Computer memory question (1 Viewer)

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harshness

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May 5, 2007
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Here we go.. You were wrong like I told you in the get go... I am certified in 6 platforms going back as far as UNIX, Novell, and up to Citrix virtual server, I have worked as Network Engineer in the Federal Government for over 20 yrs. I am NO HACK
That clearly doesn't make you omniscient in what was available to hobbyists and home users in the 25 years prior to your career.
 
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harshness

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May 5, 2007
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Salem, OR
I found it to have many similarities to RSX-11 and UNIX.
The DOS portion of the Amiga OS was based on TRIPOS (TRIvial Portable Operating System) -- one of the first operating systems written in a high level language (BCPL?).

OOP isn't a good representation of what was going on. The API was based on messaging achieved by passing pointers rather than pushing the parameters on a stack. I remember an IFF picture viewer that was less than 900 bytes in size. You can't do that with OOP.

One of the cooler aspects of the Amiga operating system was the IFF identification system that allowed the system to look at a file header and determine how to deal with the file (i.e. show picture, play sound, etc.) rather than the Mac's file mangling "resource fork" or the the incredibly primitive system of using filename extensions that Windows remains dependent on today (who hasn't been rewarded with some manner of "this program requires Windows" abend?).
 
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Need2learn

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Aug 13, 2018
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That clearly doesn't make you omniscient in what was available to hobbyists and home users in the 25 years prior to your career.
Yawn comparing my skill level to your is like taking your car to someone that fixes cars, vs taking your car to a certified mechanic. Oh the boot leg mechanics can fix most thing to a certain point after that you have to take to the professional.

Two things it was a very interesting debate. As one person said I was digging myself in a deeper hole, I don’t think so.
I remember doing computers back in the 80’s very well. Every 286’s we had were all XT models we only had less than 10 of them. If memory serves me well the 286’s that had the 10 meg hard drives(mfm) in them they were the AT models but since we didn’t have any not positive on that.
 

harshness

SatelliteGuys Master
May 5, 2007
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Salem, OR
Yawn comparing my skill level to your is like taking your car to someone that fixes cars, vs taking your car to a certified mechanic.
I'm not comparing your skills to anyone else's. I'm contrasting your statements with something much closer to reality.
As one person said I was digging myself in a deeper hole, I don’t think so.
Since I'm the one that mentioned it, I disagree. It isn't intended as an insult -- it is an observation that you continued to make false statements.
I remember doing computers back in the 80’s very well. Every 286’s we had were all XT models we only had less than 10 of them. If memory serves me well the 286’s that had the 10 meg hard drives(mfm) in them they were the AT models but since we didn’t have any not positive on that.
As I hope that I've made clear, pre-assembled personal computers have been around since well before you were introduced (the Radio Shack TRS-80 debuted in 1977) and kits have been around much longer than that.

For some perspective on how far I go back, I used dBASE, Multiplan and Wordstar productively in 1977.
 

Need2learn

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Aug 13, 2018
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I'm not comparing your skills to anyone else's. I'm contrasting your statements with something much closer to reality.

Since I'm the one that mentioned it, I disagree. It isn't intended as an insult -- it is an observation that you continued to make false statements.

As I hope that I've made clear, pre-assembled personal computers have been around since well before you were introduced (the Radio Shack TRS-80 debuted in 1977) and kits have been around much longer than that.

For some perspective on how far I go back, I used dBASE, Multiplan and Wordstar productively in 1977.
Well that was before my time, I was in School at that time. Now one part of computing I would never say I have any type of skills in, that would be Software programming, I have put my toe in the water on that side and found out I need a LOT MORE SCHOOLING..
 
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