New C-Band Installation

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stecle

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Feb 17, 2010
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Between the North and South Pole
I am adding a another 10 foot dish to the farm so I thought I would take a few pictures of the installation. Hopefully this will be of some help to those installing a dish for the first time.
When I first started installing dishes many years ago, I simply dug a hole, stuck in the pipe and poured in some concrete like all the other dealers.

Then a customer in the sign business, showed me a much better way. I began using a base plate and threaded rod method. I feel this method has many advantages over pipe in concrete.

1) You get more concrete in the hole.
2) You can adjust the plumb at any time
3) There is no concern about keeping a pipe plumb while you pour the cement and wait for it to cure.
4) It is much easier to work with a 5 foot pipe that an 11 foot pipe.
5) The pipe can be easily removed.

I live in a very cold climate here in Canada where the frost can reach 6 feet in extreme winters. The threaded rod/rebar cage I built was 7 feet long from tip to tip. The hole was also approximately 7 feet and 12 inches square. I used 3/4 threaded rod and have never had a problem. I don't remember the rebar size, but it is not that critical anyway.

I always weld the rebar to the threaded rod with the rods firmly bolted to the plate. Simply put, build your threaded rod/rebar cage around your base plate. Not the other way around. You will notice that I weld 2 cross braces to the threaded rod, which will help keep the rods aligned to the holes in the base plate. It is very easy to bend the threaded rod/rebar cage in transportation and the pouring of the concrete. I skipped this step on my first one and paid for it by having a plate that wouldn't fit on the rods that were already cemented in.

NEXT UP: Pouring the concrete.
 

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cyberham

cyberham

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Jun 16, 2010
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Where I plan to move, it would be impossible to dig a 7-foot hole. How about a technique for attaching such a plate to solid granite bedrock?
 
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AZ.

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Where I plan to move, it would be impossible to dig a 7-foot hole. How about a technique for attaching such a plate to solid granite bedrock?
That is easy, get to the rock, use a hammer drill, drill into the rock and make sure its a snug fit for the rebar into the rock( hammer it in or tap it in the drilled hole).....The bolts dont need to be welded just a few feet long and a 90 or a hook a few inches long on the end that goes into the concrete...Same way you would install a light pole!3/4 x 30 x 3 Inch Galvanized Steel Anchor Bolt Set For Anchor Base Light Poles
 
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FTA4PA

FTA4PA

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Nov 13, 2013
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Where I plan to move, it would be impossible to dig a 7-foot hole. How about a technique for attaching such a plate to solid granite bedrock?
Here's another option which may work. YMMV. :)


These are made for concrete but might work for granite as well. They are also available in 5/8" and 3/4" but the 1/2" is all Lowes had in stock at the time. Back in 2014 I used the 1/2" x 5 1/2" anchors to install my 8ft mesh dish onto an old concrete slab where a shed used to be and it is still solid to this day.

Mount Example


The mount for that dish had a small metal plate attached to the pole with three support rods. Because of the way it was designed I leveled it with washers at the time. Having learned a bit since then I would try to use the following setup now. Drill holes in base (concrete, granite, etc), tap in anchors, fasten a steel plate with threaded mounting rods (for the dish mount plate), install dish mounting plate, level and tighten it down.

Adjustable Dish Mount
 
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johnnynobody

johnnynobody

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Aug 2, 2009
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I used fiberglass infused concrete with my KTI in addition to threaded L-rods (custom made), and a 5 foot deep hole. Been working great for over 10 years.
 
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Radioguy41

Radioguy41

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Aug 7, 2008
2,390
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Lehighton, PA
I am adding a another 10 foot dish to the farm so I thought I would take a few pictures of the installation. Hopefully this will be of some help to those installing a dish for the first time.
When I first started installing dishes many years ago, I simply dug a hole, stuck in the pipe and poured in some concrete like all the other dealers.

Then a customer in the sign business, showed me a much better way. I began using a base plate and threaded rod method. I feel this method has many advantages over pipe in concrete.

