say the internet goes down, can you have a backup internet, for example from your wireless phone setup as a backup in the system, where it would keep you from losing the connection. This is one thing that is making me hesitate on switching. Also does anyone know, if you are in a contract with DirecTv, which we are in our 2nd year, and switch to DirecTv Stream, do they fine you?
Yes you can connect to your hotspot

They used to allow you out of your contract if switching to stream
 
Last edited:
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kovach

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Oct 24, 2006
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St. Louis
That difference can mostly be chalked up to what most folks would call junk channels (e.g. shopping, religious, foreign/cultural, etc.). Although some of the difference comes from the premium multiplex channels. Some of the secondary channels like HBO Signature, HBO Zone, and HBO Comedy are carried on satellite but not on DTV Stream. Same way with Showtime, Starz, and Cinemax.
~50 of those satellite channels are music only non-video channels; and as mentioned, tons of shopping, religious, and 2-feed channels that show the same thing a couple hours apart (the east/west coast feeds). If you subtract all of those from satellite, the number of channels comes pretty close.

That's assuming you don't like all the shopping/religious channels, if you do, Stream probably isn't your best choice, but I think the majority would rather not have or pay for them.
 
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kovach

Thread Starter
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Oct 24, 2006
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google 1 gig is 80.00 2 gig is 100.00 you might have to factor in modem and router rentals plus taxes and fee's
In my area, the options are Spectrum and AT&T.

Spectrum offers 200 mbps, 400 mbps, and 1 Gig, at prices (after initial promo rate) of $55, $75, and $115.

AT&T offers 300 mbps, 500 mbps, 1 gig, 2 gig, and 5 gig for $55, $65, $80, $110, and $180.

I think my Google nest wifi router mesh system only works up to 1 gig so I'm probably going to switch from my current Spectrum 400 mpbs to AT&T 1 gig, 2 1/2 times the speed for an extra $5 (and AT&T offers 1 gig both up and down; Spectrum's up speed is about 5% of it's down speed, at least in my area).
 
dtv757

dtv757

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I think they give you hbo max as part of the 1, 2 and 5 gig speeds!
 
dtv757

dtv757

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Mar 19, 2019
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757
In my area, the options are Spectrum and AT&T.

Spectrum offers 200 mbps, 400 mbps, and 1 Gig, at prices (after initial promo rate) of $55, $75, and $115.

AT&T offers 300 mbps, 500 mbps, 1 gig, 2 gig, and 5 gig for $55, $65, $80, $110, and $180.

I think my Google nest wifi router mesh system only works up to 1 gig so I'm probably going to switch from my current Spectrum 400 mpbs to AT&T 1 gig, 2 1/2 times the speed for an extra $5 (and AT&T offers 1 gig both up and down; Spectrum's up speed is about 5% of it's down speed, at least in my area).
Same with my area Fiber is much cheaper

Cable co:
250/10mbps - $80
500/10mbps- $100
"gig"/35mpbs- $120

Fios
300/300 $40
500/500 $65
900/880 -$90
 
Jimbo

Jimbo

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Jul 14, 2005
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Same with my area Fiber is much cheaper

Cable co:
250/10mbps - $80
500/10mbps- $100
"gig"/35mpbs- $120

Fios
300/300 $40
500/500 $65
900/880 -$90
Wow, wish I had those options here.
Like I've mentioned, here 100 on coax is $80, while 100 on fiber is $120, great incentive to go to fiber.
 
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NashGuy

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Mar 24, 2009
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Nashville, TN USA
Comcast is testing DOCSIS 4.0 in several markets delivering over 2Gbps So i am not referring to Gigabit Pro Tier
Uh, they may be *testing* it but D4.0 is nowhere close to being actually deployed and made available to subscribers. I'll be surprised if we see them offer it beyond small trial groups before 2024. Actually, even 2024 is optimistic. See this recent article.


Key quote:

The "end points" of the DOCSIS 4.0 network, including the customer premises equipment, could be a reality by 2024, with operators expected to spend about a year on testing, Jay Lee, chief technology and strategy officer of broadband access at ATX Networks, predicted during a panel discussion.

"I think by 2025 or 2026 we could see some serious ramp-up in upgrading HFC networks and deploying DOCSIS 4.0 equipment," Lee said.
 
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DaveKL69

Member
Jun 7, 2016
11
8
Beaver Dam KY
Just noticed tonight that DirecTV Stream states that Unlimited Cloud DVR Storage "Offer not available to DIRECTV and U-verse TV customers switching to DIRECTV STREAM." Which is a bummer for me, been planning to switch to DirecTV Stream due to the more affordable packages, but not having Unlimited Cloud DVR storage will mean I won't be going to DirecTV Stream. I guess I will wait to see what DISH is cooking up for their version of DirecTV Stream, and maybe go that route.
 
