Commodore 64 changed into music instruments!

harshness

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My neighbor had this and the Atari 2000 or something like that.
In 1979, Atari offered the 400 (membrane keyboard) and the 800 (full-travel keyboard). There were many follow-ons including the 5200 gaming console.

In 1985, the 68000 powered ST family (520ST, 1040ST) began. There were a few follow-ons there as well but they are pretty rare to find.
 

rvvaquero

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I've got a barely used Asus eee PC and a like new Acer Aspire One which I'd be willing to furnish if someone would like to build an Alto Saxophone or something similar.
 
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harshness

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Netbooks aren't particularly suitable as they are a clamshell design where the keyboard is covered by the display. Then there's the nightmare of choosing the operating system and writing the software. On the C64, you can talk directly to the hardware.

I can't imagine how one might introduce a reed or other mouthpiece into the setup.

Have you seen the Yamaha YDS-150?

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TheKrell

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I'd imagine the creator of the Commodordion was being facetious at some point too.
Not only that, but just about every instrument has been turned into an electronic one with MIDI out. An example is the digital Sax in harshness's post above. It doesn't matter what you play, you can turn your skill into some other instrument through electronic MIDI magic. In the early days of MIDI isntruments, I once went to a Chip Davis (Mannheim Steamroller) concert at Wolf Trap, and he spent considerable time explaining how he made his music. At one point he asked his violinist to play a "drum set"! That just about brought down the house.
 
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