A bunch of questions from a newbie! (1 Viewer)

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Please reply by conversation.

Test12345

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Pro
Mar 11, 2007
155
3
Hello all, I want to thank you for all of your help over the past week! I have a bunch of questions for you guys since you've motivated me to do some satellite maintenance (and since I want to do this the right way :)).

1)I want to purchase some new RG6 wire, is there anything specific I should look for, or will any RG6 wire work? Any recommended places to order it from (I was thinking monoprice)?

2)What kind of coaxial cable ends should I get, from where, and is there a specific way I should install them (to weatherproof them or whatever)?

3)Does the actual type of dish have any effect on my signal (i.e., should I get a bigger one)?

4)If I want a new LNBF, what should I look for? Any specific ones recommended? Where should I get one? Are they just "plug and play" (for lack of better terminology lol)?

5)How can I split the signal so that we can have one receiver downstairs and another upstairs? Just use a basic splitter in the wall?

6)Is there anything I can do to make absolutely sure that the dish won't move if there's a lot of wind? Every once in a while, we'll lose some channels if the wind gets too extreme (but gain other ones).

I know these questions seem really, really basic and I sound stupid, but I'm a HUGE newbie. Thanks a lot! :eek:
 
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Mr Tony

SatelliteGuys Pro
Supporting Founder
Nov 17, 2003
287
35
Mankato, MN
1. RG6 is fine. I buy it on a 500 foot spool at Lowes
2. you mean ends? I use PPC EX6XL ends....they're pretty cheap on EBay and are compression ends. The tool you can get at Lowes too
3. The bigger the better.....
4. Most LNB's work the same. There are 2 types. Universal and Standard. UNiversal LNB's are more designed for Europe (where they have a low and high band)...Most North American sats are high band only so a standard is fine
5. get a dual output LNB. You can't "split" the signal per se unless the LNB is bandstacked. You can get a simple 2 output LNB for 2 or more receivers
6. mount as low to the ground as you can. But I've had my motorized KU dish up for 8 years on the roof with no issues (unless it gets buried in snow) ;)
 

Test12345

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Pro
Mar 11, 2007
155
3
Got it, thanks! I'll try to look for some dual output LNBs and report back. They vary wildly in price though...im tempted to just get the cheapest one i see from amazon.
 

SatelliteAV

SatelliteGuys Master
Lifetime Supporter
Sep 3, 2004
6,486
183
Roseville, CA
Check out our GEOSATpro SL2 LNBFs. The SL2s consistently outperform single output models in tests. We put quite a bit of development into this model and use only "A" grade build components. Compare and you will see a difference.

If you are in the market for a 90cm dish, check out the eBay deal in the signature below. Like the LNBFs, GEOSATpro dishes are a great quality product! We would never sell a product that I wouldn't have in my own home......
 
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AcWxRadar

SatelliteGuys Pro
Apr 26, 2006
4,575
4
40 miles NW of Omaha. Omaha?
Hello all, I want to thank you for all of your help over the past week! I have a bunch of questions for you guys since you've motivated me to do some satellite maintenance (and since I want to do this the right way :)).

1)I want to purchase some new RG6 wire, is there anything specific I should look for, or will any RG6 wire work? Any recommended places to order it from (I was thinking monoprice)?

You can get into all sorts of technical specifications regarding the coaxial cable you use. It can get quite in depth. I selected CommScope Brightwire RG-6 and I seek out E-Bay deals of surplus wire on 1000 foot spools. Obviously you won't require that much, but I have been doing FTA installations as well as other applications for friends and relatives and relatives of friends (word gets around) and I have used two + spools in five years.

If you can get solid copper center conductor cable, that is a plus.

I wouldn't opt for quad shield cable unless you are getting a fantastic price deal on it. Quad shield isn't necessary and you would need to buy compression connectors to fit the cable properly. This cable would be more for applications in an apartment complex where the cable might be routed nearer to electrical wiring.

2)What kind of coaxial cable ends should I get, from where, and is there a specific way I should install them (to weatherproof them or whatever)?