AMike

AMike

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Oct 25, 2010
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I have been a DirecTV customer on/off since 1999. I have been preparing for the inevitable switch to a streaming service. I have experimented with DirecTV stream, Fubo, and Comcast's stream to get a taste of options. Yesterday, I saw my bill from D* and for some reason it got to me. I decided that's it, I've had enough and I am going to make the switch. I make the call to D* to cancel and the retention person begins to sell me on DirecTV Stream. He told me that the best way to order is through the website to get unlimited DVR and discounts. He tells me that he is not trying to sell me on this (nudge, nudge). He then offers me a discount on satellite, but I decided, I think I'll cancel.

Of course, I took the advice and signed up for DirecTV stream. I just made sure I used a different e-mail address.
 
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mdram

SatelliteGuys Pro
Aug 24, 2005
4,042
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I have been a DirecTV customer on/off since 1999. I have been preparing for the inevitable switch to a streaming service. I have experimented with DirecTV stream, Fubo, and Comcast's stream to get a taste of options. Yesterday, I saw my bill from D* and for some reason it got to me. I decided that's it, I've had enough and I am going to make the switch. I make the call to D* to cancel and the retention person begins to sell me on DirecTV Stream. He told me that the best way to order is through the website to get unlimited DVR and discounts. He tells me that he is not trying to sell me on this (nudge, nudge). He then offers me a discount on satellite, but I decided, I think I'll cancel.

Of course, I took the advice and signed up for DirecTV stream. I just made sure I used a different e-mail address

i would be interested in how the 2 compare, as i am looking at doing the same thing in the next couple of months
 
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NashGuy

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Mar 24, 2009
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i would be interested in how the 2 compare, as i am looking at doing the same thing in the next couple of months
From posts around the web I've read by people who've switched from DTV sat to DTV Stream, I'd recap it like this:

  • HD picture quality is as good or even slightly better on Stream but Stream does not offer any 4K content at all.
  • While Stream does not suffer from rain/snow fade like sat, it is completely dependent on your internet connection. If your internet goes out, you can't watch anything, even your cloud DVR recordings. You'll want to make sure you have a solid wifi connection (or wired ethernet) at each of your home's TVs. One good thing, though, is that even if your internet goes out, your cloud DVR recordings will still happen on their servers and be waiting for you when your home internet comes back.
  • Stream has *nearly* all the same channels in a given package (e.g. Entertainment, Choice, Ultimate, Premier) as sat but it is missing a few (which may or may not matter to you). Be sure to check which locals you get (via their website, you put in your zip code) because in some areas the local CW and/or My Network TV and/or independent station (e.g. Chicago's WGN 9) is missing on Stream. Among national channels, Stream lacks NFL Network, INSP, ION, MeTV, shopping channels, religious channels, west coast feeds of national cable channels, and some of the secondary premium channels (e.g. HBO Signature, Showtime Women), in case any of that matters to you. Also note that DTV's Sports Pack, which contains out-of-market RSNs with the actual games blacked out (but still let you watch the pre- and post-game coverage, news/talk, etc.), is NOT available on Stream. Also, NFL Sunday Ticket is NOT available on Stream.
  • Stream's cloud DVR generally works well. Benefits are unlimited storage and unlimited "tuners," so you can record on as many channels at once as you like. Plus your recordings are accessible on any screen, in or out of home. Downsides are that recordings expire after 9 months, you're limited to a max of about 30 episode recordings per series, it doesn't do slo-mo playback, you can't build up a rewindable buffer on two different live channels at the same time (only on the single channel you're currently watching), and you can't customize recording times, for instance to extend them in case a sports event runs over. However, the Stream cloud DVR tries to automatically extend recordings for events/shows that run long. From what I read, it's a work in progress; sometimes it works, sometimes not. Another perk of the cloud DVR is that, for some sports, you can set it to record every game featuring a particular team.
  • A given channel package on Stream with free unlimited cloud DVR costs around 30% less than on sat with a single HD DVR. As you go up into more expensive channel packages, the savings increase. Likewise, the more sat TV boxes you rent, the greater the savings by going with Stream. But note that that's based on paying the full regular price for sat service. Lots of people get discounts, so you'll have to do your own comparison. When comparing, understand that the Choice and up packages (which include RSNs) do NOT have an RSN add-on fee with Stream but they do with sat. Also, be aware that if you sign up for Stream via their website, you get unlimited cloud DVR service included for free.
  • Some people love using the DTV Stream box and remote, which you can buy new for $120 or refurbished (same 1-yr warranty) for $50 at sign-up, because it has channel numbers and feels much more like using DTV sat. It makes for a very easy transition. Other folks are happier using the DTV Stream app on their Roku, Apple TV or Fire TV box/stick with a simpler remote. The Stream box is completely optional and you never rent them, you buy them. If you buy new for $120, you can finance it at zero-interest at $5/mo for 24 months with the remaining balance due if you cancel service before 24 months. Their box runs a customized version of Google's Android TV and has access to thousands of apps from the Google app store and has Google Assistant built in through the voice remote. Generally speaking, folks seem to say that the DTV Stream service itself works best on that box but the user experience with other streaming services (e.g. Netflix, HBO Max, etc.) is better on a retail streaming device (e.g. Roku, etc.). So it's a bit of a trade-off. May come down to how much you use DTV Stream vs. streaming apps.
 
