Galaxy 17 on the move (1 Viewer)

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photoman76

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Jan 8, 2005
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Per Lyngsat Galaxy 17 is currently at 84 degrees West and moving West one degree per day. Where will it stop? At 91 degrees West and replace Galaxy 11 as originally planned or will it continue to 123 degrees West and replace Galaxy 10R until Galaxy 18 is launched? I'm guessing it will stop at 91 degrees West and replace Galaxy 11 as Galaxy 18 is on schedule for a May launch.
 

qwert1515

SatelliteGuys TheList
Sep 26, 2005
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We are going to have a fun time remembering where each satellite is at..... :D

I am going to say this now, I will never call a satellite at 123 West anything other than G10R :mad:
 

gabshere

SatelliteGuys Pro
Aug 20, 2006
3,720
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Rison , Arkansas
hmmm i'm starting this now...... i'm randomly changing the names , just to keep me guessing
that way i won't care if its gal 17 SBS 6 or H2 :D


hmm Gal 11 or Gal 17 , i'll change it now.... so it will keep moving onto G10r
 

Tron

SatelliteGuys Master
May 6, 2005
6,599
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Metro New Orleans, LA
It's almost useless trying to remember the names, between the satellites that move and the ones that simply change ownership. Then there are the ones that eventually will go to the great satellite graveyard in the sky :) If you ever come across literature from ten or more years ago, check out the satellites... not one familiar name, only familiar orbital slots :)
 

photoman76

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Jan 8, 2005
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Galaxy 17 still on the move or not?

Lyngsat shows Galaxy 17 to be stationary at 91 degrees West. But the latest TLE data on Celestrak.com shows Galaxy 17 at 100.6 degrees West and continuing to move West at 1.026 degrees per day.
 

GreatFTA

SatelliteGuys Pro
Aug 14, 2006
1,389
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Mississippi Delta
And maybe catch up with the Europeans with as much (or more) channels to watch! Funny we are considered the richest nation in the world but have a limited channels to watch, compared to Europe...
 

photoman76

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Jan 8, 2005
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Galaxy 17 has arrived and is now stationary at 123 degrees West. I wonder if we will be able to tell when the switch from Galaxy 10R to Galaxy 17 occurs?
 

truckracer

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Sep 17, 2004
4,339
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Charleston wv
Equity transponders are fairly strong. Here in WV they are both strong. Smaller dishes get the cross-pol interference from the 121W 11724V tp that dish network operates. that interference causes the 11720V tp that equity uses to appear "low" in signal quality.

A larger dish with a more narrow beamwidth will eliminate those problems.
It' s amazing that my 75cm dish locks that one at all.
Remember when aligning your dish on G10R ku that with this interference problem, your dish alignment is ever more critical.
 

photoman76

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Jan 8, 2005
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Dish is no longer using 11724 V on Echostar 9. Cross-pol interference should not be a problem at this time. It will be interesting to see what effect AMC 21 will have when it is launched later this year to 125 degrees West.
 

Woofle

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Nov 24, 2007
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Is G10R "sick"?

Galaxy 17 has arrived and is now stationary at 123 degrees West. I wonder if we will be able to tell when the switch from Galaxy 10R to Galaxy 17 occurs?

It seems odd to me to move G17 into G10R's slot to take over for it when G18 is scheduled for G10R replacement the same month.

Is G10R on life support or something, that it needed urgent decommissioning?

Or perhaps G17 will move to a nearby orbital slot once G18 is up and operational?

Or perhaps G18 has been re-targeted for another orbital slot?

Or might there be some utility in having two operational satellites in the same orbital slot, and G17 and G18 would work in tandem with non-overlapping transponders? (At least this makes some sense to me. ;)

Just wondering if there are any good educated guesses as to why they'd use precious fuel for such a short-term mission.
 

photoman76

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Jan 8, 2005
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Galaxy 10R is low on fuel. If there is a delay or a problem with the launch of Galaxy 18, Galaxy 10R could run out of station keeping fuel and a lot of customers would be without service. They could move Galaxy 12 over from 125 degrees West to cover the Cband customers, but it has no ku band capacity, so ku customers would lose service. I suppose they could keep Galaxy 17 at 123 degrees West permanently and send Galaxy 18 to 91 degrees West. But I haven't heard of any plans to do that.
 

Woofle

SatelliteGuys Family
Nov 24, 2007
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Galaxy 10R is low on fuel. If there is a delay or a problem with the launch of Galaxy 18, Galaxy 10R could run out of station keeping fuel and a lot of customers would be without service. They could move Galaxy 12 over from 125 degrees West to cover the Cband customers, but it has no ku band capacity, so ku customers would lose service. I suppose they could keep Galaxy 17 at 123 degrees West permanently and send Galaxy 18 to 91 degrees West. But I haven't heard of any plans to do that.

Oh. That makes a lot of sense. Thanks for the explanation!

They really are playing it safe then. Good deal. To paraphrase Barry Goldwater, Extremism in pursuit of uninterrupted RTN reception is no vice. ;)

I hope they find something useful for G17 to do after/assuming G18 deploys ok though.
 
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