A note from Jeff Schumann from Manhattan Digital (1 Viewer)

harshness

SatelliteGuys Master
May 5, 2007
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Salem, OR
No 500 dollar upgrade fee...I have it
I clearly said "possible" as the fine print dictates.
Xfinity 2GB fine print said:
30-Day Money-Back Guarantee applies to one month’s recurring service and standard installation charges up to $500. ©2020 Comcast. All rights reserved.
If you already have Xfinity service, installation charges may or may not apply.
 

Jim S.

When someone asks you if you're a god, you say yes
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Comcast hasn't even bothered to upgrade all their systems to digital yet, let alone gigabit.
 
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raydio

K6KGW
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Jan 6, 2005
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That about sums it up right there. Why is the FCC beholden to broadcasters? Why aren't they required to do what is in the best interest of the citizens?

That being said, I thank you for the honest and well thought-out response and I respect and appreciate your work.

It's unfortunate CN that the FCC is a government agency, and I don't want to get political here, but it seems the FCC is for sale just like most other government agencies.
 

harshness

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May 5, 2007
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if you don't really know..don't comment
I do know what the terms and conditions say and they say that it may not be as wonderful as you suggest.

If you don't know that the lower 48 will be covered by whatever service you're going on about (be it 5G or Gig broadband), maybe you should add that to your bold statements.
 

Jim S.

When someone asks you if you're a god, you say yes
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Can you offer some examples where Comcast hasn't gone digital?

Turbotville, PA. They bought it from a local operator some years ago, but unlike other nearby systems they bought, they never upgraded it to digital. All they did was replace the local headend with a fiber feed from their regional headend.

I suspect they never upgraded because everyone who cares about decent video had already gone to satellite, but they're missing out IMHO on internet sales because the alternatives are Windstream and Verizon, both legendarily bad DSL operators.

When I mentioned it on the Comcast forum on BroadbandReports a while ago, someone said that there were two or three other small systems across the country that Comcast has never upgraded.
 

harshness

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May 5, 2007
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Salem, OR
When I mentioned it on the Comcast forum on BroadbandReports a while ago, someone said that there were two or three other small systems across the country that Comcast has never upgraded.
Two or three acquired coax systems is hardly indicative of what Comcast has been doing.
 

Jim S.

When someone asks you if you're a god, you say yes
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Two or three acquired coax systems is hardly indicative of what Comcast has been doing.

No, but it's not like they haven't had time to upgrade it, they didn't buy it just yesterday. I sometimes wonder why they bought it at all. Their website doesn't know about it, their national call center doesn't know about it, only the regional office knows about it, and some of them don't even know much -- I know one guy who was told that they couldn't hook him up because the line on his road was abandoned (it's not.)
 

harshness

SatelliteGuys Master
May 5, 2007
16,618
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Salem, OR
No, but it's not like they haven't had time to upgrade it, they didn't buy it just yesterday. I sometimes wonder why they bought it at all.
In a world of franchising, I suppose it is possible that they inherited the systems by default of the original operators. The jurisdiction needed someone to take over and they pressed Comcast hard to keep them running.
 

SScheidt

Member
May 28, 2013
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Modesto, CA
To the posters earlier, saying OTA is dying: As an antenna installer I can tell you that is not true. OTA was at a low point around 10 - 20 years ago, but thanks to the digital transition and streaming, antenna sales and installations are coming back big time for me now. In fact in my area (Central California) where there were about 15 stations before the digital transition, there are now triple that and they keep adding. The reason antennas are making a comeback is because of streaming. Cord cutters are realizing that with the network channels from the antenna, combined with movies and a la carte options streaming offers, they are well within 85% of the programming they were paying satellite and cable companies the big bucks for. Not only that, there are DVR's available for recording OTA as well as a wireless device that the antenna connects to via your wireless router (no coax needed throughout the home) that broadcast the OTA signal to any device in your home and beyond. The combination of OTA and streaming has become more advanced in the last 10 years and makers of hardware and apps are coming on board to accommodate the new generation of cord cutters. The comeback I'm experiencing in antenna installations is mostly from those around millennial age, and it shows no sign of slowing, in fact quite the opposite. So I disagree with those who say OTA is dying, not based on statistics I've read, but on real life experience, what I actually am seeing happen.
 

Juan

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They are slowly eliminating frequencies...not demand....is why it is dying
To the posters earlier, saying OTA is dying: As an antenna installer I can tell you that is not true. OTA was at a low point around 10 - 20 years ago, but thanks to the digital transition and streaming, antenna sales and installations are coming back big time for me now. In fact in my area (Central California) where there were about 15 stations before the digital transition, there are now triple that and they keep adding. The reason antennas are making a comeback is because of streaming. Cord cutters are realizing that with the network channels from the antenna, combined with movies and a la carte options streaming offers, they are well within 85% of the programming they were paying satellite and cable companies the big bucks for. Not only that, there are DVR's available for recording OTA as well as a wireless device that the antenna connects to via your wireless router (no coax needed throughout the home) that broadcast the OTA signal to any device in your home and beyond. The combination of OTA and streaming has become more advanced in the last 10 years and makers of hardware and apps are coming on board to accommodate the new generation of cord cutters. The comeback I'm experiencing in antenna installations is mostly from those around millennial age, and it shows no sign of slowing, in fact quite the opposite. So I disagree with those who say OTA is dying, not based on statistics I've read, but on real life experience, what I actually am seeing happen.

Sent from my SM-G950U using the SatelliteGuys app!
 

Radioguy41

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Aug 7, 2008
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They are slowly eliminating frequencies...not demand....is why it is dying

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Horsefeathers. That statement doesn't even make sense. Three years ago a scan would lock 56 channels for me. Two weeks ago a scan locked exactly 80. That ain't dyin' brother and that's after most of the locals have repacked.
 
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Juan

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Sep 14, 2003
26,232
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Moscow Russia
Have you heard the term " repack" ?
Horsefeathers. That statement doesn't even make sense. Three years ago a scan would lock 56 channels for me. Two weeks ago a scan locked exactly 80. That ain't dyin' brother and that's after most of the locals have repacked.

Sent from my SM-G950U using the SatelliteGuys app!
 

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