New C-band satellites coming (1 Viewer)

wvman

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Signals intended for the Lower 48 United States will only be permitted to use 4000-4200 MHz. Signals not intended for the Lower 48 can still use 3700-4000 MHz, assuming the regions and countries those signals are targeted toward don't go through with C-band reallocations of their own.

You will not be able to pick up signals in the 3700-4000 MHz range if or when cell phone companies in your local area start transmitting on those frequencies. To continue receiving C-band signals in the 4000-4200 MHz range, you will likely also need a new LNB that filters out interference from the new cell phone signals below 4000 MHz.

Are they going to use the 4000-4200 MHz frequencies on all satellites, or certain satellites? I hope they won't tie up this frequency on all satellites because the christian network we watch is on 4004mhz on Galaxy 16. Will the Titanium LNBF with the filters take care of the interference?
 

kofi123

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Apr 13, 2014
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Are they going to use the 4000-4200 MHz frequencies on all satellites, or certain satellites?

4000-4200 MHz is what will be left for C-band satellite signals specifically targeting the 48 contiguous United States.

I hope they won't tie up this frequency on all satellites because the christian network we watch is on 4004mhz on Galaxy 16.

If you're talking about Shepherd's Chapel, the transition plans show that signal moving to Galaxy 16 TP 15 beginning on or around December 6, 2021. That's where the LESEA mux is located now. The LESEA mux is scheduled to move to Galaxy 16 TP 17 beginning on or around October 1, 2020.
 
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Brct203

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Dec 24, 2016
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4000-4200 MHz is what will be left for C-band satellite signals specifically targeting the 48 contiguous United States.
that's where my worry is... Services aimed at the US will comply and relocate to the reduced C-Band, but we might lose many other services, for example aimed at Latin America (or Canada?) that won't relocate and will get interference from 5G
 

johnnynobody

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Are they going to use the 4000-4200 MHz frequencies on all satellites, or certain satellites? I hope they won't tie up this frequency on all satellites because the christian network we watch is on 4004mhz on Galaxy 16. Will the Titanium LNBF with the filters take care of the interference?

I don't think Titanium LNBF's have such filtering, yet. At least one of his LNBF's is filtered for 3700-4200. I suppose he'll be making LNBF's that filter out anything below 4000? But that would be bad if it's true that Canadian and Mexican sats will still use 3700-4200. I wonder how bad the 5G interference will be.......
 

Titanium

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The preproduction sample LNBFs have been tested and will produce them when the interference exists in the real world. :biggrin

We will be able to filter at 4.00GHz and provide attenuation of -40dB within the 20MHz band guard.

Johnnynobody is correct, Out current filtering is below 3.70GHz and effective against the current 3.65GHz channel interference. Will continue to manufacture and sell 3.4 - 4.2GHz and 3.7-4.2GHz models for systems with different frequency range requirements.

I imagine that some hobbyists will move their dishes behind RF barriers to attenuate local terrestrial interference and still be able to receive satellite services in the affected range.
 

mr3p

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I imagine that some hobbyists will move their dishes behind RF barriers to attenuate local terrestrial interference and still be able to receive satellite services in the affected range.

In the process of doing this right now :)
 

johnnynobody

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I imagine that some hobbyists will move their dishes behind RF barriers to attenuate local terrestrial interference and still be able to receive satellite services in the affected range.

I'll wait and see if this will be a real problem. If it is a problem and if the cost of mitigation hits my tipping point I'll have to say goodbye to this "hobby".
 

907TECH

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I do not expect to see a big problem but the jury is still out. Not like the in band terrestrial microwave radio problems of the 1980's.
 
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