I buy a lot of little items here: Cable and Satellite Tools - Distributor of Tools for CATV, Satellite, Home Theater, Security, Telecom

50 EX6XL RG6 Compression Connectors

SKY17723 Weather Boot for RG6 & RG59 - Bag of 100.

Ripley CAT-AS-EX RG6/RG59/RG11 Compression Tool

And, from your local auto parts shop: http://www.permatex.com/products/au...e/auto_Permatex_Dielectric_Tune-Up_Grease.htm

3)Does the actual type of dish have any effect on my signal (i.e., should I get a bigger one)?

Although I do not agree that bigger is better in all cases, I do like my two Ku band dishes which are: The Winegard DS-2076 and the GeoSATpro 1.2 M dishes. For C-Band, you would have to go much larger and then, larger IS better.

I bought my GeoSATpro 1.2 M from Brian at SatelliteAV. I have a post here somewhere (maybe in the equipment reviews section) with pictures of my assembly and installation if you get one of these. You could get a LNBF to match that dish from SatelliteAV.

It can often be to your advantage to get an LNBF that is either designed for or tested with a specific dish. The physical geometry and size of the dish and the physical design of the feedhorn of the LNBF can affect performance. The two should be akin to being a matched set. You have a range of adjustment in the LNBF mounting collar to move the LNBF forward and back from the dish to adjust the focal position, but sometimes you might find that you are out of adjustment range before you get to the optimum focal point. If you had just another 1/4 inch or so, it would be better. If you get a matched set, the optimum focal point should be right in the middle of the adjustment range.

4)If I want a new LNBF, what should I look for? Any specific ones recommended? Where should I get one? Are they just "plug and play" (for lack of better terminology lol)?

Make sure you get a STANDARD LINEAR LNBF (L.O. frequency should be 10.750). That will be the most commonly used LNBF type.
A UNIVERSAL LNBF will have two L.O.'s. One with a frequency of 9.750 and one at 10.600 (typically).

Look for a low S/N ratio, high gain and a high stability factor rating if specified or advertised. You want a stable L.O. frequency.

All electronic components generate "noise" in the electrical sense. You want a LNBF that generates the least electrical "noise". All noise is additive and can reduce your signal quality. If you set your dish up at the end of a blacktop parking lot, even the energy from the sun heating the asphalt can generate noise that can be induced into your system. Electrical transformers and high tension power lines add noise. You want to reduce or elliminate all the noise you can. So, the quieter the LNBF itself is, the better.

They are pretty much "plug and play" items, you do have to go into the receiver menus and tell it what the LNBF's L.O. frequency is (or what the frequencies are if it is a Universal LNBF). That's all.

5)How can I split the signal so that we can have one receiver downstairs and another upstairs? Just use a basic splitter in the wall?

http://www.satelliteguys.us/fta-mpeg2-faqs/134124-switch-setups-simplified.html

6)Is there anything I can do to make absolutely sure that the dish won't move if there's a lot of wind? Every once in a while, we'll lose some channels if the wind gets too extreme (but gain other ones).

A solid, rigid mast anchored in concrete on the ground or (if roof or wall mount) firmly anchored to the roof or wall at the base and with solid struts for support (not cables). Beyond this, there isn't much else one can do. It should be good unless it is a major storm and then I don't think you should be watching TV (living in Nebraska, if the wind gets that bad, it means a tornado and we're heading for the basement).

Selecting a sheltered spot to install the dish would also help, but be careful if you get a lot of snow. That sheltered spot may be just where the snow will dump and you'll trade the wind problem for cleaning snow off the dish.

I know these questions seem really, really basic and I sound stupid, but I'm a HUGE newbie. Thanks a lot! :eek:

You definitely do not sound stupid, quite the contrary. These are all very great questions to ask when getting started.

Good luck and have fun!

