Poll: Do you prefer OAR content or modified to fit 16x9 screen?

madpoet

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We're trying to see what people prefer for veiwing. The results will hopefully go to Voom :). For definition, OAR is original aspect ratio. This is the original ratio (4:3, 2.35:1, 16x9) that the film was shot in. Many times, Voom is taking the OAR and changing it. This often means ditortion of the picture and cropping of the viewable area. Please note, this only applies to the channels Voom has direct control over. They can't help it if Starz decides to stretch and crop.
 

rudolpht

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Sep 12, 2003
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Poet,

I have never seen Voom stretch anything (like ESPN does, we'll see that soon I hope, I guess). It may crop, spindle, or mutilate HD but never stretch, i.e., the aspect ratio is maintained (horizontal:vetical), but the framing is messed up & content is lost.

The only stretching is SD material at user option (which I leave "pillar boxed").

The poll should be:
Do you prefer 4:3 content stretched horizontally to fit a 16:9 screen
Do you prefer 4:3 content be zoomed/cropped to fit a 16:9 screen
Do you prefer aspect ratios greater than 1.78 to have sides cropped to fit a 16:9 screen

OR

Do you prefer OAR
Do you prefer content to modified to fit a 16:9 screen
 

madpoet

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Eh, I probably shouldn't have said stretched. Can't edit a poll though (I don't believe).
 

Sean Mota

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Sep 8, 2003
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madpoet said:
Eh, I probably shouldn't have said stretched. Can't edit a poll though (I don't believe).

I believe you can edit the poll. go to edit and see what options are available.
 

aarton

Active SatelliteGuys Member
Mar 29, 2004
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you know what I don't understand, why wouldn't they just broadcast everything OAR and let people adjust it as they wish with their TV's?
 

madpoet

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Many TVs can't/won't alter a 720 or 1080 signal. I know mine will only let me effect a 480 signal.
 

Ilya

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Feb 16, 2004
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madpoet said:
For definition, OAR is original aspect ratio. This is the original ratio (4:3, 2.35:1, 16x9) that the film was shot in.
Just a small correction. OAR is not necessarily the aspect ratio the film was shot in, but rather what it was intended for. For example, the movie could be shot in 16x9 - the normal resolution of a 35-mm film, but later cropped for a wider aspect ratio. The director's initial intent - is what is important when we are talking about OAR. Which of course brings a twist in the OAR debate: Do we always know the director's intent? Do all directors intend their movies for theaters and not for TVs? Etc., etc. In most cases, however, there is no argument: 16:9 cropping goes against the director's initial intent.
 

truqui

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Mar 4, 2004
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Are you guys specifically talking about films? If this is the case I'd prefer OAR becuase as mentioned this would be closer to what to director intended which is a movie screen format like 16:9
If it's ALL content, mainly programs which were originally intended for TV (4:3) then I would rather have it modified, not necesarily stretched. My TV can only do "expand" when in 1080i which is not good PQ.
 

dledeaux

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Mar 13, 2004
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Longview, TX
Ilya said:
Just a small correction. OAR is not necessarily the aspect ratio the film was shot in, but rather what it was intended for. For example, the movie could be shot in 16x9 - the normal resolution of a 35-mm film, but later cropped for a wider aspect ratio. The director's initial intent - is what is important when we are talking about OAR. Which of course brings a twist in the OAR debate: Do we always know the director's intent? Do all directors intend their movies for theaters and not for TVs? Etc., etc. In most cases, however, there is no argument: 16:9 cropping goes against the director's initial intent.

That's a good point. I suppose when I watch a movie I want to watch it as closely as possible to how the director intended for me to watch it. Typically they have a very good idea of exacly how they want everything to look. Watch the director's commentary on Seabiscuit for an example of this.

The other twist however are Disney movies for example. With Disney movies being designed on computer, they simply render multiple versions of the movie. They may actually render three different versions. One for 2.35:1, one for 1.77:1 and one for 1.33:1. Which one is more "accurate"? The theater version or the 16:9 version? They aren't really panning and scanning, but more removing information from the middle of the scene and pushing the main focus together. You might lose some of the original artistic intent but the fact that it's accounted for makes it a little better.
 

obba

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Mar 3, 2004
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i have a 16:9 display.

4:3 i prefer stretched (pref. more streched on the sides and less stretch in the middle)
the rest i prefer oar.
 

rudolpht

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Sep 12, 2003
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I would imagine the premium content crowd which would be a target audience for Voom would go this way. I'm actually surprised the modified crowd is so large.
 

Gr8Reb8

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Mar 8, 2004
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The problem is that it is easy to spot black bars (sides or top/bottom), so it is easy to complain when you see them. If a movie was chopped/cropped, fewer will notice and bother to call to complain.
 

trugel

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Mar 25, 2004
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Streched Image

I'm new to this so I'm not sure if this is the right place to post my question.

I have noticed that the image is being cut off at the top of the screen. I have a Mitsubishi widescreen TV, model #: WS55613 and the latest software on the Voom set-top box. As a matter of fact the set-top box was replaced and I still have this problem. I have also had my TV serviced to ensure that this is not caused by the TV. I have the TV connected via DVI cables and see verify that my TV is getting 1080i input. My tv has the ability to zoom but I do not have this mode turned on.

I notice this on the VOOM news channel, Rave, Sportsworld and others.

Has anyone else experienced this and are there any setting in the set-top box that I can change?

Thanks,
 
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