No sat allowed... (1 Viewer)

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tripod

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Guru
Jan 27, 2005
148
0
what is the Fcc reg # that regulates where you can and where you cant have a Dish? Thanx.
 
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charper1

Bourbon Tester
Supporting Founder
May 18, 2004
18,442
6
I'm Nationwide
what is the Fcc reg # that regulates where you can and where you cant have a Dish? Thanx.

OTARD: FCC Fact Sheet on Placement of Antennas (an YES, a dish is an antenna too)
CLICK THIS LINK ABOVE

...AND you must be within specif guidelines to have a dish on property you do not own. You can't blindly just have one and they can't blindly say no either; each of you must abide by specific rules.
 
Last edited:

tripod

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Guru
Jan 27, 2005
148
0
What is the problem specifically?

I live in a Senior housing conglomerate run by the county.Four apts to a unit,on the ground.I had a Sat since '96 till I moved here 18 mos ago.Must use cable,told" If we let you put up a sat then 40 others will want to have it,also.So cant permit the dish.Cable is a rinky-dink outfit with limited HD-Blue Ridge cable Co.I believe my rights are being violated as to erecting a Sat dish on a tripod on my patio,which gives me a straight shot to the SW.The FCC is supposed to have something in writing stating this.
 
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Hall

SatelliteGuys Master
Feb 14, 2004
18,409
3,194
Germantown OH
A dish mounted on a tripod on your patio will be allowed and the FCC will side with you if you push the issue. Why does the management care if people do the same ? If they think people will be getting dishes installed on the roof, they're wrong. That's most likely NOT allowed and the FCC won't help them there.

One thing they could get you on is, how do you get the cabling from the dish inside to your unit ? If they say "no holes drilled", they are completely within their rights.
 

tripod

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Guru
Jan 27, 2005
148
0
Read lease and no reference to"no holes drilled'. Thanx also to charper,I made copy of Info sheet and will procede to submit my sat installation request and $75 fee.:)
 

rabidfool

Member
Aug 2, 2008
11
0
I would ask for the policy in writing and *if* they have one request which parts of it are law and which are their own self implemented policy.

While the person you spoke with may believe it is in effect for cosmetic reasons, it may be for liability. I know here in Mass a lot of state assisted and state run programs limit what you can and can't have for insurance reasons.
 

Andrewwski

SatelliteGuys Pro
Aug 24, 2007
1,205
4
If apartments really don't want dishes everywhere, like many look, they should put appropriate dishes on the roof for each service and drop a line for whichever apartment wants that service. That's my thinking anyway.
 

charper1

Bourbon Tester
Supporting Founder
May 18, 2004
18,442
6
I'm Nationwide
You are SO right!


God I have said that 1000000000000000 time over; I really do think apartments must be taking some sort or bribes or kickbacks by NOT offering a building-wide dish (in addition to the cable outlet) so that each user can decide what THEY want in their home. Heck I have seen many new complexes that have setup their OWN personal "cable co" and don't even offer the normal metro-wide cable.
 

hyperguy

SatelliteGuys Pro
Jul 23, 2008
299
0
Upstate NY near Corning
I went to a apt. complex the other day for a install since they only offer dish but they would not let me install it because some company they have a contract with is only allowed to install it and that company is ripping off these old people they do not allow them to get the receivers from dish they have to lease them from them and they charge a $300 deposit for a 625 telling them they cost $475 each
 

whiplash123

SatelliteGuys Family
May 18, 2008
39
0
Sudbury, ON
I own an apartment building and wish I would get free tv... everyone is allowed to put a dish on our roof or balconys as long as it's non penetrating roof mount or a skid. A few years ago we just about threw a Be** installer off the roof for not getting my permission, didn't sign the saftey waiver, was scratching the roof with the ladder and trying to drill into the roof! They've since change the policy about getting landlord permissions before starting work.
 

Tyralak

SatelliteGuys Master
Oct 21, 2003
5,702
167
Secure, Undisclosed Location
A dish mounted on a tripod on your patio will be allowed and the FCC will side with you if you push the issue. Why does the management care if people do the same ? If they think people will be getting dishes installed on the roof, they're wrong. That's most likely NOT allowed and the FCC won't help them there.

