New Apple M1 CPU

Until they move this processor into the MacPro, most of us will not know the capabilities. The 16GB RAM limitations of the current generation M chip seems to be a game changer for the dedicated video pros that rely on the MacPro. Once they move an M series processor to this line, the real truth will be exposed.

I have no doubts that Apple can create a game changer on the MacPro platform, but who would be able to afford the hardware? The most recent iteration is truly out of the reach of the users.

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I certainly think Apple can beat the performance of the current Xeon-based Mac Pro, and they don't necessarily need to match the core count to do it. The 16-core Threadripper Pro workstations we just got where I work run circles around the 2-socket, 40-core, Cascade Lake R CPUs in the previous batch at a considerable discount. Xeon parts have a ridiculous markup compared to what they should cost.
 
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I certainly think Apple can beat the performance of the current Xeon-based Mac Pro, and they don't necessarily need to match the core count to do it. The 16-core Threadripper Pro workstations we just got where I work run circles around the 2-socket, 40-core, Cascade Lake R CPUs in the previous batch at a considerable discount. Xeon parts have a ridiculous markup compared to what they should cost.
I didn't consider that the in house chipped Mac Pro would be much cheaper than the Intel chipped ones. Great point. Hope it comes to fruition.

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I didn't consider that the in house chipped Mac Pro would be much cheaper than the Intel chipped ones.
I'm not convinced that is a rational expectation given that Mac Pro CPUs will likely have almost no economies of scale (assuming Apple follows the current SoC model).
 
I'm not convinced that is a rational expectation given that Mac Pro CPUs will likely have almost no economies of scale (assuming Apple follows the current SoC model).
Economies of scale doesn't mean what it used to with semiconductor manufacturing. Binning allows a line that makes 32-core chips to also make 24, 16, 12, etc. at various clock speeds. Needless to say TSMC has got this process down to a science.
 
Seems like they wouldn't be starting out at the very bottom if that were the case.
IDK. Starting with the high-volume sellers seems like a pretty bold move to me. Hopefully no serious issues like the Pentium's math bug in this first generation of CPUs. The bigger chips will go into lower-volume, higher margin products, but those are the products which will benefit most from any performance increases, so they had better get it right. Also, it gives ISVs time to port their software to the new architecture, so you get less complaints from power users. I don't know those are the reasons. Just speculating.
 
And it’s not like Apple hasn’t been making A-series CPUs or S-series SOCs for several years. The M1 is bigger, but well-known to the Apple Silicon engineering team.
 
I didn’t get a chance to play around with the one at our local Apple store the other day, but I did take this picture to get a sense of the size difference between it and its older sibling:
1652749540132.jpeg
 

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