RADAR
 
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Tron

SatelliteGuys Master
May 6, 2005
6,599
33
Metro New Orleans, LA
To add to the suggestions above, I use RG-6 coax rated at or above 2.2 GHz. For LNBs, I use bandstacked models that deliver both horizontal and vertical transponders down the same wire at the same time. This enables reception of both polarities at the same time without voltage switching, but also requires that each and every component in the signal path is able to pass 2.2 GHz. Using this system, I can split the output from a LNB with a high frequency (again, 2.2 GHz or above) splitter instead of a multiswitch. Bandstacked technology is something you may want to plan for in the future, even if you don't use it now.
 

hwm

SatelliteGuys Pro
Apr 29, 2008
298
0
North Central Idaho
GEOSATpro 90cm dish and SL2 LNBF recommended

Check out our GEOSATpro SL2 LNBFs. The SL2s consistently outperform single output models in tests. We put quite a bit of development into this model and use only "A" grade build components. Compare and you will see a difference.

If you are in the market for a 90cm dish, check out the eBay deal in the signature below. Like the LNBFs, GEOSATpro dishes are a great quality product! We would never sell a product that I wouldn't have in my own home......

I was fortunate enough to win this dish and LNBF in a promotional contest on this website. If I needed another Ku dish, it is the one I would buy. This 90cm dish will get the Ku HD signals that 76cm dishes struggle with.

The dual-output GEOSATpro LNBF is a good one too, and you can mount two of them on the dish in a neat little inexpensive bracket from SatelliteAV that will let you get 101w and 97w (or other Ku sats 4 degrees apart) at the same time.

Please see my review in the review section. I recommend this dish, and so do the other winners. It is high quality, well engineered, and reasonably priced.

One more suggestion: Get solid copper conductor RG-6 coax that is rated for satellite use. Some cheaper coax is copper-plated steel-core.
 

Test12345

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Pro
Mar 11, 2007
155
3
Wow, thanks for all the information! It's amazing to find people who know about all this stuff...up until now I've just had to fiddle around with all this stuff and figure it out myself. So this is REALLY appreciated (especially RADAR, thanks for the writeup)! :) Definitely a lot to think about. Here are some more questions:

1)Do all LNBs fit in all dishes? I really (really) want to replace our small (less than 80cm it seems, according to my rough measurements) with a large GEOSATpro dish, but I dont have the $200+ required at the moment for only the dish (that I wasn't planning on updating anyway lol). Reviews seem great on those dishes.

2)I've noticed that the GEOSATpro SL2 is mentioned as being small so that you can fit a couple side by side...if I do not plan to fit a couple side by side and just use one, would you guys still recommend the SL2 or suggest a different one? I of course would like to spend as little as possible, but if the GEOSAT SL2 is worth it, I will get that one.

3)Lets say I dont want to purchase a cable that requires a compression tool to put the ends on...would that be ok or are the coaxial cables that require the tool to put on really that much better?

As you can tell my main concern is budget. I wish I had more money to spend to put all this stuff together for my parents, but I really don't so I'm trying not to get things that are too expensive. If I had some money to spend I'd get that 1.2m GEOSATpro dish in a heartbeat. :eek: You guys really make me want to spend money. :D
 

AcWxRadar

SatelliteGuys Pro
Apr 26, 2006
4,575
4
40 miles NW of Omaha. Omaha?
You guys really make me want to spend money. :D

Test,

You have nailed it right on the head with your own statement, in your own words. FTA is a HOBBY that is very addictive and you can and probably will "catch" the addiction and desire to spend, spend, spend. Every "toy" that you see, you will be crazy to possess. Once this "bug" has bitten you, there is little chance that you will ever recover. LOL! You are hereby forewarned. :)

That being stated, with a bit of "tongue-in-cheek" humor, let's discuss your questions and queries.

1) Do all LNBs fit in all dishes? I really (really) want to replace our small (less than 80cm it seems, according to my rough measurements) with a large GEOSATpro dish, but I dont have the $200+ required at the moment for only the dish (that I wasn't planning on updating anyway lol). Reviews seem great on those dishes.