1) You get more concrete in the hole.
2) You can adjust the plumb at any time
3) There is no concern about keeping a pipe plumb while you pour the cement and wait for it to cure.
4) It is much easier to work with a 5 foot pipe that an 11 foot pipe.
5) The pipe can be easily removed.

I live in a very cold climate here in Canada where the frost can reach 6 feet in extreme winters. The threaded rod/rebar cage I built was 7 feet long from tip to tip. The hole was also approximately 7 feet and 12 inches square. I used 3/4 threaded rod and have never had a problem. I don't remember the rebar size, but it is not that critical anyway.

I always weld the rebar to the threaded rod with the rods firmly bolted to the plate. Simply put, build your threaded rod/rebar cage around your base plate. Not the other way around. You will notice that I weld 2 cross braces to the threaded rod, which will help keep the rods aligned to the holes in the base plate. It is very easy to bend the threaded rod/rebar cage in transportation and the pouring of the concrete. I skipped this step on my first one and paid for it by having a plate that wouldn't fit on the rods that were already cemented in.

NEXT UP: Pouring the concrete.
If I may make a suggestion, 3 rather than 4 bolts will make it much easier to adjust if necessary.

90cm dish 16L
 
Comptech

Comptech

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Jun 26, 2006
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Hehe, solid granite here, so I dug as far as I could witch was about two feet, then got the hammer drill out and a pick axe made it to four foot and dish has been fine for 3 plus years now.
 
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Comptech

Comptech

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Jun 26, 2006
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Travelers Rest SC
Between the granite and the hard clay the 10 footer is going no where. I also drilled a hole through the mount and pole and put a quarter inch aluminum rivet in it. The mount bolts are just snug, not hammered down, so the dish will spin if needed. But last years tropical storm with 90 MPH gusts never moved it. Also my pole is cut at a 45 degree and at the bottom, the drilled through with a 3/8's x 5 inch bolt inserted were the concrete was poured into the hole.
 
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stecle

Thread Starter
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Feb 17, 2010
258
98
Between the North and South Pole
If I may make a suggestion, 3 rather than 4 bolts will make it much easier to adjust if necessary.

View attachment 154850
I have observed that most big signs and street lights use a base of 4 rods or more. I guess I would have a concern of the pipe being less stable using 3 rods instead of 4. I have never had difficulty getting a pipe plumb with 4 rods.
 
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stecle

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Pro
Feb 17, 2010
258
98
Between the North and South Pole
Pouring the concrete

I built a form using some scrap 2 X 4's to make a nice clean job. If you want to spend the money a sonotube is the easiest way to go. I am attaching this pipe to a structure so I didn't install any conduit.

I like to have the concrete pile above the grade to keep water from pooling on top and it makes it easier to adjust the nuts. I covered the nuts and threads with some masking tape to keep them clean while pouring the concrete.

I have a quarry nearby so I picked up a 1/2 yard of cement gravel. I used about 1 and a half bags of Portland cement for the job. You can also use the "just add water" concrete mix, however it will cost you 2 to 3 times more. I would strongly recommend using a cement mixer. It will make your job much easier and do a better job mixing the concrete.

NEXT UP: Preparing the pipe
 

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Melvinfta

Melvinfta

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Jun 21, 2019
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Miami
Pouring the concrete

I built a form using some scrap 2 X 4's to make a nice clean job. If you want to spend the money a sonotube is the easiest way to go. I am attaching this pipe to a structure so I didn't install any conduit.

I like to have the concrete pile above the grade to keep water from pooling on top and it makes it easier to adjust the nuts. I covered the nuts and threads with some masking tape to keep them clean while pouring the concrete.

I have a quarry nearby so I picked up a 1/2 yard of cement gravel. I used about 1 and a half bags of Portland cement for the job. You can also use the "just add water" concrete mix, however it will cost you 2 to 3 times more. I would strongly recommend using a cement mixer. It will make your job much easier and do a better job mixing the concrete.

NEXT UP: Preparing the pipe
Pretty clean job thanks for sharing!!!!
 
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