Now I see why people use multiple dishes.

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TRG

TRG

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Now I see why people use multiple dishes.

And not just for fast channel changes. Today I spent a couple hours of quality time up on the roof with my TV, receiver and a couple of wrenches attempting some minor tweaks. What I found was that I could get a good Azimuth adjustment across the arc but I never was able to nail the Elevation for some reason. My true south satellite 107.3W Anik F1R doesn't give me a good baseline. By that I mean when adjusting the angle of the dish bracket either the signal stays about the same and is there or not in about a 5 degree range of motion up and down. When I go to my favorite sats 87W AMC 3 and 123W Galaxy 10R I can tweak one end or the other but not both for full quality on the meter. Basically in the end I wound up "splitting the difference." The pole is plumb so I'm starting to think that the angle of the motor might be off a little bit. The picture is very watchable but being a perfectionist I'm not satisfied yet. Any ideas?

My Latitude is 35.1 (Abq. NM) and I set my motor angle to that. And my system consists of a Viewsat VS PRO, SG2100 from DMS international and a 90 cm Azure Shine (3ABN special).
 
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qwert1515

qwert1515

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Take a look at this image from Geo-Orbit

With a correctly aligned dish you should be able to get the best possible signal on the whole arc.
 

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turbosat

turbosat

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Dec 26, 2006
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Usually when the ends of the arc differ much from the middle, you have declination off somewhat. You may be able to get it closer, but for me, I find I 'split the difference' sometimes too.
There's a point where you have to say good is good enough.
 
stogie5150

stogie5150

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Are you absolutely sure that your mast/pole is staying plumb? What you describe is classic pole flex when the motor moves to one end or the other of the arc. It absolutely does not take much to throw you off so bad it will make you pull your hair out.

Which is also why we reccommend a ground mount if at all possible, and the biggest pipe that your motor will accomomodate, I use 3 inch for mine, but I use 1m P* dishes and they are heavy. You will never go wrong with too heavy a pole or too much concrete. :up

Once I had a stable, level pole, aiming a motorized dish took me no more than a half hour, from a pile of parts to watching tv. :up
 
digiblur

digiblur

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People don't use multiple dishes because of signal. Usually folks put a dish at G10R since they watch it a lot or on the AMC1 bird because of the funny skew.

Keep at it... it isn't always necessary to use your true south bird to lineup the dish. I just pick one somewhere near the middle and then the bottom of both sides of the arc.
 
TRG

TRG

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Are you absolutely sure that your mast/pole is staying plumb? What you describe is classic pole flex when the motor moves to one end or the other of the arc. It absolutely does not take much to throw you off so bad it will make you pull your hair out.

I checked plumb when I was up there today. But I checked when it was standing still. I'll check for flex next time I'm up on the roof. I'm thinking it might be a declination issue like qwert1515 suggests. I made a couple of real small adjustments and it seemed to help a little. It was getting dark and cold so I called it a wrap for the day.

BTW - I wanted to put the dish on a pole in the backyard but no matter where I went there was a tree in the way. The front lawn was off limits, orders from "the boss". So up on the roof it went. The pole is one of the standard types with stabilizer outrigger supports all solidly lagged to rafters and or the ridge beam. It's pretty solid and to the best of my knowledge plumb. Of course we have had some nasty winds since I put it up this summer. I'll give it all a good looking over once more when I get a chance.
 
jayelem

jayelem

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Jan 5, 2006
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COLD !!!!!

Is that even possible living in the Land of Enchantment.

I'm thinking that Mojitos and FTA don't mix :D

My mistake ...............:eek:

Land of Enchantment and Island of Enchantment are completely different.

Had to read your earliest post to figure out you were in New Mexico.

I agree that nights are cold in the southwest.
 
voomvoom

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My first thoughts is ...., and since you didn't mention your longitude?, that you are pointed at your true south satellite, when you should be pointed to your true south. Example, you say 107.3 is your true south satellite, but if you are at 107.0 or maybe 107.7 (or something other than 107.3), and you pointed your dish at 107.3 and not to your true south, then you are bound to miss the arc somewhere? Just a thought?

Al
 
updatelee

updatelee

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as long as you pic a satellite close to your true south you'll be ok. the closer the sat is to your true south the easier it will be to aim, technically you could pic any satellite in the sky to aim at but it'll be harder as you go farther from your true south.
 
qwert1515

qwert1515

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as long as you pic a satellite close to your true south you'll be ok. the closer the sat is to your true south the easier it will be to aim, technically you could pic any satellite in the sky to aim at but it'll be harder as you go farther from your true south.