The main concern right off is the "neck" diameter of the LNBF. Most FTA LNBF's are manufactured to fit in the clamp of the FTA dish and often you will be provided with (or can order) a clamp to accommodate any LNBF neck diameter. If the neck of the LNBF you have is too small for your clamp, don't worry too much about that. All you need is a roll of electrical tape to wrap around the neck to make it fit. This is a "Red-Green" modification, but it is perfectly acceptable and it works just fine. "Duct Tape"... The Handy Man's special tool! :)

2) I've noticed that the GEOSATpro SL2 is mentioned as being small so that you can fit a couple side by side...if I do not plan to fit a couple side by side and just use one, would you guys still recommend the SL2 or suggest a different one? I of course would like to spend as little as possible, but if the GEOSAT SL2 is worth it, I will get that one.

I wouldn't bother pondering installation of two LNBFs on one dish just right off. That is a possible scheme that works for two satellites which are close together (i.e. 97.0W + 99.0W). However, I would recommend that you opt for a motorized dish and use just ONE single LNBF. If you are interested, you can start a further discussion of motorized dishes in another thread. At this point, I won't go into details, but I will tell you that a motorized H-H dish is nearly a must have. If you are going to get addicted to this hobby of FTA, you MUST have a motorized dish or a HUGE dish farm (lots of fixed point dishes controlled and selected via electronic switches). You will get bored with just one satellite and desire to seek the rest eventually. A motorized system is the most logical method to approach this.

3) Lets say I dont want to purchase a cable that requires a compression tool to put the ends on...would that be ok or are the coaxial cables that require the tool to put on really that much better?

Absolutely do not use crimp-on connectors. Spend the extra money to buy the tool as a one time purchase and do the job right. Compression connectors are by far the best and the only way to go in FTA. There are too many variables that you need to concern yourself with as it is, don't let poor connections and connectors be added to that mix. You will eventually discover that this is a necessity on your own and go this route. Why not save yourself a few bucks and follow this advice from the start? You will just have to trust my judgement on this. I would not steer you in the wrong direction.

Some items may seem to be expensive. Small tools and connectors and what not. However, all of us who have gone down the same road wish that we had known then what we know now. We could have saved lots of money if we had known of and listened to the advice of others.

Please follow our advice. We sincerely want you to have a good experience with your FTA hobby. Many of us went down the road of discovery and spent a lot of money over the years so that we could pass what we learned on to others to make the path easier to follow. Take our advice and wisdom for yourself so that you have more time and information to learn and discover new things and pass that along to the next FTA guy (or gal).

Don't forget to investigate and read the posts in the FAQ area.

RADAR
 

Test12345

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Pro
Mar 11, 2007
155
3
Test,

You have nailed it right on the head with your own statement, in your own words. FTA is a HOBBY that is very addictive and you can and probably will "catch" the addiction and desire to spend, spend, spend. Every "toy" that you see, you will be crazy to possess. Once this "bug" has bitten you, there is little chance that you will ever recover. LOL! You are hereby forewarned. :)

That being stated, with a bit of "tongue-in-cheek" humor, let's discuss your questions and queries.

LOL, my problem is that I get bitten by WAY too many "bugs." High end audio anyone? :(

I've got no idea how to respond to your post nicely with all those separated quotes, so I hope this reply makes sense. I'm actually wanting to only connect to just ONE satellite (G19---97W), but need the dual output LNB so that I can draw a line to a separate room. I was just wondering if the GEOSATpro SL2 is right for me since it seems to be smaller for the specific function of people placing them side by side (which I do NOT want to do). Since I do not want to do that, would a different (larger?) dual output LNB be better?

I'll try and see if I can rent a tool for putting those ends on, I'd really rather not buy an $80-100+ tool to do that...like you said, things are adding up quickly and my original $100 budget I came here with is no longer feasible lol. :D If I could get quad shield cable for a reasonable price, should I go for it?

I think I'm gonna wait on the larger dish since I don't think I want to spend that much more ($200-250+) at this time.

Thanks a TON for your help!
 

