Windows 11 (2 Viewers)

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arlo

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Dec 4, 2016
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Passwordless accounts these days are obsolete. On computers. TCP/IP printers or USB printers attached to routers that will accept them (Asus) are the way to go.
You could certainly create an account on the other machines with your credentials and leave it stagnant.
That's what I do. Networking is a bit easier then.
The latest updates have borked some of the features that MS deemed insecure.
I don't have 100's of 10 installs. God, I hope I never do. But I do ok.
Function Discovery services get shut off in Services. Registry keys either have to be edited or added to ease networking.
There are too many things that I tweak after setup to address each one. Kind of like riding a bike. I zip through them w/o thinking.
What worked 6 months ago dies after an update. Registry gurus fascinate me. I zip through Google faster than...you know...through a goose to find fixes. I have a dedicated bookmarks folder in my browser for reference.
Although we are veering from the original Windows 11 subject, these situations will probably migrate to "it" if and when it comes.
Or as Microsoft tech sites and Dell asks..."We're sorry you're having these issues. We haven't exerienced them as of yet. Are you sure your PC is plugged in the correct receptacle?"
 
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Foxbat

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Regarding the issue of installation, I heard that Windows 11 Home Edition won’t install without an Internet connection and a Microsoft account. Has anyone else seen this mentioned?
 

EarDemon

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Dec 5, 2014
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Regarding the issue of installation, I heard that Windows 11 Home Edition won’t install without an Internet connection and a Microsoft account. Has anyone else seen this mentioned?
No, but then again I have not read anything about it.

This is exactly what is wrong with the internet, speculation and baseless rumors. I refuse to read anything by these wanna be tech journalists that are attempting to scoop each other. Reading these articles results in clicks and views which is just more encouragement to keep posting speculation and baseless rumors. There's really no point in reading these rumors or thinking about them as all will be unveiled in a week from now.
 
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TheKrell

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Jan 4, 2007
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If it's a USB printer what happens when you type in \\printserver\printersharename in a Run window?
I'm trying to print using this USB printer from my W7 computer in the same room. When I type the above, I get a popup window asking me for a username/password on my daughter's domain! I think that has to do with her computer coming up first. No, that makes no sense. My wife and daughter both have a W10 computer upstairs, and my wife's computer is always on and booted first. But her W10 computer downstairs is the one where we have a USB printer attached. Why is this so difficult? This was a snap on W95.
 

EarDemon

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Dec 5, 2014
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When you get that prompt, what happens when you type in machine name\username of the computer that is acting as the printer server in the username field and leave the password field blank if you don't have a pw? Do you get the error in my screenshot?
 

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EarDemon

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Dec 5, 2014
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Passwordless accounts these days are obsolete. On computers. TCP/IP printers or USB printers attached to routers that will accept them (Asus) are the way to go.
You could certainly create an account on the other machines with your credentials and leave it stagnant.
That's what I do. Networking is a bit easier then.
The latest updates have borked some of the features that MS deemed insecure.
I don't have 100's of 10 installs. God, I hope I never do. But I do ok.
Function Discovery services get shut off in Services. Registry keys either have to be edited or added to ease networking.
There are too many things that I tweak after setup to address each one. Kind of like riding a bike. I zip through them w/o thinking.
What worked 6 months ago dies after an update. Registry gurus fascinate me. I zip through Google faster than...you know...through a goose to find fixes. I have a dedicated bookmarks folder in my browser for reference.
Although we are veering from the original Windows 11 subject, these situations will probably migrate to "it" if and when it comes.
Or as Microsoft tech sites and Dell asks..."We're sorry you're having these issues. We haven't exerienced them as of yet. Are you sure your PC is plugged in the correct receptacle?"

I have three computers at home, two computers at work. From the original retroactively named 1507 to the one month old 21H1 there have been 12 versions of Windows 10. I always do clean installs, no exceptions. 5 computers x 12 versions = 60 installations. Add in that I got two new computers in the middle of releases, I've used old computers as test PCs for various things, plus VMs, that's probably 75 installations for myself.

