How much signal loss with grounding?

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bobvick

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I was wondering if anyone could tell me if I would notice a signal loss on my C-Band dish with installing a grounding block. I have a 8' grounding rod by the dish but I have not made up my mind if it is worth grounding it or not. Any suggestions?
 

SatelliteAV

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Not necessary to ground the coax at the dish, just be sure to ground to the structure ground prior to entering the building.

A quality connector and barrel in the coax line will likely introduce less than .5dB loss. If you ground the coax out at the dish, be sure to bond the ground rod to the structure ground so not to create a potentially lethal grounding potential.
 

bobvick

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The central grounding for my house is not easily accessible where the dish is located. That is why I drove a 8 foot grounding rod nearby the dish and I have a sold copper wire running from that to a dual grounding block. Should this serve the purpose?
 

Auric

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There was an extensive thread on this a few months back & I cant seem to find it. I'm like you though, my two BUD's are 200 & 250 feet away. I do not have them grounded at my house
 

sergei

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I was wondering if anyone could tell me if I would notice a signal loss on my C-Band dish with installing a grounding block. I have a 8' grounding rod by the dish but I have not made up my mind if it is worth grounding it or not. Any suggestions?

You'll never notice any lose with a grounding block, but I sure hope that you've tied the ground rod at the dish back to your main house ground. Otherwise your looking at having a ground loop and that can lead to a lot of problems.
 

bobvick

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sergei said:
You'll never notice any lose with a grounding block, but I sure hope that you've tied the ground rod at the dish back to your main house ground. Otherwise your looking at having a ground loop and that can lead to a lot of problems.

What kind of problems will you have if it is not hooked into the main? Would I be better off just leaving it alone as it is now?
 

sergei

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What kind of problems will you have if it is not hooked into the main? Would I be better off just leaving it alone as it is now?

All my dishes are all ground at the house by using grounding blocks, nothing at the dishes. One issue is noise or picture problems but [FONT=arial, helvetica]not all ground loops show up as picture disturbances. Erratic or strange behavior of other devices can be traced to grounding problems.[/FONT] The problems could be small but bigger problems during a lighting storm and you could have major failures.
Search Google for ground loops and lighting for more information or check previous postings.
 

SatelliteAV

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DO NOT ground out at the dish, UNLESS that ground is bonded to the structure ground.

A second ground can route electrical faults in paths that could damage equipment rather than protect. It also creates a possibility for a voltage potential if you have any wiring issues in the building.

To avoid a potentially deadly or damaging situation all grounds must be bonded together to form a common grounding grid.

Just because a member says "that's the way I did it" doesn't make it safe or conform to NEC (National Electrical Code) handbook. If you have any questions regarding proper grounding, consult with a local, licensed electrician.
 

bobvick

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I will probably see if I can find some copper wire at a reasonable price and run that from the dish to the central ground at my power meter. Sounds like that would be the best way to go.
 

mikekohl

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I would disagree with some previous statements. The mount of the dish SHOULD be attached directly to a nearby grounding rod. This will dissipate a direct lightning hit as fast as possible, between this large metal structure and into the earth in as short a distance as possible. Your grounding block is typically installed as close as possible to accomodate two things:
1) a reasonably direct length of coax cable between the entry point to the house and the indoor location of the satellite receiver, and 2) as close as possible to the ground potential of your house's main electrical ground at the service entrance. #2 is important, because it minimizes ground loop problems by having the receiver's ground potential as close as possible to your main house ground. Of course, it helps that your ground point on the AC outlet used by the satellite receiver is also directly connected to the service entry ground.

Do NOT ignore grounding in either situation, as the lack of ground potential can often fry an LNB due to static discharge from a lightning strike that could be a thousand feet away or more. Follow the NEC and other applicable codes.
 

SatelliteAV

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I just wanted to clarify that we had been specifically addressing the grounding of the coax at the dish with the addition of a ground block. The grounding of the dish to an unbonded ground could introduce the same issues if the coax shield was connected to a metal cased LNB(f) mechanically and electrically attached to the dish metal frame.

In any case, to meet NEC and to avoid issues, the additional grounds must be bonded.
 

Dishman Dan

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I was looking through a pdf file instruction manual on ole satellite receiver

but do not think that I could find it again but I will try.

I am not sure of its publication date or what version of the code it was or

even if the code was changed since then.

In the picture diagram they were showing to ground the dish too but

also connecting it to a common ground rod for the electrical service.
 

rta53

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Dishman Dan said:
I was looking through a pdf file instruction manual on ole satellite receiver

but do not think that I could find it again but I will try.

I am not sure of its publication date or what version of the code it was or

even if the code was changed since then.

In the picture diagram they were showing to ground the dish too but

also connecting it to a common ground rod for the electrical service.

This is basically correct. A satellite dish and a tv antenna are to be treated as separate structures. The NEC requires the bonding of these to a grounding electrode installed at the structure. This electrode is also required to be bonded to the common grounding electrode for your house.
 

rta53

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That's probably true. In fact installers will probably tell you the dish doesn't need a grounding electrode since it is grounded through the cable. However you want the shortest path possible to earth from a dish in order to provide the best protection.
 

Dishman Dan

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That's probably true. In fact installers will probably tell you the dish doesn't need a grounding electrode since it is grounded through the cable. However you want the shortest path possible to earth from a dish in order to provide the best protection.

The cable??? Are they talking that incredible tiny coax???
How many jigawatts can it handle??? :rolleyes:
 

bobvick

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I grounded at the central ground for my house, using 75' of copper wire. I also grounded to the grounding rod that is 8' in the ground by the dish. That should cover it.
 

sergei

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The cable??? Are they talking that incredible tiny coax???
How many jigawatts can it handle??? :rolleyes:

Your missing the point in grounding, simply your trying to reduce any charge that might be building up on the antenna whether it be a OTA or dish. antenna. Your trying to prevent damage that might come from voltage surge from a nearby lighting strike, not a direct hit, and all bets are off as most people are not going to pay for the equipment needed to stop it. You might want to read this article.

Grounding Satellite Dish and Lead-In Cables
 

turbosat

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Dec 26, 2006
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I'm not positive but it seems the code calls for #8 copper wire to connect to the ground rod. { house ground rod ] 91cents a foot last week-I checked because I've been buliding some scanner antennas from internet plans. If my satellite cable enters from the opposite end of the house from where the electrical service entry is located, would it be just the same to connect to a cold water pipe from the grounding block? Isn't the water pipe system usually grounded too?
I've never had a dish grounded at the dish itself, and never had a direct strike by lightning, but have had one receiver fried about 20yrs ago. Luckily , it and the lnb were the only things I lost. Now, all this talk has me wondering if I shouldn't get more grounded!
 

Dishman Dan

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Jun 22, 2008
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Your missing the point in grounding, simply your trying to reduce any charge that might be building up on the antenna whether it be a OTA or dish. antenna. Your trying to prevent damage that might come from voltage surge from a nearby lighting strike, not a direct hit, and all bets are off as most people are not going to pay for the equipment needed to stop it. You might want to read this article.

Grounding Satellite Dish and Lead-In Cables

Good info there!
I am thinking more on the lines of a near direct hit and how much juice that coax
can take and get it to earth on the shortest path. On my mind is a update we did
a few years ago and had to tie the grounds together between 2 200 amp panels.
We had to run 2 #6 bare conductors between the panels which are about 300'
from each other. Quite a roll of copper there! When I think of ground, what I just
mentioned comes to mind and not so much as taking care of electrical discharge. ;)
 
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