AcWxRadar

SatelliteGuys Pro
Apr 26, 2006
4,575
4
40 miles NW of Omaha. Omaha?
LOL, my problem is that I get bitten by WAY too many "bugs." High end audio anyone? :(

I've got no idea how to respond to your post nicely with all those separated quotes, so I hope this reply makes sense. I'm actually wanting to only connect to just ONE satellite (G19---97W), but need the dual output LNB so that I can draw a line to a separate room. I was just wondering if the GEOSATpro SL2 is right for me since it seems to be smaller for the specific function of people placing them side by side (which I do NOT want to do). Since I do not want to do that, would a different (larger?) dual output LNB be better?

I'll try and see if I can rent a tool for putting those ends on, I'd really rather not buy an $80-100+ tool to do that...like you said, things are adding up quickly and my original $100 budget I came here with is no longer feasible lol. :D If I could get quad shield cable for a reasonable price, should I go for it?

I think I'm gonna wait on the larger dish since I don't think I want to spend that much more ($200-250+) at this time.

Thanks a TON for your help!

The SL2 LNBF will be perfect for what you desire to do. Just because it is smaller in physical size has nothing to do with its performance. It is a very good LNBF and the smaller size and weight will be a benefit. I have been using the Invacom QPH-031 LNBFs over the years and they are HEAVY monsters. They weigh like a pound or more. If the LNBF support arm doesn't have additional bracing struts, the weight of this LNBF can cause the arm to sag and even bounce around a bit. This can cause the focal point to move and that can lead to signal quality fluctuations and even drop out if it is bad enough. I would certainly recommend the SL2 LNBF.

If you can get quad shield cable for a steal of a deal, by all means, go for it. Just make sure that you also buy the appropriate connectors to fit.

As for the compression tool, there are lesser priced ones than the one I posted and they are probably just fine. I bought the one I posted because it was able to compress RG11 connectors. After using it for the first time, I was so impressed that I wouldn't have wanted anything else. When I bought mine, it wasn't as expensive as they are now.

A $100 budget is cutting it extremely thin, although not entirely impossible. If you want to keep costs low, become a scrounger like the rest of us. We come up with all sorts of good deals and freebies by just searching around the local areas. Find someone with an old dish and ask them if they are still using it. If not, ask them if they would like to part with it. Or try a satellite installer business shop. Sometimes, and often, they have a pile of older dishes that will work for FTA. Old Primestar and Channel Master dishes etc. I got several very nice ones for $5 each. He was happy to get rid of them and I was happy to take them off his hands. Check sources like Craigslist, too.

RADAR
 

Tron

SatelliteGuys Master
May 6, 2005
6,599
33
Metro New Orleans, LA
I've been using the Zenith ZDS-5061 compression tool since 2005, and it has never failed me. It even got caught in Katrina's flood water and worked fine after being cleaned off. It only works for RG-6 fittings, though, not RG-11, BNC, or RCA. If you need a cheap tool for a standard FTA install, I would recommend it.
 

Test12345

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Pro
Mar 11, 2007
155
3
The SL2 LNBF will be perfect for what you desire to do. Just because it is smaller in physical size has nothing to do with its performance. It is a very good LNBF and the smaller size and weight will be a benefit. I have been using the Invacom QPH-031 LNBFs over the years and they are HEAVY monsters. They weigh like a pound or more. If the LNBF support arm doesn't have additional bracing struts, the weight of this LNBF can cause the arm to sag and even bounce around a bit. This can cause the focal point to move and that can lead to signal quality fluctuations and even drop out if it is bad enough. I would certainly recommend the SL2 LNBF.

If you can get quad shield cable for a steal of a deal, by all means, go for it. Just make sure that you also buy the appropriate connectors to fit.

As for the compression tool, there are lesser priced ones than the one I posted and they are probably just fine. I bought the one I posted because it was able to compress RG11 connectors. After using it for the first time, I was so impressed that I wouldn't have wanted anything else. When I bought mine, it wasn't as expensive as they are now.

A $100 budget is cutting it extremely thin, although not entirely impossible. If you want to keep costs low, become a scrounger like the rest of us. We come up with all sorts of good deals and freebies by just searching around the local areas. Find someone with an old dish and ask them if they are still using it. If not, ask them if they would like to part with it. Or try a satellite installer business shop. Sometimes, and often, they have a pile of older dishes that will work for FTA. Old Primestar and Channel Master dishes etc. I got several very nice ones for $5 each. He was happy to get rid of them and I was happy to take them off his hands. Check sources like Craigslist, too.

