To Seal or not to seal? (1 Viewer)

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RT-Cat

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May 30, 2011
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Rain, hail, sleet, snow, it is all moisture. So, do you seal your "f" connectors that are outside or not? If you do, what do you use?
 

turbosat

SatelliteGuys Master
Dec 26, 2006
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Thanks wescopc I haven't seen those before. I usually just gum mine up really good with coax-seal, lol. It seems to work.
 

Lone Gunman

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Mar 19, 2010
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I use Vaseline Petroleum Jelly on all my outdoor connections and it's served me well over the years. It's also cheap too as the Wife usually has some in the medicine cabinet.
 

RT-Cat

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Those rings are interesting.

Thanks wescopc I haven't seen those before. I usually just gum mine up really good with coax-seal, lol. It seems to work.

That is what I have used in the past.

There is a self amalgamating tape that you can buy that seals out the weather.

I have seen tape of this type on my friend's Hughsnet connections. Liked the idea it covered both ends of the connector.

I use Vaseline Petroleum Jelly on all my outdoor connections and it's served me well over the years. It's also cheap too as the Wife usually has some in the medicine cabinet.

Hummm, never gave that a thought. Should work OK.

The local Dish Network guy told me he doesn't use anything. For what it's worth...

That is what the Dish installer did here. Wires out of dish to a connector block and then into the house. Grass watering gets it all wet along with the rain.

Thanks guys for the interesting ideas.
 

Mikey11

SatelliteGuys Pro
Nov 9, 2009
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canada
i have never used anything and never had a problem....i dont like protection (haha, okay bad joke) we get basically every weather condition possible here....heavy rains, hail, and heavy snow etc etc....as long as you use good quality cable and connectors i dont think its nessessary....
 

hwm

SatelliteGuys Pro
Apr 29, 2008
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North Central Idaho
I use silicone grease inside all outdoor antenna coax connections. Have never had a moisture or corrosion related problem. It's also good stuff to use inside automotive plug-in wiring connectors. You can buy it at auto parts stores.
 

Iceberg

The No Pain Train
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Nov 17, 2003
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I use to use silicone grease but then if I try and take that stuff off it looks like someone blew their nose on it

I use those rings in post #2...the installer who installed my Directv dish gave me a bag of them (and as bag of PPC 6XL connectors since I used those on my setups)
 

coinmaster32

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Sep 25, 2010
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Like the rest of you I thought those rubber seals on the ground blocks dish and DIRECTV use would keep the water out.

When new coax was installed a few days ago. I took the ends off the old ground block that had rubber seals on it and one of the connections had gotten water in it and had corroded. The connections were on a pole, so it was never in an area that had moisture on it a lot .

I have used that "tar tape" that they used to include with your old c-band lnb's but it would just adsorb water and defeat it's purpose.

I use GE Premium Silicone. It is supposed to last 35 years, and it sun and freeze proof. I put it on where the coax goes into the back of the compression fittings,and where the fittings meet the male connection. That stuff will do a good job.
 

Wescopc

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Sep 11, 2005
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Canby, Oregon
Lately, I've been using PPC-EX6XLWS fittings, which have an integrated sealing ring, on my outdoor cabling.
I use and like those a lot! It is best to use a torque wrench with the WS fittings - they can feel tight when they are not tight enough, because they need to have good a metal to metal connection for reliability. I have had to return for a trouble call (No signal) because they weren't tight enough in the first place!
Bob
 

TRG

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A torque wrench? How do you get a socket on a fitting?
202730.jpg or stahlwille-crow-foot-spanner-tp_1642511084156491924b.jpg
 

TRG

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I never use any sealers on my coax connectors. Then again we only get around 9" of rain annually in these here parts.;)
 

Pixl

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Feb 27, 2010
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Traverse City, Michigan
Like the rest of you I thought those rubber seals on the ground blocks dish and DIRECTV use would keep the water out.

When new coax was installed a few days ago. I took the ends off the old ground block that had rubber seals on it and one of the connections had gotten water in it and had corroded. The connections were on a pole, so it was never in an area that had moisture on it a lot .

I have used that "tar tape" that they used to include with your old c-band lnb's but it would just adsorb water and defeat it's purpose.

I use GE Premium Silicone. It is supposed to last 35 years, and it sun and freeze proof. I put it on where the coax goes into the back of the compression fittings,and where the fittings meet the male connection. That stuff will do a good job.

Is this a silicone grease, or a glue type product?
Can you post some details on the stuff?

I use a product bought from the place where I get my coax connectors called dielectric grease. Seems to work ok.
 

coinmaster32

SatelliteGuys Pro
Sep 25, 2010
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USA
It's just premium silicone, the kind they use for windows. Keeps water out.

Make sure you get the freeze/sun proof, the other stuff is made for kitchen and bath, not made for outdoor use, the stuff I use is for windows.
 
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