One thing they could get you on is, how do you get the cabling from the dish inside to your unit ? If they say "no holes drilled", they are completely within their rights.

That's why God created flat cable. :D
 

Tyralak

SatelliteGuys Master
Oct 21, 2003
5,702
167
Secure, Undisclosed Location
I own an apartment building and wish I would get free tv... everyone is allowed to put a dish on our roof or balconys as long as it's non penetrating roof mount or a skid. A few years ago we just about threw a Be** installer off the roof for not getting my permission, didn't sign the saftey waiver, was scratching the roof with the ladder and trying to drill into the roof! They've since change the policy about getting landlord permissions before starting work.

I'm curious. What kind of laws regarding satellite placement do they have where you are? Here they have the FCC rules which state you cannot be outright prevented from having a dish, but depending on the circumstance, reasonable restrictions may apply. Do they have anything similar up there in America's hat?
 

Anole

SatelliteGuys Master
Sep 22, 2005
11,819
10
L.A., Calif.
who pays for this?

If apartments really don't want dishes everywhere, like many look, they should put appropriate dishes on the roof for each service and drop a line for whichever apartment wants that service.
On the surface, this sounds like a great idea for the renters.
Installers would love it!
The renter calls up Dish, who brings out a receiver and plugs it into the wall, and they're done!

I sat down with a buddy who owns several small apartment buildings recently, for a brainstorming session on just how to do this.
Many of the residents would want International, and of course you'd also need Hi Def.
So, for Dish Network, that's four satellite dishes.
Then there is liability for signal outages... who does the customer call?
Turned out, it would cost quite a bit of money for hardware, not to mention the expense running all the cables.
Support for the dual-tuner receivers complicated the matter, even more.

And this was just for Dish Network.
We never even considered DirecTV.
So, the idea was dropped.
 

Tyralak

SatelliteGuys Master
Oct 21, 2003
5,702
167
Secure, Undisclosed Location
On the surface, this sounds like a great idea for the renters.
Installers would love it!
The renter calls up Dish, who brings out a receiver and plugs it into the wall, and they're done!

I sat down with a buddy who owns several small apartment buildings recently, for a brainstorming session on just how to do this.
Many of the residents would want International, and of course you'd also need Hi Def.
So, for Dish Network, that's four satellite dishes.
Then there is liability for signal outages... who does the customer call?
Turned out, it would cost quite a bit of money for hardware, not to mention the expense running all the cables.
Support for the dual-tuner receivers complicated the matter, even more.

And this was just for Dish Network.
We never even considered DirecTV.
So, the idea was dropped.

If you do it yourself, yes. Dish Network has a commercial department. I've worked on commercial systems. There are two types. The more expensive, but less hassle for the customer QAM systems, which are essentially a small cable headend, and you use either a QAM receiver (351, 381) or a Qbox with a normal receiver to receive programming. Everything is mapped down to cable frequencies and goes through regular cable splitters. There's also the regular L-Band system which is great for small buildings. You have a 26" or 30" dish for each satellite location going into a bank of switches, with direct lines going to each room of each apartment. As expensive as that sounds, it's less than a QAM system. There's also a SMATV system. Those can be used in combination with a QAM or L-Band system to provide a selection of free channels and locals over analog frequencies (just like cable). But setting one up as your sole TV system is pretty gay. The tenant would only have whatever channels you manually install on the system, and it makes using a DVR difficult, because the listings won't match. Long story short: A building with a handful of apartments is best served with an L-Band system. A building with a crapload of apartments is best served with a QAM system. There usually isn't a lot of trouble with these systems, especially the L-Band ones. And if there is, generaly DNS takes care of it, as each customer has their own account. If you want to give it a second thought, you might want to contact Dish Network Commercial Services and ask a few questions.
 

jayn_j

Press On Regardless
Supporting Founder
Sep 29, 2003
10,687
3,291
Sheboygan, WI
I went to a apt. complex the other day for a install since they only offer dish but they would not let me install it because some company they have a contract with is only allowed to install it and that company is ripping off these old people they do not allow them to get the receivers from dish they have to lease them from them and they charge a $300 deposit for a 625 telling them they cost $475 each

I find this response interesting, as well as the previous one where the OP was going to pay a $75 fee and ask permission, while showing them the FCC memo.