I performed clean installs on 103 Windows 7 computers at work. The first 5 I did on mechanical drives and later replaced them with SSDs. The first 20 or so Windows 10 PCs I ordered had HDDs, I've been slowly doing ripping them out when users go on vacation and replace them with SSDs and do a clean install. I do a clean install of Windows every time a computer gets reissued and we do have a lot of turn over where I work. It's no stretch to say I installed Windows 10 at least 200 times at work alone. Now add in friends, family and co-workers, that has to be at least another 25 - 50 installations.

Using a bootable USB 3 flash drive to install Windows on a SATA SSD with a halfway decent CPU takes less than 10 minutes, 5 minutes or less on NVMe drives. I refuse to troubleshoot most Windows problems these days, my message to my users is let me give you a clean install or learn to live with what ever problem you're having.

I'm the same way with post installation configuration. It's all muscle memory. For my own computers I have .reg files to add or tweak registry keys, so all that gets done in a matter of seconds. Spend 2 minutes in secpol and gpedit to make the changes I desire. Disable everything in Settings -> Privacy, remove pinned to taskbar icons, go into Taskbar settings to turn off most system tray icons, disable the combining of taskbar buttons. Go into Control Panel, add two alternate clocks, disable all power savings settings, disable Fast Startup. Install Open Shell, load my XML file with all my customizations, remove of the metro apps I can. Then its off to the races installing software and configuring it. It's usually takes me an hour to go from a blank drive to almost 100% complete. The almost comes into play because of Adobe CC. Even with NVMe drives and gigabit internet it takes an hour to download and install the whole suite.

I used to bookmark a ton of useful links as well with various instructions for customizations with procedures I can't remember but now I print them to PDF now. There have been times threads have been removed, sites go dark, links go dead.
 
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HipKat

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Yep, when the first beta of Win 10 came out I joined the "Insiders" program and found The Classic Shell desktop, which is still around but now is called The Open Shell Desktop. Went through all the beta testing of 10 and when it went RTM I already had two desktop systems running it and now have 4 desktops and 2 laptops with it and I STILL use that Open Shell Desktop with all of them.

That and I do some computer repair for the local "old people" with Win 10 who all also run The Open Shell desktop!! Most of all those were upgrades from Windows 7.

But personally..........I run Linux Mint Mate and have now for a long time and each one of my desktop systems are MULTIBOOT with various versions of Windowz and Linux Mint Mate, which is now version 20.1.

The only Windows 10 computer here in the house that gets used every day is the Dell laptop that my Daring Wife uses primarily for her website work for the "Fundraiser Alley" online business she runs.

Ennywho, I'll soon be 76 years old and I have some serious reservations as to whether I'll get involved with Win 11?? Just don't know if I'm up to it at my age.

Just saying..................
I'm fine with Win 10 as it is and I'll migrate to 11 just like I have since 3.1` was a shell program for DOS but like you, I dual boot but with Manjaro. I've used so many Distros and Manjaro, for me, is just it.
 

Foxbat

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This is exactly what is wrong with the internet, speculation and baseless rumors. I refuse to read anything by these wanna be tech journalists that are attempting to scoop each other.
I was told this by one of our Desktop Support team who I trust not to talk nonsense, and so I went looking for an example. I wouldn't call Paul Thurrott a hack, and his Fresh Install of Windows 11 Professional is documented here:

This is what I saw and am sharing from the link:
PaulThurrottWin10.png
 
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EarDemon

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Unless the source is an official Microsoft statement, I'm not believing anything. Remember what Abraham Lincoln once said, not everything you read on the internet is true.
 
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harshness

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Unless the source is an official Microsoft statement, I'm not believing anything.
Of all the official statements, Microsoft's are among the most suspect. They tend to be predicated (and timed) on how close they are to a solution to the problem that they've created.
 
