Coax Cable as a basic component

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classicsat

SatelliteGuys Pro
Nov 28, 2009
195
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Ontario, Canada
I stand hard. RG58 is the 50 ohm coax used for CB and 2-way radio,as well as 10Base2. I have used it myself for all of them, so know. RG8 is the big version of RG58 (or rather RG58 is the mini version of it, notwithstanding RG-8x). I have used RG213 also, which with N connectors, could do microwave at short lengths, and was used on older C-band systems to connect the LNA to the down converter. RG213 is also 50 ohm.

RG59 is 75 ohm TV coax.
 
B.J.

B.J.

SatelliteGuys Pro
Oct 15, 2008
2,029
1
Western Maine
I stand hard. RG58 is the 50 ohm coax used for CB and 2-way radio,as well as 10Base2. I have used it myself for all of them, so know. RG8 is the big version of RG58 (or rather RG58 is the mini version of it, notwithstanding RG-8x). I have used RG213 also, which with N connectors, could do microwave at short lengths, and was used on older C-band systems to connect the LNA to the down converter. RG213 is also 50 ohm.

RG59 is 75 ohm TV coax.

My memory is a bit foggy on this, but I pretty much agree. I've used RG-214 with N-connectors, not sure how that differs from 213, but I quickly gave up N-connectors because of how hard it was to solder on the connectors, and went back to RG-8. RG-8 and RG58 are both 50 ohm, but it seems like for transmitting at higher power, RG-8 is better, but for low power stuff, and also for connecting instrumentation, RG58 is preferred. But most receivers and tranceivers and instrumentation are matched to 50 ohm cable. I've also seen the RG58 that is used for ethernet, but that stuff is worthless for radio work. I can't beleive they still call that stuff RG58.
But for satellite applications, and for receive only radio work, ie scanners, etc, I've tried RG-8 and RG58 on scanners, and it isn't nearly as good as RG6. If you're going to transmit, then RG6 isn't as good since most transmitters are 50 ohm, but for receive only, RG6 runs rings around RG8 or RG58.

RG 59 is a cheap replacement for RG6, and will work in short runs for satellite work, since this isn't weak signal stuff. I've never tried the RG11, but may eventually give it a try.
 
Tron

Tron

SatelliteGuys Master
May 6, 2005
6,599
33
Metro New Orleans, LA
Will the RG11 tool also do RG6 fittings?

I'm not sure about all of them, but the one I'm using (a Cable Pro clone) will do both RG6 and RG11. I find myself using the smaller, lighter Zenith ZDS-5061 tool from Lowes for my RG-6 F-fittings, though.
 
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Sadoun

Sadoun

SatelliteGuys Pro
Feb 27, 2005
2,320
1
Columbus, OHIO
Will the RG11 tool also do RG6 fittings?

The RG11 Crimper has two crimp slots. One for RG11 (the main one) and another for RG6

PVHEX11.jpg


[FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]RG11 F-Connector Hex Crimp Tool PVHEX11[/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] Crimp tool attaches F fitting to RG-11 coax. Compound hinge makes crimping easy[/FONT].[FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] P[/FONT][/FONT][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]rofessional QUALITY.[/FONT]



There are several RG11 connectors. Some are Compression style and others are Crimp style.


F11-001 PermaSeal-II™ F Series Compression Connectors RG11For RG11 coaxial.50 connectors per bag.
Price / Bag
$95.00



[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Compression RG11 Connectors[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]PPC EX11N716WS [/FONT]
WeatherproofingFor RG11 coaxial.25 connectors per bag.
Sold by piece.
Price / Each Pc $3.50



[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Compression RG11 Connectors[/FONT]

[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]PPC EX11 [/FONT]
For RG11 coaxial.25 connectors per bag.Sold by piece.
Price / Each
$3.15




RG11 "F" CRIMP-ON CONNECTOR (05-F11ALM)
High-quality for professional use. Used for RG11/U Quad-shield cabling for long distribution runs. 10 connectors per bag.
Price / Bag
$5.50
 
Cham

Cham

VE4GLS
Pub Member / Supporter
Dec 19, 2008
2,498
1,045
Boonies
Good to see the RG-11 F connectors are easily available.. One thing I remember from working with the larger cable is that the center conductor is larger than RG-6; possibly 16 or 14 gauge? Will the center conductor fit into the standard F-female receptacle?
-C.
 
M

Mr Tony

SatelliteGuys Pro
Supporting Founder
Nov 17, 2003
557
262
Mankato, MN
Sadoun I only use compression connectors ;)

I think I'll pass on the RG11 right now....got a bunch of good RG6 and dont feel like rerunning all them wires around the house :)
 
N

nydiver

SatelliteGuys Family
Oct 18, 2006
35
0
NY
Good to see the RG-11 F connectors are easily available.. One thing I remember from working with the larger cable is that the center conductor is larger than RG-6; possibly 16 or 14 gauge? Will the center conductor fit into the standard F-female receptacle?
-C.

Sadoun shows an old school 11 that was feed-thru (I shudder, its the top one, the pico-macom) which is what your speaking of, where the CC fed thru the connector body and was inserted into the port. It bent the heck out of the port contacts, sometimes shorting the internal contact to the outer metal port and effectively burning out receivers and LNB's, also after that insertion the port was done as far as going back to a RG6 later. All the other connectors shown are captured pin style, when you put the cable in the connector the CC goes into a step down pin and the CC is now RG6 size.

The PPC comes in several configurations, no ws, ws, (both of those come in original static pin where the pin is in place and never moves, and in movable pin where the pin is hiding and when the cable is inserted it moves forward to show the cable is fully inserted), right angle, right angle ws. There's also plenum 11 connectors. We even have a 2 piece hardline style connector with the KS pin, but that's another story.

PPC's VT tool will do 59,6,7,11,and QR320 with 1 tool. It will NOT do RCA and BNC.
Snap and Seal can do 59,6, RCA, and BNC with 1 tool, but then 7,11 requires a different, larger tool.
Digicon and PCT does 59,6,7,11 not sure if they make an RCA and BNC that fits in that same tool, they might.
Stirling doesn't make an 11 I don't think anymore, but it would require a different tool if they do.
Unsure also about Gilberts tool, but you can use any standard length tool for them like the VT or a Ripley CAT-AS and do 59,6,7,11, and QR320.

If I were to buy a compression tool I'd get a PPC or a CablePrep, both have lifetime warranties, no questions asked, you have a mangled up tool that you used as a wheel chock or hammer that you can send the remains in, and they'll give you a brand new tool gratis. Same goes for the CablePrep prep tool (the blocky yellow tool)
 
Larry1

Larry1

SatelliteGuys Pro
Aug 24, 2005
1,594
138
Port Hope, ON Canada
I have used Digicon connectors for piece of RG-11 I had for my TV antenna. Since I was only going to install two connectors, I just used a vise and a pair of plyers to compress the connectors. The connector comes with a removable centre pin that is placed over the center conductor of the cable, then the cable is pushed into the connecter. Then it is compressed to lock onto the cable. If I could of bought a connector tool for a reasonable price in my area, it would of been the way to go. The only tool I could find in my area was over $100.00 and was just not worth it for only two connectors. The vice and plyers did do a nice job on the compression, just had to take some time in making sure they compressed evenly.
 
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