Folks, they canno prevent you from erecting a DISH in your own controlled area, such as a patio. The HOA cannot prevent you from erecting a DISH on your property. They cannot charge a fee or ask for an approval period. See fhe following taken from the OTARD document (bold is mine):

OTARD said:
Q: What types of restrictions are prohibited?

A: The rule prohibits restrictions that impair a person's ability to install, maintain, or use an antenna covered by the rule. The rule applies to state or local laws or regulations, including zoning, land-use or building regulations, private covenants, homeowners' association rules, condominium or cooperative association restrictions, lease restrictions, or similar restrictions on property within the exclusive use or control of the antenna user where the user has an ownership or leasehold interest in the property. A restriction impairs if it: (1) unreasonably delays or prevents use of; (2) unreasonably increases the cost of; or (3) precludes a person from receiving or transmitting an acceptable quality signal from an antenna covered under the rule. The rule does not prohibit legitimate safety restrictions or restrictions designed to preserve designated or eligible historic or prehistoric properties, provided the restriction is no more burdensome than necessary to accomplish the safety or preservation purpose.

Q: What types of restrictions unreasonably delay or prevent viewers from using an antenna? Can an antenna user be required to obtain prior approval before installing his antenna?

A: A local restriction that prohibits all antennas would prevent viewers from receiving signals, and is prohibited by the Commission's rule. Procedural requirements can also unreasonably delay installation, maintenance or use of an antenna covered by this rule. For example, local regulations that require a person to obtain a permit or approval prior to installation create unreasonable delay and are generally prohibited. Permits or prior approval necessary to serve a legitimate safety or historic preservation purpose may be permissible. Although a simple notification process might be permissible, such a process cannot be used as a prior approval requirement and may not delay or increase the cost of installation. The burden is on the association to show that a notification process does not violate our rule.

Q: What is an unreasonable expense?

A: Any requirement to pay a fee to the local authority for a permit to be allowed to install an antenna would be unreasonable because such permits are generally prohibited. It may also be unreasonable for a local government, community association or landlord to require a viewer to incur additional costs associated with installation. Things to consider in determining the reasonableness of any costs imposed include: (1) the cost of the equipment and services, and (2) whether there are similar requirements for comparable objects, such as air conditioning units or trash receptacles. For example, restrictions cannot require that expensive landscaping screen relatively unobtrusive DBS antennas. A requirement to paint an antenna so that it blends into the background against which it is mounted would likely be acceptable, provided it will not interfere with reception or impose unreasonable costs.
 

whiplash123

SatelliteGuys Family
May 18, 2008
39
0
Sudbury, ON
I'm curious. What kind of laws regarding satellite placement do they have where you are? Here they have the FCC rules which state you cannot be outright prevented from having a dish, but depending on the circumstance, reasonable restrictions may apply. Do they have anything similar up there in America's hat?

In Canada we have the CRTC they will be sending this information in a few days and I'll post it here.

Below is a link to Bell's permission request form for landlords.
http://www.bell.ca/web/tv/en/all_regions/pdfs/letterofpermission.pdf
 

whiplash123

SatelliteGuys Family
May 18, 2008
39
0
Sudbury, ON
Tyralak, here is the information you requested:

The Commission’s (CRTC) policy with respect to television distribution is to foster consumer choice among competing distributors of programming services.
With regard to multiple-unit dwellings, the Commission’s regulations generally prohibit a distributor from entering into an exclusive agreement with a building owner for the distribution of programming services to the building. Specifically, under the Commission’s regulations, a distributor may enter into such an exclusive arrangement with a building owner only when it is not technically feasible for more than one distributor to provide service to the building. Even then, the Commission has identified certain circumstances in which exclusive arrangements would be considered an "undue preference" and would, therefore, be prohibited under section 9 of the Broadcasting Distribution Regulations.
A distributor may complain to the Commission when it has reason to believe that a competing distributor has entered into an exclusive arrangement with a building owner. The Commission assesses such complaints against distributors on a case-by-case basis.
That being said, note that we do not intervene directly in contractual matters between a landlord and a tenant (for example, a landlord may decide that it does not want satellite dishes on his property). Further, the Commission is generally not in a position to compel an unwilling building owner to permit a competing distributor to provide service to a building.
 
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