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Ilya

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WINDOWS 11 SUPPORT FOR INTEL​

  • Intel 8th Gen (Coffee Lake)
  • Intel 9th Gen (Coffee Lake Refresh)
  • Intel 10th Gen (Comet Lake)
  • Intel 10th Gen (Ice Lake)
  • Intel 11th Gen (Rocket Lake)
  • Intel 11th Gen (Tiger Lake)
  • Intel Xeon Skylake-SP
  • Intel Xeon Cascade Lake-SP
  • Intel Xeon Cooper Lake-SP
  • Intel Xeon Ice Lake-SP

WINDOWS 11 SUPPORT FOR AMD​

  • AMD Ryzen 2000
  • AMD Ryzen 3000
  • AMD Ryzen 4000
  • AMD Ryzen 5000
  • AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2000
  • AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3000
  • AMD Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3000
  • AMD EPYC 2nd Gen
  • AMD EPYC 3rd Gen
Microsoft notes that CPU generation requirements are a “soft floor” limit for the Windows 11 installer. That should allow some older CPUs to be able to install Windows 11 with a warning, but it’s not clear how these devices will be supported long term.

Here is the full list of supported CPUs:



 

Scott Greczkowski

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As IT director for my company, I can't see us moving to this in a corporate environment, as there appears to be nothing new for the corporate environment. When you are advertising it as being built for gamers and enabling a bunch of things we would not want in a corporate environment it causes concern for me.

While I am excited about being able to run Android apps on my PC, this update appears to be more of lipstick on a pig than a true OS upgrade.
 

harshness

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While I am excited about being able to run Android apps on my PC, this update appears to be more of lipstick on a pig than a true OS upgrade.
To me it qualifies as no more than a point upgrade (i.e. 10.1).

The TPM 2.0 requirement is going to be a stinker for older, non-enterprise machines even if their CPU qualifies.

What's this about a forward facing (towards the user) HD webcam being mandatory on laptops and tablets come New Years Day?

The video output requirement may be problematic on a lot of thinner non-desktop machines. USB C somehow qualifies but they don't appear to require an adapter.

I applaud their movement to kill Internet Exploder but it came waaaay too late.
 
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KE4EST

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What's this about a forward facing (towards the user) HD webcam being mandatory on laptops and tablets come New Years Day?
Make that new years day 2023. So, still time for that to change. I see the TPM 2.0 requirement being the biggest issue for consumers, as you said. So, that is another thing that may get relaxed, if they want their product out to as many as possible.
 

harshness

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Make that new years day 2023. So, still time for that to change.
The requirement for an HD camera (when many already tape over their cameras as a matter of privacy) seems pretty invasive whether six or eighteen months from now. Are they that hard up to generate interest in Teams, do they want to enforce face ID or are they just building a more complete dossier on their user base?
 

HipKat

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To me it qualifies as no more than a point upgrade (i.e. 10.1).

The TPM 2.0 requirement is going to be a stinker for older, non-enterprise machines even if their CPU qualifies.

What's this about a forward facing (towards the user) HD webcam being mandatory on laptops and tablets come New Years Day?

The video output requirement may be problematic on a lot of thinner non-desktop machines. USB C somehow qualifies but they don't appear to require an adapter.

I applaud their movement to kill Internet Exploder but it came waaaay too late.
I had to search to see how to enable TPM on my BIOS and there was a link for a workaround, but it involved mounting the ISO and replacing a specific file with a Win 10 version - which bypasses the TPM 2.0 check. YMMV which is why I'm not posting it

The requirement for an HD camera (when many already tape over their cameras as a matter of privacy) seems pretty invasive whether six or eighteen months from now. Are they that hard up to generate interest in Teams, do they want to enforce face ID or are they just building a more complete dossier on their user base?

All the above?
 
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