RADAR

Got it! I'll look around for some other dual output LNBs but I'm most likely gonna go ahead and get the SL2 since you and others have recommended it!

I guess I will go with the compression tool then! :D

Also, I meant I was just going to come into this forum to ask about buying a new receiver for $100, then you guys talked me into a new LNB, new cables, a new box...and later a new dish!
 

AcWxRadar

SatelliteGuys Pro
Apr 26, 2006
4,575
4
40 miles NW of Omaha. Omaha?
Also, I meant I was just going to come into this forum to ask about buying a new receiver for $100, then you guys talked me into a new LNB, new cables, a new box...and later a new dish!

Test12345,

You will eventually discover that your statement is an accurate description of this hobby in the sense that it is "an addiction" more than it is a hobby. It may sound like a quaint and humorous rib, but it is no joke. You can easily go hog wild with this stuff if the "bug" bites you.

I guess what I recommend is to listen well to the advice of others so that you don't end up buying any "crap" items. Don't spend your money on items that you really don't need or items that you will regret later. Sometimes it can be easy to develop that desire for nearly everything you see, like a kid in a candy store. So, discuss your purchases with us before you jump on them and get several opinions up front and ahead of time. All of us have been a greenhorn newbie ourselves and spent some monies that we didn't need to and regretted it later. Not so much that we ever got taken or conned into buying a lemon or a chunk of junk, but we could have spent the money on something better instead. Allow us to help you so that you have a really good experience with the equipment you do purchase. That's why we are here.

You'll never regret buying a quality product. Just don't buy junk and especially don't buy expensive junk! :)

Have fun and "Keep Looking Up!" :)

RADAR
 

Test12345

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Pro
Mar 11, 2007
155
3
Thanks again for the info! Some other questions:

1)Is it important that I get copper core RG6 instead of copper outside steel core? I dont want to get junk, but I can save a decent amount of money and get more cable if I get the steel cored cable (monoprice).

2)Do you guys think there would be a big difference in signal quality with a 90cm dish vs a 120cm dish? I think my dish right now is 76cm, so im scared a decent quality 90cm dish might not be that much of an upgrade.

3)How likely is it that trees block a satellite signal?

Thanks again all!
 
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FaT Air

HOA Free Zone
Feb 27, 2010
6,668
913
97W 48N
1) if your run isn't too long, and you're not running a motor, should be fine.
RF flows on the outer surface of the center conductor. therefore, the copper clad. Motor and lnbf DC current flow in the center of the center conductor. (RF skin effect) Just make sure the cable you're considering is "sweep tested" to 3Ghz. If only 2Ghz, it's "cutting it too close".
2) Biggest gain will be in rejecting adjacent satellite interference going from a .76 to a .90m dish. Signal levels are sufficient for a 76cm*, but may have some quality issues on some transponders. If it is an issue, a 90cm or 1m should do fine. Don't think one has to jump right to a 1.2, unless you want to. A few instances, S2 and adjacent interference may require a 1.2m dish. Montana PBS on 125W(?), although I get it with a CM 84e dish.
3) If it's in the path, it will. Need a clear path.
* I have a 30 inch commercial (Channel Master) and there's not much I can't get with it.
 

Test12345

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Pro
Mar 11, 2007
155
3
Thanks fat air! I think it said that the wire from monoprice with the steel center is 2.2ghz sweep tested, seems to be cutting it close. Questions:

1)Where do you guys get your wire from? Sometimes people in forums have a generally accepted place to get their wire.

2)Is it ok to use a universal LNBF if all i need is a standard (since I'm in the U.S.)? Someone recommended me an LNBF thats supposedly good, but it's universal.
 

AcWxRadar

SatelliteGuys Pro
Apr 26, 2006
4,575
4
40 miles NW of Omaha. Omaha?
As FaTAir stated,

The solid Cu center conductor is probably not necessary for short cable runs.

