Connect remote TV over Ethernet cable (1 Viewer)

cmc

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Aug 26, 2020
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I have a garage that's about 500 ft away from the main house. I have an ethernet cable already in place from the house to the garage. If I install a DirectTV dish/receiver at the main house, is there a way to get a TV in the garage connected via the ethernet cable? I would need to be able to control the garage TV tuner from the garage. Also, streaming over the internet is not option in this case. Internet is a metered Hughes Satellite service with limited bandwidth.

I've read little about DECA adapters and it seems this might be used somehow to make it work but I can't find anything definitive.

DIRECTV Broadband DECA Ethernet Over Coax Adapter

Thanks
 

HoTat2

SatelliteGuys Pro
Jun 12, 2012
1,271
323
Los Angeles, CA.
If you have a Genie installed in the house, you could "try" using a DIRECTV (wired) Mini client in the garage. And connect DECA adapters on each end of the ethernet cable and (preferably short) coax runs coming off a SWiM splitter in or on the house somewhere. And from the client box in the garage since the Mini clients do not have ethernet ports.

This wouldn't be an approved installation by DIRECTV of course, and there's no guarantee this will work well if at all. Since 500 ft. of ethernet cable is a long way. But you can give it a shot.

Plus if it works, then since you have a Mini client in the garage you don't have to worry about a separate way getting remote control signaling back to the house as the client box will handle that locally or over the ethernet connection when necessary.

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slice1900

SatelliteGuys Pro
Feb 14, 2015
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The max length for ethernet is 100 meters, it will not work at 500 ft. Well, it might "work" but I'd expect to see a lot of issues (the limit is due to timing so there really is a difference between 99 and 101 meters) which would increase the more traffic there is on the link. If it is already in use and working well enough for you, adding more traffic might be the straw that breaks the camel's back.

Is there any way to split that run into two segments? If you were able to cut it at the halfway point, you could get a couple 5 port PoE switches and connect one in the garage (where you'd need a switch anyway if you want to plug in more than just the DECA) and the other at that halfway point, remotely powered by the garage switch. Then you'd have two 250 ft segments which would be fine.

As far as connecting Directv, the only way you could use DECAs to connect across an ethernet segment (whether one out of spec 500 footer or two 250 footers) is if you had a client (C61 or whatever) in the garage and a Genie in the main house. DECA simply WILL NOT work with a regular receiver.

Perhaps the easiest solution would to be install a second dish at the garage. You could not use a client, it would have to be an H2x/HR2x receiver or DVR. You'd have to install the dish yourself (or have someone do it for you) since Directv won't support a setup with multiple dishes. But it works fine, and isn't against any rules (Directv just doesn't want to install another dish for you for free) and your monthly bill would be the same.
 

brcidd

Member
Aug 10, 2020
11
2
Troy, Oh
The max length for ethernet is 100 meters, it will not work at 500 ft. Well, it might "work" but I'd expect to see a lot of issues (the limit is due to timing so there really is a difference between 99 and 101 meters) which would increase the more traffic there is on the link. If it is already in use and working well enough for you, adding more traffic might be the straw that breaks the camel's back.

Is there any way to split that run into two segments? If you were able to cut it at the halfway point, you could get a couple 5 port PoE switches and connect one in the garage (where you'd need a switch anyway if you want to plug in more than just the DECA) and the other at that halfway point, remotely powered by the garage switch. Then you'd have two 250 ft segments which would be fine.

As far as connecting Directv, the only way you could use DECAs to connect across an ethernet segment (whether one out of spec 500 footer or two 250 footers) is if you had a client (C61 or whatever) in the garage and a Genie in the main house. DECA simply WILL NOT work with a regular receiver.

Perhaps the easiest solution would to be install a second dish at the garage. You could not use a client, it would have to be an H2x/HR2x receiver or DVR. You'd have to install the dish yourself (or have someone do it for you) since Directv won't support a setup with multiple dishes. But it works fine, and isn't against any rules (Directv just doesn't want to install another dish for you for free) and your monthly bill would be the same.
That's the way I do it, I have a separate dish and old SD receiver 400 ft from the main house- Bought it all from E-bay and installed it myself- called DTV to add the receiver to my account- they did not know I had a separate dish.
 

vazhog

SatelliteGuys Pro
Feb 22, 2014
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United States
That's the way I do it, I have a separate dish and old SD receiver 400 ft from the main house- Bought it all from E-bay and installed it myself- called DTV to add the receiver to my account- they did not know I had a separate dish.
Directv doesn't care how many dish's you have --LOL
 

Claude Greiner

SatelliteGuys Master
Supporting Founder
Sep 8, 2003
13,225
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Detroit - The Paris of the Midwest
You could get (2)Decca adaptors.

Instal 1 in the house, and convert the Directv signal to ethernet. Install the second in the garage and concert back to coax.

Only a genie mini would work in this scenario.

Ethernet cable is rated for 333 feet, but you should be able to push that to about 500 feet.

I have used that setup with ethernet cables and the decca adaptors. Had a customer who only had eithernet ran to a few rooms because they Pre wires everything for unversed.
 

HoTat2

SatelliteGuys Pro
Jun 12, 2012
1,271
323
Los Angeles, CA.
You could get (2)Decca adaptors.

Instal 1 in the house, and convert the Directv signal to ethernet. Install the second in the garage and concert back to coax.

Only a genie mini would work in this scenario.

Ethernet cable is rated for 333 feet, but you should be able to push that to about 500 feet.

I have used that setup with ethernet cables and the decca adaptors. Had a customer who only had eithernet ran to a few rooms because they Pre wires everything for unversed.
That's what I suggested the OP could give a try back in post #2 ...

But Slice shot it down in post #3 ...

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slice1900

SatelliteGuys Pro
Feb 14, 2015
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Yeah but it should work at 500 feet.

I have ethernet ran to a building I own across the street. Works fine at 500 feet, even running a wireless router on a POR switch

"Works" doesn't mean it is in spec. Switched ethernet has very tight timing specs, which are exceeded by any twisted pair connection longer than 100 meters. If you check the ports for errors and increase traffic levels you'll find more and more dropped frames.

This isn't like length limits for coax where Directv says "up to 150 feet is OK" but you can make twice that work since there's a lot of engineering slop in the specs which are attenuation based. There's no slop in ethernet specs, so exceed them at your own risk.
 

Claude Greiner

SatelliteGuys Master
Supporting Founder
Sep 8, 2003
13,225
3,761
Detroit - The Paris of the Midwest
"Works" doesn't mean it is in spec. Switched ethernet has very tight timing specs, which are exceeded by any twisted pair connection longer than 100 meters. If you check the ports for errors and increase traffic levels you'll find more and more dropped frames.

This isn't like length limits for coax where Directv says "up to 150 feet is OK" but you can make twice that work since there's a lot of engineering slop in the specs which are attenuation based. There's no slop in ethernet specs, so exceed them at your own risk.

As long as it works and the picture doesn’t freeze or breakup is all that matters.

If it was a regular internet connection I would be concerned, as download speeds vary along with packet loss.

But just for Tv, who cares.

Ideally you would want to run fiber in this situation, but if cat5 is the only thing there and it’s already ran, then it can’t hurt to try as there are really no other options unless you want to convert over to a wireless bridge
 

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