I agree with Updatelee, before Dish Network was kind enough to launch "Anik F3 at 118.8°W" now my true South satellite, I used to use Galaxy 11 at 91.0°W because it was my arc's common (I use satellites between 58°W and 123°W most of the time) center satellite.
 
voomvoom

voomvoom

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My opinion is, the motor should be pointed true south, regardless of where the closest satellite to it is at. The settings in the receiver should be set to your location (latitude and longitude) and while the motor is on 0 and pointed to your true south (the south pole). Then using the receiver drive the dish with motor to your true south satellite and adjust as needed.
Do not adjust as needed on your true south satellite before you drive to it with the receiver. If you are at 107.3, then this is all moot, but if you are somewhere else other than 107.3, then you need to do the above? My thoughts!

Al
 
M

Mr Tony

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People don't use multiple dishes because of signal. Usually folks put a dish at G10R since they watch it a lot or on the AMC1 bird because of the funny skew.

exactly. The other reason is usually line of site issues where they cant see the whole arc at a location so they put up a fixed dish at somewhere else on property
 
N5XZS

N5XZS

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Here in Albuquerque, is located at 106.5 W* and 35 N* There is no true south bird however you have 2 birds to choose from one is on AMC-15 105 W* or Anik F1R 107.3W*.

Hope this helps!!:)
 
linuxman

linuxman

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Jul 16, 2006
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Here in Albuquerque, is located at 106.5 W* and 35 N*
That is the point that Al is trying to make.

You should zero your motor and point it south with a compass.

If you are using USALS, enter you latitude and longitude, and then let the motor move the dish to point at 107.3, then you can start adjusting. That will put you close on the arc. You might have to make some slight adjustments of the whole assembly towards east or west, but if you have the motor at 107.3 when it is at zero, that could be the answer.

Fred
 
TRG

TRG

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My opinion is, the motor should be pointed true south, regardless of where the closest satellite to it is at. The settings in the receiver should be set to your location (latitude and longitude) and while the motor is on 0 and pointed to your true south (the south pole). Then using the receiver drive the dish with motor to your true south satellite and adjust as needed.

Yup, that's what I did.
 
iafirebuff

iafirebuff

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Feb 10, 2006
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I have a Primestar dish pointed to G10 since I watch that the most. I am also going to put up a Primestar pointed to 30w in addition to my motorized setup.
 
updatelee

updatelee

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Jul 22, 2006
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My opinion is, the motor should be pointed true south, regardless of where the closest satellite to it is at. The settings in the receiver should be set to your location (latitude and longitude) and while the motor is on 0 and pointed to your true south (the south pole). Then using the receiver drive the dish with motor to your true south satellite and adjust as needed.
Do not adjust as needed on your true south satellite before you drive to it with the receiver. If you are at 107.3, then this is all moot, but if you are somewhere else other than 107.3, then you need to do the above? My thoughts!

Al
yes the motor needs to be pointed at true south, but how you get the motor pointed at true south doesnt matter, its just easier if the dish is aimed at true south.

my true south is 120.3

I tell the motor to goto 121 and aim the setup. because the dish is only 0.7 deg off motor's center. when I adjust dish elevation I can be assured that I am accually moving the dish veritcally.

if I chose a satellite like 61.5 its ALOT harder, I tell the motor to goto 61.5 and the dish is now skewed almost 90deg. the motor is still pointing at true south, but now when I adjust the dish elevation its accually moving the dish east/west and not vertically at all.

so if you pic a satellite a few deg off center its not really a big deal, but the farther you go down the arc (true south is allways the top of the arc) the harder it will be to adjust the setup.

no matter what satellite you choose, even if its 0.7deg off center, you still need to tell the motor to goto that satellite first, else your arc will be off by 0.7deg.
 
digiblur

digiblur

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My opinion is, the motor should be pointed true south, regardless of where the closest satellite to it is at.

Not an opinion, that is a fact. It will be a long night and flat forehead later and you still won't have the dish tracking the arc.
 
updatelee

updatelee

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the motor needs to point south yet, but the dish doesnt.

pick any sat close to your true south and you wont have a problem.
 
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