I have a very long cable run to a motorized dish, approx 280 feet +. With standard Cu clad center conductor (RG-6 cable), I had trouble driving my motor with about 2/3 shorter cable run. I had a temporary cable run laid out just for testing which was a straight shot from the dish through my open front door and across the living room floor directly to my IRD. Not exactly what I desired for a long term installation! LOL The signal quality was fine, but the motor control was lacking. I also knew that I was going to have to add a lot more cable to lay it out properly. I opted for solid Cu center conductor RG-11 cable for my installation and have never had a motor control problem with that. I bought this as a bulk 1,000 foot roll and saved some $ / foot. Total price was more, obviously, but price per foot was equal to or less than a 50 or 100 foot roll of RG-6 from a hardware store.

Personally, since you already have the 76 cm dish, I wouldn't bother upgrading it right away to 90 cm, 1 M or 1.2 M. You may or may not find it to be necessary. After you have everything installed, do some investigation regarding the reception of the DVB-S2/8PSK signals using the 76 cm dish. If you cannot acquire them, then you will know that you truly need a larger dish and can decide what size to go for then.

I like the GeoSatpro 1.2 M dish because it is really well made and easy to install and align. I tried a 1M Winegard and I was not very pleased with it. It was extremely sensitive to the alignment. This is good for adjacent signal rejection, but it had to be so perfectly aligned that it was not very happy to be on a motor. Any minute slop in the motor backlash would not allow it to position properly.

With my Winegard DS-2076 dish, I was able to get OETA PBS on AMC 14 @ 125°W. This is a DVB-S2/8PSK signal. It may have been a stronger signal than other DVB-S2/8PSK signals on other sats, but I know that at least this channel worked.

Trees will definitely block the signal. Even small branches will. If there are leaves on these branches and especially if they are wet with rain or full of moisture from their roots, that will absorb the signal and prevent it from reaching your dish. However, keep in mind that often the satellites are MUCH higher in the sky than you think. If you are using an offset Ku band dish, the dish will actually be aiming higher than it really looks at first glance.

This is where the solar outage calculator Sun Outage Calculator comes in very handy (one time in the spring and once in the fall). You can stand at the dish installation spot and look at the sun's position in the sky on the proper day and time of the solar alignment and see directly where the satellite is. If the sun is blocked by branches and leaves or a trunk of a tree, the satellite will be blocked, too.

When I was deciding where to locate my dish, I picked out several spots in the yard that made the most sense. i.e. Shortest distance to the house for the shortest cable run, out of the way from most of the lawn mowing and not so detracting from the look of the aesthetics. Also, not where I knew the snow to accumulate too deeply or the wind to blow too much. Then, during the solar outage dates and times, I checked the LOS view at each selected spot for every satellite. Well, I found the best location, but had to sacrifice a bit on the distance away from the house and the shelter from the wind to a certain extent. Never the less, I ended up with a full LOS for every satellite across my horizon. If the satellite is above the horizon limits, I can see it without any obstructions from trees or buildings or what not.

RADAR
 

Test12345

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Pro
Mar 11, 2007
155
3
Thanks again for the information RADAR, I had no idea about that placement stuff...amazing! Pretty clever way of doing things.

Also, thanks for talking me out of a bigger dish! :D I'll get that later if I find I need it. As far as wire length...I'll probably need a 100 foot run, and a 25 foot run. Would it be best to get (since this is what my budget permits):

a)solid copper wire NOT quad-shielded

or

b)copper-clad steel wire quad-shielded

Can't really afford solid copper AND quad-shielded.
 

AcWxRadar

SatelliteGuys Pro
Apr 26, 2006
4,575
4
40 miles NW of Omaha. Omaha?
Test12345,

You should be fine with standard Cu clad RG-6 at 100 feet. I wouldn't concern myself with it unless you reach 160 - 180 feet or more, and with a motor or a current hogging LNBF. FTA LNBFs aren't prone to being current hogs, they demand very little. This would be something for DN or DirecTV installations. They have some LNBFs that demand a great deal of DC power.

RADAR
 
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