Whats the diff between lnb&lnbf (1 Viewer)

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bumbumkoala

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Nov 28, 2005
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Well, I'm new here and belive me, i'll probably be comming alot to this site!

So heres the deal, my parents want to have the free satellite, but my dad doesnt want to get ripped off by a guy installing the satellite himself. We talked to one of our friends and he said we need two things, the box (the one we're getting is the SatCruiser 101 Plus+) and a dish (we were told to get the 33").

Now, I've never had satellite tv and don't understand any of it. One problem I have is that i dont get the difference between a LNB and a LNBF! The satellite that we're going to connect to is Intelsat 5.

So, whats the difference?
 
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bumbumkoala

Thread Starter
Member
Nov 28, 2005
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Iceberg said:
LNBF is what you will get...most of us say LNB though :)
(they are different but alot of us think of one in the same)

Oh ok! that makes sense, just kinda freak me out for a long while
 

SimpleSimon

SatelliteGuys Master
Supporting Founder
Feb 29, 2004
5,692
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Florissant, CO
theratpatrol said:
Isn't there also something called an LNA? Low Noise Amplifier?
That's old, old technology.

In the beginning, ... the LNA and the BDC (Block Down Converter) were separate units. Then, VLSI circuits were invented, and the LNA married the BDC. ;)

Your next question is probably: "What is the BDC for?"

Answer: To convert the incoming signal down to frequencies that can be easily carried over coax cable. :)
 

k2ue

SatelliteGuys Family
Feb 4, 2004
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Victor, NY
SimpleSimon said:
That's old, old technology.

In the beginning, ... the LNA and the BDC (Block Down Converter) were separate units. Then, VLSI circuits were invented, and the LNA married the BDC. ;)

Your next question is probably: "What is the BDC for?"

Answer: To convert the incoming signal down to frequencies that can be easily carried over coax cable. :)

Yes, early C-band setups (circa 1979) actually brought the 4GHz signal amplified by the LNA indoors, originally through copper hardline pressurized with dry nitrogen, then through foam-filled aluminum hardline. Early Downconverters (often single channel, not Block) weren't weatherproof, so it wasn't until they were both Block-converting and weatherproof that the stage was set fore the LNB as we know it now. My recollection is my first 150K LNA cost me $550 in 1979, down from $1K the year before, due to huge volume (hundreds. . .) from cable going TVRO.
 
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