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mdram

SatelliteGuys Pro
Aug 24, 2005
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From posts around the web I've read by people who've switched from DTV sat to DTV Stream, I'd recap it like this:

  • HD picture quality is as good or even slightly better on Stream but Stream does not offer any 4K content at all.
  • While Stream does not suffer from rain/snow fade like sat, it is completely dependent on your internet connection. If your internet goes out, you can't watch anything, even your cloud DVR recordings. You'll want to make sure you have a solid wifi connection (or wired ethernet) at each of your home's TVs. One good thing, though, is that even if your internet goes out, your cloud DVR recordings will still happen on their servers and be waiting for you when your home internet comes back.
  • Stream has *nearly* all the same channels in a given package (e.g. Entertainment, Choice, Ultimate, Premier) as sat but it is missing a few (which may or may not matter to you). Be sure to check which locals you get (via their website, you put in your zip code) because in some areas the local CW and/or My Network TV and/or independent station (e.g. Chicago's WGN 9) is missing on Stream. Among national channels, Stream lacks NFL Network, INSP, ION, MeTV, shopping channels, religious channels, west coast feeds of national cable channels, and some of the secondary premium channels (e.g. HBO Signature, Showtime Women), in case any of that matters to you. Also note that DTV's Sports Pack, which contains out-of-market RSNs with the actual games blacked out (but still let you watch the pre- and post-game coverage, news/talk, etc.), is NOT available on Stream. Also, NFL Sunday Ticket is NOT available on Stream.
  • Stream's cloud DVR generally works well. Benefits are unlimited storage and unlimited "tuners," so you can record on as many channels at once as you like. Plus your recordings are accessible on any screen, in or out of home. Downsides are that recordings expire after 9 months, you're limited to a max of about 30 episode recordings per series, it doesn't do slo-mo playback, you can't build up a rewindable buffer on two different live channels at the same time (only on the single channel you're currently watching), and you can't customize recording times, for instance to extend them in case a sports event runs over. However, the Stream cloud DVR tries to automatically extend recordings for events/shows that run long. From what I read, it's a work in progress; sometimes it works, sometimes not. Another perk of the cloud DVR is that, for some sports, you can set it to record every game featuring a particular team.
  • A given channel package on Stream with free unlimited cloud DVR costs around 30% less than on sat with a single HD DVR. As you go up into more expensive channel packages, the savings increase. Likewise, the more sat TV boxes you rent, the greater the savings by going with Stream. But note that that's based on paying the full regular price for sat service. Lots of people get discounts, so you'll have to do your own comparison. When comparing, understand that the Choice and up packages (which include RSNs) do NOT have an RSN add-on fee with Stream but they do with sat. Also, be aware that if you sign up for Stream via their website, you get unlimited cloud DVR service included for free.
  • Some people love using the DTV Stream box and remote, which you can buy new for $120 or refurbished (same 1-yr warranty) for $50 at sign-up, because it has channel numbers and feels much more like using DTV sat. It makes for a very easy transition. Other folks are happier using the DTV Stream app on their Roku, Apple TV or Fire TV box/stick with a simpler remote. The Stream box is completely optional and you never rent them, you buy them. If you buy new for $120, you can finance it at zero-interest at $5/mo for 24 months with the remaining balance due if you cancel service before 24 months. Their box runs a customized version of Google's Android TV and has access to thousands of apps from the Google app store and has Google Assistant built in through the voice remote. Generally speaking, folks seem to say that the DTV Stream service itself works best on that box but the user experience with other streaming services (e.g. Netflix, HBO Max, etc.) is better on a retail streaming device (e.g. Roku, etc.). So it's a bit of a trade-off. May come down to how much you use DTV Stream vs. streaming apps.
thanks for the info
i think i could save @ 50/month. i have a genie and an hr24
i wouldnt mind staying with directv, but the lack of new equipment tellme not to. i do not consider the hs17 an upgrade from what i have. more boxes, same number of tuners.
im going to try it with my firetv for a bit see how that works
 
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NashGuy

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Mar 24, 2009
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thanks for the info
i think i could save @ 50/month. i have a genie and an hr24
i wouldnt mind staying with directv, but the lack of new equipment tellme not to. i do not consider the hs17 an upgrade from what i have. more boxes, same number of tuners.
im going to try it with my firetv for a bit see how that works
I've read others saying that they put their DTV sat account on pause/hold and then signed up online for DTV Stream using a different email address than the one they have on file for their DTV sat account. That way, they can try out DTV Stream. If they like it, then they just call DTV back up and tell them to cancel the sat service. If they don't like it, they can cancel DTV Stream within 14 days and not pay anything, then call DTV back up and have them un-pause the sat service.

Oh, in case you have a free Rakuten cash back account, be aware that if you click through Rakuten first before going to the DirecTV website to sign up for Stream, you can get $37.50 cash back from Rakuten.
 

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