Blood treament that borders PED/HGH crossing all guidelines for all sports? (1 Viewer)

salsadancer7

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Read this very interesting article that has started to become a trend. Kobe went to Germany to do this as well as A-Rod.

Alex Rodriguez went to Germany for it, though he just as easily could have gone to Italy or Russia or Israel, where doctors too will draw your blood, spin it in a centrifuge with some sort of proprietary concoction to concentrate the growth factors that purport to prevent arthritis and then inject it back into an injured area. A-Rod got it in his balky right knee and left shoulder. He went on the advice of Kobe Bryant, who received treatment on his right knee.

And it’s imperative to note that everyone who matters in the anti-doping world, from the zealots who rail against the use of PED’s to the sports leagues that enforce the rules, consider Orthokine and its cousin, platelet-rich plasma therapy, a treatment and not a drug. How they make such a distinction I’m still not quite sure. And that’s where we are in this great big intersection of sports and science: at a line that blurs by the day, one in which treatment and performance enhancement become indistinguishable.

Take Orthokine. Kobe raved about it enough that A-Rod traveled to Dusseldorf to work with the doctor, Peter Wehling, who conceived the procedure to help treat the aging battle osteoarthritis. Athletes glommed onto it, and A-Rod and Kobe are only the latest to visit a man many consider a healing shaman.

The procedure, as Wehling outlines it, does nothing against sporting bodies’ drug laws. It takes a legal substance (a person’s blood), manipulates it (like doctors do during, say, surgery) and uses it to heal (as cortisone, for example, does inflammation). There is seemingly no ethical or moral quandary.



A-Rod's blood treatment care toes a fine line - MLB - Yahoo! Sports
 

Jimbo

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Hmmm, interesting ...

So, lets see, they take YOUR BLOOD out of you and spin it down and put it back into your system in the bad areas and your better because it was spun down ?

Are they adding anything else to it before putting it back into your body ?
If not, I don't see any reason for any issues as far as the Sports goes.

Otoh, if the doctor is adding something to it then shooting it back into you,that could be a problem.
 

salsadancer7

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Hmmm, interesting ...

So, lets see, they take YOUR BLOOD out of you and spin it down and put it back into your system in the bad areas and your better because it was spun down ?

Are they adding anything else to it before putting it back into your body ?
If not, I don't see any reason for any issues as far as the Sports goes.

Otoh, if the doctor is adding something to it then shooting it back into you,that could be a problem.

Until realizing that to attack the interleukin-1 protein that doctors believe facilitates arthritis, Wehling’s procedure involves stimulating growth factors – similar growth factors to IGF-1, which is on baseball’s banned list, and other drugs non grata.

Why, then, are Orthokine and PRP not outlawed by the World Anti-Doping Agency? Why was Bartolo Colon allowed to have his fat stem cells harvested and injected into his balky arm? What is the difference between either of those and HGH taken responsibly?

“I was in the car today thinking about it,” said Dr. Gary Wadler, a longtime member of the WADA committee that determines the banned list annually. “The distinction between enhancement and therapy – it’s not easy
.”


From the same article...
 

meStevo

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It's too bad that testing in general is so far behind where treatments like this are going. In the latest proposal from the players union, the NFLPA said that HGH testing should be voluntary, players should know ahead of time when they'll be tested and they should be able to decline to be tested ... wow.

I agree with Jimbo's line of thinking though, if they're not giving you more than what your body is already producing, then I dont have much of a problem with it. if they process your blood and dump a bunch of stuff into it... or even 'responsible HGH use' like what you have in bold... if your body didn't produce it I don't think it should be permissible.
 

Bodo Fenrirsson

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If it is a legitimate treatment for legitimate injuries or medical conditions......what's the problem? How about bone growth treatments for athletes who have broken bones that are not healing adequately? What about artificial joint replacement for active athletes(like Bo Jackson) who have degenerative joint desease? How about prosthetic limbs? Do athletes have to bring a doctor's note to prove that yes they do have an arthritic or other medical condition & the treatment is for those conditions? C'mon man.
 

Bodo Fenrirsson

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For professional athletes,their sport is their JOB. It is how they earn a living. If these treatments help them to be able to continue to WORK in their employment instead of having to retire because of a medical condition,what's the harm?
 

meStevo

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There's a difference between being able to keep doing your job, and cheating. I know that's a fine line in some cases, but in none of those you've mentioned so far is the line all that fine, as the difference between anything you just described and being healthy probably involves a handicap hanger on their rear view mirror.
 

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