Installing a 10 foot cband dish into side of a building

Sammughal

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Feb 7, 2020
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Toronto Ontario Canada
Hello all, I would like to install a 10 foot c band mesh satellite. I would like to use a pole and use two clamps and use 3/4 screws, I would like it to be as secure as possible, this will be done on a commercial plaza building, I would just like some advice on installing the pole, the diameter of the pole would be 4 1/2 but i would like to know if the two clamps of the tall pole bolted in with those clamps with 3/4 screws would be enough or not as i would like the dish to stand the strong winds etc. The pole will start from the middle of the building going past the roof 5 feet or so. Would this be suitable for install ? I would like the dish to be secure and to be able to stand strong wind. I would rather not have to pole from ground to roof but rather begin in the middle as it may obstruct, however if it is necessary i can put the pole in from ground to roof past 5 feet. Also is 5 feet past roof length enough to move a 10 foot dish comfortably? Please let me know your ideas and suggestions.
 

Brct203

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Dec 24, 2016
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Connecticut
Hello all, I would like to install a 10 foot c band mesh satellite. I would like to use a pole and use two clamps and use 3/4 screws, I would like it to be as secure as possible, this will be done on a commercial plaza building, I would just like some advice on installing the pole, the diameter of the pole would be 4 1/2 but i would like to know if the two clamps of the tall pole bolted in with those clamps with 3/4 screws would be enough or not as i would like the dish to stand the strong winds etc. The pole will start from the middle of the building going past the roof 5 feet or so. Would this be suitable for install ? I would like the dish to be secure and to be able to stand strong wind. I would rather not have to pole from ground to roof but rather begin in the middle as it may obstruct, however if it is necessary i can put the pole in from ground to roof past 5 feet. Also is 5 feet past roof length enough to move a 10 foot dish comfortably? Please let me know your ideas and suggestions.
my initial reactions are:
- Is the building structure suitable for this? Or will a strong storm damage that wall from the pressure on the dish?
- What happens if the structure fails and the dish falls? Any risk of people getting hurt?

Other than that, it's really hard to answer without knowing the details of the building structure...
 

Sammughal

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Family
Feb 7, 2020
35
6
Toronto Ontario Canada
my initial reactions are:
- Is the building structure suitable for this? Or will a strong storm damage that wall from the pressure on the dish?
- What happens if the structure fails and the dish falls? Any risk of people getting hurt?

Other than that, it's really hard to answer without knowing the details of the building structure...
Here’s pictures below of the structure.
 

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primestar31

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The weight of the dish itself isn't that much of a deal. The WIND LOAD however, IS. A 10ft C-band dish can have 500 or more pounds of wind load in a 50MPH wind. Nothing like watching your dish snap loose, and fly away, only to be smashed into something and ruined.
 

primestar31

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If it's a mesh dish than wouldn't it be porous ? Because it's not solid? Wind would go through it so wouldn't the wind effect would less ? Just asking.
Nope, mesh dish acts as solid in high winds.

By the way, no answers here at Satelliteguys are likely going to be any much different in answer, compared to your 9 page thread over at Rick's.
 
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Sammughal

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Toronto Ontario Canada
Ok guys thanks for your inputs. There’s a install done in a similar way in a city down from where I am. Will see how they bolted it in. It’s been there since the 80s and it’s still there. Will see what they used to keep it there for so long.
 

primestar31

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when I google windload 10ft mesh i get this
Wind force on the antennas (worst case wind normal to face)2547 lbs.
Yeah, in a hurricane, at about 150mph. It's not ever likely to be that high in regular winds. BUT that said, I would prepare for at least 500 - 700lbs, IF the OP's area is windy. Especially if it's mounted up as high or higher than the roof of a building.
 

Sammughal

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Family
Feb 7, 2020
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Toronto Ontario Canada
Yeah, in a hurricane, at about 150mph. It's not ever likely to be that high in regular winds. BUT that said, I would prepare for at least 500 - 700lbs, IF the OP's area is windy. Especially if it's mounted up as high or higher than the roof of a building.
I will get a structural engineer tomorrow to come inspect and give me his input. He’s only a block down from the unit and he is a certified structural engineer. Will ask if the pole installed in a specific method would support the winds with a 10 foot dish installed. Let’s see what he says. Thanks.
 
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primestar31

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You can also get a Schedule 80 pole installed, as opposed to a standard Schedule 40. 80's are twice as thick, and much more resistant to high wind load. Personally, if the dish pole will be taller than the roof, I'd for sure do a Schedule 80 pole. Unless it's really well supported by the building supports itself, for most of its length.
 

Magic Static

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There is a couple 10' dishes bolted to the brick wall of my old high school sticking over the third floor. Looks like two 6 foot 3" iron straps welded to the pole and bolted to the brick wall. Both those dishes haven't been aligned due south for 10 years or more ;) They spun on the poles.
 

cyberham

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Jun 16, 2010
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I've always wondered how a dish installed like that is actually tuned. How do you access? It's one thing for a commercial installer to perhaps use a bucket truck at original installation. But for the dozens of tweaks required later which is a large part of the hobby, it seems it would be difficult.

Sent from my SM-G950W using the SatelliteGuys app!
 

harshness

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If that construction material is anything like cinder block, it will likely tear it apart unless you bolt it all the way through the wall with heavy straps inside and out.

A non-penetrating roof mount may be a better approach and has that added benefit of not requiring repairs when it is carefully removed.

Either way, there should be a qualified engineer involved.
 

Comptech

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Jun 26, 2006
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Nope, mesh dish acts as solid in high winds.

By the way, no answers here at Satelliteguys are likely going to be any much different in answer, compared to your 9 page thread over at Rick's.
Agreed, feel like their is some trolling going on here. Also want's it for analog C-Band as the main reason to put it up.
 

(((Garyd)))

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I did it, I should do a google earth search it might still be up, that doctor I did it for, ended up doing 18 months, so who knows it was a 10 foot Wingard a brick house
 

Comptech

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I will get a structural engineer tomorrow to come inspect and give me his input. He’s only a block down from the unit and he is a certified structural engineer. Will ask if the pole installed in a specific method would support the winds with a 10 foot dish installed. Let’s see what he says. Thanks.
I think your best bet would be to look up Glentech on google, he will have the answers you want.:)
 

Sammughal

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Family
Feb 7, 2020
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6
Toronto Ontario Canada
If that construction material is anything like cinder block, it will likely tear it apart unless you bolt it all the way through the wall with heavy straps inside and out.

A non-penetrating roof mount may be a better approach and has that added benefit of not requiring repairs when it is carefully removed.

Either way, there should be a qualified engineer involved.
Thanks for telling me about the type of brick. I will check and see what kind it is.
 

(((Garyd)))

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I had my C-band 12-foot dish up at my roofline from 1984 to April 2018 May 2018 a tornado hit goes right over my house, I doubt it would have made it through that sucker, but it did make it through a lot of bad storms ice storms heavy winds up to 60 MPH
 
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