Help with seized actuator arm (2 Viewers)

Status
Please reply by conversation.

kinetic711

Thread Starter
Member
Jan 26, 2010
11
0
North of the 49th
Has anyone taken apart an actuator arm? Long story short, I took the actuator arm (24" - Von Weise motor) off of my 10' Unimesh dish to see if it actually worked. This arm has been on the dish for I don't know how long and is a little seized. I have taken what I can apart and put power to the motor. The motor works but the arm is stuck. I want to take the arm right off of the motor housing so I can soak it overnight and see if I can get it to move (before I have to buy a new one). How do I get the arm off of the motor housing? :confused:
 

jsattv

SatelliteGuys Pro
Jul 4, 2006
1,061
8
Those step by step instructions by Gabshere are great. I used an old Battery Charger to cycle the unit after assembly to make sure it was working well. Remember to use grease when reassembling the Actuator, and the Actuator should be just like new.
 

Greg Mueller

Munich Oktoberfest
Mar 3, 2006
851
86
Datil, NM
I got one that was totally froze to work.
I separated the arm from the motor. The motor worked fine.
I took a crescent wrench and twisted the little square end of the screw rod until it turned. Then I dumped a bunch of oil in from the motor end. And hooked it up and cycled it in and out. A bunch of nasty rust colored oil came out.

I used it for several months and then replaced it because it was not counting right.
It still works.

I never throw anything away
 

cracklincrotch

SatelliteGuys Pro
Sep 28, 2007
1,026
0
Halifax, Nova Scotia
My Von Weiss was so frozen from rust there were no threads showing when I started.

Half a can of carburetor cleaner and a propane torch fixed up the biggest part of the freeze in about 20 minutes allowing me to use vise grips to at least start to move things. I then used a wire wheel on my drill on the threads to fix the rest in about an hour. Next I used CV joint grease to coat that thing so I couldn't see the threads again and put it all back together. Messy stuff. But I could turn the bushing on the threads with my pinky when I was done.
 

Pismire

SatelliteGuys Pro
Mar 6, 2008
865
38
Darrington, Wa.
I rebuilt a JGS today as the JGS I was using had some issues. On this one from te spares pile the armature was rusted from sitting for years. Tore the motor apart and cleaned it up, brushes are pretty much still full length. While I had it on the workbennch I tore it down completey and cleaned and greased everything. Working like new now. If I get time this summer I would like to rebuild a few from my junk pile to have as spares. Pretty simple devices really.
 

kinetic711

Thread Starter
Member
Jan 26, 2010
11
0
North of the 49th
Thank you to all who responded. I took my actuator apart last night according to the previous instructions. The inner tube was completely rusted inside the outer tube. With a lot of penetrating oil and some gentle persuasion against the garage floor, I was able to remove the outer tube. Once I had that off, I removed the threaded piece from the drive shaft, used a lot more oil on the threaded end and set it aside to soak overnight. I'll check it later to see if it will turn. :)
 

oldfoggie

SatelliteGuys Family
Jan 27, 2010
49
8
canada
froze actuator arm

before putting it together install a grease fitting about 2 inches up the tube, then grease it as needed, after assembling extend the arm 24 inches and the upper limit switch should cut out and stop movement, then retract the arm to be sure the down limit is triggered, if the upper limit stops the arm short of 24 inches manually screw the arm out to 24 inches, this should restore it to factory settings. if you don't keep it greased, it will wear out the plastic nut in the end of the tube that the worm gear travels through, there also is an "O" ring at the end of the tube but it is very hard to keep it in good condition, its purpose is to keep water from getting inside the tube. if anyone is interested I can tell you how to make the arm work good especially in winter weather,
 

kinetic711

Thread Starter
Member
Jan 26, 2010
11
0
North of the 49th
before putting it together install a grease fitting about 2 inches up the tube, then grease it as needed, after assembling extend the arm 24 inches and the upper limit switch should cut out and stop movement, then retract the arm to be sure the down limit is triggered, if the upper limit stops the arm short of 24 inches manually screw the arm out to 24 inches, this should restore it to factory settings. if you don't keep it greased, it will wear out the plastic nut in the end of the tube that the worm gear travels through, there also is an "O" ring at the end of the tube but it is very hard to keep it in good condition, its purpose is to keep water from getting inside the tube. if anyone is interested I can tell you how to make the arm work good especially in winter weather,
Very good info and yes, I would like to know how to keep the arm working well during the winter. Where I live, it is not unusual to have -30C overnight temps.
Further to my seized actuator arm. I got it to move and unscrewed it completely. I then cleaned the rust off of the threaded shaft with a wire brush and compressed air. I then used fine grit sand paper on the tube and sanded all of the rust off of it. I completely greased the threads with white lithium and screwed it back in and out again (that doesn't sound good). I repeated this step 3 more times until there was no longer any gritty sound. I greased the innertube and put the outer tube over it, and you guessed it, repeated this step 3 times, each time cleaning the dirty, rusty grease off of the tube, then re-greasing until it was completely silent. I put everything back together and will install my almost new actuator tomorrow, weather permitting. All in all, I used almost a 1 lb. tub of white lithium grease. Thanks for all of the advice from you satellite guys. :)
 

oldfoggie

SatelliteGuys Family
Jan 27, 2010
49
8
canada
froze actuator arm

we also get -30 up here , to make the actuator work easy I do this: get a plumber's heat tape, about a 5 or 6 foot will do, wind it around the tube up to the clamp and secure with electrical tape don't worry about the motor, pick up 2 lengths of pipe insulation, get the size that will fit over top of the tube, cut off excess, there is a heat sensor on the heat tape make sure that it is covered by the insulation, it doesn't take much energy to keep the insulated arm warm and the sensor will control it as well as cut out in the summer time, wrap the outside with a water proof material such as plastic, this will keep the arm warm and extend its life. I usually unplug mine once the temperature stays above freezing
 

kinetic711

Thread Starter
Member
Jan 26, 2010
11
0
North of the 49th
we also get -30 up here , to make the actuator work easy I do this: get a plumber's heat tape, about a 5 or 6 foot will do, wind it around the tube up to the clamp and secure with electrical tape don't worry about the motor, pick up 2 lengths of pipe insulation, get the size that will fit over top of the tube, cut off excess, there is a heat sensor on the heat tape make sure that it is covered by the insulation, it doesn't take much energy to keep the insulated arm warm and the sensor will control it as well as cut out in the summer time, wrap the outside with a water proof material such as plastic, this will keep the arm warm and extend its life. I usually unplug mine once the temperature stays above freezing
Thats a really good and simple fix to a cold weather problem. I am going to do it. Thanks Oldfoggie. :up
 

truckracer

SatelliteGuys Pro
Sep 17, 2004
4,339
351
Charleston wv
i have both my arms wrapped with heat tapes and then wrapped with a plastic bag. it keeps the dish moving quickly. one time my arm on the 10' froze and it tripped the circuit breaker on the back of my orb 7500 analog receiver.
 
Status
Please reply by conversation.

Users who are viewing this thread

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 0, Members: 0, Guests: 0)

Latest posts

Top