Fishing wires through walls.

Kraven

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Jun 2, 2012
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Northern, VT
Mounting a 55" LED on the wall and planning to run the wires/cables behind the wall.
Will this be a problem: the wall itself is stuffed w/ pink insulation.

Can I run a power cord (w/ extention), 4 HDMI and a USB extension along side pink insulation or would this be a
fire hazzard?

Cheers, K
 

John Kotches

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I would check your local electrical codes. The power might need to be in conduit.

The low voltage wiring (HDMI and USB) shouldn't require any special care other than being in-wall rated. I would suggest putting an HDMI switch in though so that you only have to put 1 HDMI cable in the wall. Also look for wall jacks that have HDMI connectors at a right angle to the jack in the wall so that you minimize cable bend inside the wall.

I'm thinking something like this:

31zBYkbdMHL._SX342_.jpg

Order from Amazon.
 

jimdandyvi

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Jun 19, 2010
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It can be done with some patience. The trick will be to keep your fish tape from snagging on the insulation

?For safety I would not pull an extension through the wall but instead pull some flexible plastic jacketed electrical cable up through the wall and install an outlet behind the TV.
 

teachsac

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If you are mounting the TV on the wall, I would hire an electrician to install an outlet. I would not run power cords through the wall. You're fine with speaker wire, HDMI Cables, Cat5 cables, etc. It's not that expensive.

S~
 

Kraven

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Jun 2, 2012
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Northern, VT
To clear up... its not exactly though the wall, more like behind it. Behind the wall itself (drywall/studs/insulation), I have a 2" gap before I hit the concrete wall of the garage. IE- concrete wall--> 2" space --> wall--> TV mounted on wall.

I do like the idea of adding an power outlet but am impatient and want this TV mounted asap.
 

jayn_j

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Sep 29, 2003
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No code in the world is going to allow an extension cord in the wall. You have a couple of choices.

First, as others have said, you can run a box up from the floor and add an outlet. This works best if you have an outlet directly under where you need to mount the TV. I guess I would also recommend using an electrician, especially if you aren't familiar with electrical wiring. I always feel confident to do this sort of thing myself.

Second option is to install something called a power bridge. It is basically a code legal extension cord with a female receptical on top and a male receptical in a box on the bottom. You plug an extension cord into the bottom and the TV into the top. These are made in a lot of configurations with and without accomodations for the low voltasge cables as well.
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias=aps&field-keywords=power bridge

The third option is to use paintable cable channel to bring the cord up the wall. I wouldn't recommend using the same channel for both power and low voltage cables though. It is uglier than the other solutions, but quick and dirty.
 

jevans64

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I'd definitely use conduit if you are going to run power up to an outlet extension that is backed by cinder blocks.

If your house is fairly new construction, then it is probably code-compliant. You can just " copy " the existing work and use the same materials, etc. -- use conduit if there is existing conduit or NM-B if there is NM-B. Personally, I like to run NM-B through conduit as it is easier to fish later on, especially on horizontal runs.

It shouldn't be a major problem to split off an existing receptacle, but you'll want to re-calculate circuit loads. Most state codes call for 80% of maximum load of all appliances attached to the circuit, so a 20 amp circuit should have no more than ~1900 watts total on it. Most appliances have the wattage listed on their ID plates and those that don't have wattage will have volts & amps. Volts x Amps = Watts.
 

Kraven

Resident Bozo
Jun 2, 2012
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Northern, VT
I'd definitely use conduit if you are going to run power up to an outlet extension that is backed by cinder blocks.

If your house is fairly new construction, then it is probably code-compliant. You can just " copy " the existing work and use the same materials, etc. -- use conduit if there is existing conduit or NM-B if there is NM-B. Personally, I like to run NM-B through conduit as it is easier to fish later on, especially on horizontal runs.

It shouldn't be a major problem to split off an existing receptacle, but you'll want to re-calculate circuit loads. Most state codes call for 80% of maximum load of all appliances attached to the circuit, so a 20 amp circuit should have no more than ~1900 watts total on it. Most appliances have the wattage listed on their ID plates and those that don't have wattage will have volts & amps. Volts x Amps = Watts.

Am a smart guy... and I have no clue what the h*** you're saying?!? :confused:
 

John Kotches

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Am a smart guy... and I have no clue what the h*** you're saying?!? :confused:

He is saying continous load on a circuit should only be 80% of rated capacity. So a 20 amp circuit shouldn't carry a continuous load greater than 16 amps.

Watts = Amps x Volts.

Watts = 16 amps x 120 volts

Continuous draw is 1920 watts.

Does that help?

Sent from my SCH-I605 using Tapatalk 4
 

navychop

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This is an easy job, but since you are asking, get help from a knowledgeable friend who might come over and help. Or hire an electrician who might not charge much for an after hours off the books job. It can be done quickly by someone familiar with the process.

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mike123abc

Too many cables
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Sep 25, 2003
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I would also consider where one lives. If you live somewhere where they are very picky with codes having and electrician do it may be the best bet.

Codes can also specify the number of outlets on a circuit.

Some place require a permit for anything.
 
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