Epson Pro Cinema 4050 4K (pixel-shift) PRO-UHD Projector with HDR

Ilya

Ilya

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There is still no affordable true 4K projector from Epson. :(
Here is the latest pixel-shift offering though:

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The Epson Pro Cinema 4050 is the first projector with Epson's new 4K PRO-UHD technology. Epson 4K PRO-UHD features an advanced, high performance optical engine that generates high color brightness and white brightness, color accuracy, and dramatic contrast with HDR102. Paired with advanced lens capabilities, as well as the capability to receive, process and project native 4K using Epson's advanced pixel-shifting, resolution-enhancement technology, the Pro Cinema 4050 delivers an exceptional viewing experience.

Designed to deliver vivid imagery and crystal-clear pictures, the Pro Cinema 4050 touts an incredible 2,400 lumens of equal color and white brightness3, contrast ratio up to 200,000:1 and HDR102. Its expansive color gamut displays the entire DCI-P3 color space4 and Epson's advanced state-of-the-art 15-element glass projection lens displays a bright, uniform image with virtually no hot spots or chromatic aberration. In addition, a wide lens shift range offers exceptional installation flexibility, with the Pro Cinema 4050 delivering a ± 96 percent on the horizontal axis and ± 47 percent vertical axis. This premium projector also includes a 12-bit digital processing chip with Frame Interpolation and proprietary Advanced Motion Control for smooth, crisp transitions between scenes.

$2,399

Epson Launches Pro Cinema 4050 4K PRO-UHD Projector with HDR

Pro Cinema 4050 4K PRO-UHD Projector with Advanced 3-Chip Design and HDR | Pro Cinema | Projectors | For Home | Epson US
 
harshness

harshness

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Fortunately the other manufacturers (Sony, JVC, LG and even Optoma) are quite chatty about coming native UHD projectors.

The reviews seem to be fairly favorable for the $1,800 Optoma DLP so Epson may have their work cut out for them to improve on the HDR performance.

Now the only thing you have to reconcile is why they don't seem to offer advanced HDR modes in projectors.
 
Ilya

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My understanding is that advanced HDR, assumes a good understanding of the display characteristics, which is not very applicable to home projectors: unknown distance, unknown screen type, lighting conditions, etc. That’s why we don’t see Dolby Vision in any projectors. At least that’s the explanation I’ve seen thrown around.
 
harshness

harshness

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My understanding is that advanced HDR, assumes a good understanding of the display characteristics, which is not very applicable to home projectors: unknown distance, unknown screen type, lighting conditions, etc. That’s why we don’t see Dolby Vision in any projectors. At least that’s the explanation I’ve seen thrown around.
Do you buy into the idea that projectors cannot be calibrated?
 
Ilya

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For HDR?

You can’t calibrate brightens for projectors. And Dolby Vision algorithm, as I understand, needs to know the characteristics of the display device. You can get certain consistency between TV displays, but that’s not the case for projectors, which depend on room, screen size, it’s gain, etc.. Current algorithms are probably not flexible enough to account for all that. Perhaps Dolby can improve on that.

You have more control over those factors in cinemas. So Dolby Vision can be used there.
 
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tigerfan33

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Home projectors are useless up to this point as far as HDR is concerned. From my experience all HDR does is raise black levels and burn out lamp faster without improving the picture.
 
harshness

harshness

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If not, then what's the use of having a projector???
You can’t calibrate brightens for projectors. And Dolby Vision algorithm, as I understand, needs to know the characteristics of the display device. You can get certain consistency between TV displays, but that’s not the case for projectors, which depend on room, screen size, it’s gain, etc..
If you're having the projector calibrated in your home, do you not have sufficient control over the parameters? If not, maybe you aren't really a candidate for a projector.

LASERs are pretty bright and unless you're gene-spliced to DLP, there are certainly possibilities.

Absent HDR, the viewing experience is going to seem dull by comparison. HDR is the next step and if consumer projectors don't go there, they'll lose favor quickly (and the price will perhaps skyrocket).

As for the importance of DolbyVision, I think HLG will end up winning the day so this may be another case where being married to a particular technology isn't a good thing.
 

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